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DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 
DURHAM, N. C. 







Form 934— 20M— 7-35 



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From d Photograph by Baydrd Woollen 



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Published annually by the Student Body 

• Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 

Volume number twenty-three... Spring 1936 

■«^ Ernest Cruikshank and WUliam E. Woodruff. Editors • E. Hyatt MosBburg. Business Manager 




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From a Photograph by Bayard Wootten 







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From a Photograph by Bayard Wootten 



CONTENTS 

Book One 

UNIVERSITY 

Book Two 

ACAD EMIC 

Book Three 

FEATURES 

Book Four 

ACTIVITIES 

Book Five 

ORGANIZATIONS 



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Book One 



UNIVERSITY 



290904 







-HE great Atlantic sea- 
board of eastern North Carolina 
affords a beauty that is varied 
and exotic. Deep, crystal lakes 
. . . treacherous sounds and 
inlets . . . expansive beaches, 
silvery and iridescent . . . 
isolated islands, rich in the lore 
and tradition of an early 
American Colony . . . silent sand 
dunes, dazzling in the whiteness 
of a noon-day sun . . . 





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From a Photograph by Bayard Wootten 




"HE main gate- 
way . . . entrance to the 
West Campus . . . Duke 







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(^HAPEL, Student 
Union and Administrative 
offices. 



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CLOSE-UP of 
the Union . . . center of 
activity when there are no 
classes to attend. 





.ROWELL Tower 
at the west end of the 
quadrangle rising above 
and adjacent to dormitory 
houses on all sides. 





"HE Law School 
and Library viewed from 
the terrace of the Medical 
School. 




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VIEW of the 
north side of the West 
Campus quadrangle look- 
ing toward the Medical 
School. 




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CLOSE-UP of 
Kilgo and Crowell, two of 
the dormitory houses. 




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CLOSE-UP of 



the Medical School, sit- 
uated at the east end ol 
the Quadrangle. 





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-HE Duke 
Bowl, with the Gym- 
nasium and Field House 
in the background. 







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-H E Union o n 
the Women's College 
campus, a mile and a half 
east of the Duke Univer- 
sity West Campus. 




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.AST DUKE . . . 
the Administration build- 
ing on the campus of the 
Woman's College. 




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Dr. William Preston Few has served as President of Trinity College and Duke 
University since 1910; last December Dr. Few celebrated his twenty-fifth anni- 
versary as head of the institution. He received his A.B. Degree from Wofford 
College in 1889, A.M. from Harvard in 1893, and Ph.D. in 1896, his LL.D. from 
Wofford College in 1911, Southwestern University, 1912, Allegheny College, 
1915, Syracuse University, 1928, Ohio Wesleyan, 1928, and University of North 
Carolina, 1932, his Litt.D. from Birmingham Southern College in 1930. In 
1933, he was President of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, and for 1935-36 he was named President of the Southern University 
Conference. 



WILLIAM PRESTON FEW 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Litt.D., LL.D. 

President of Duke University 



37 



ADMINIS- 





|;-fTt^> 




Robert Lee Flowers 



THE BUSINESS DIVISION 

Much of the untiring effort which has made 
possible the transition from Trinity College to Duke 
University has been expended by the Business 
Division. The offices of this division are responsible 
for the supervision of loan and scholarship funds, the 
collection of accounts, the provision for classrooms, 
rooming and boarding accommodations, the purchase 
of supplies, and the care and maintenance of the 
East and West Campus buildings and grounds. 

Robert Lee Flowers, Vice President in the Business 
Division, was graduated from the United States Naval 
Academy in 1891. He resigned from the Navy to 
accept an instructorship in mathematics at Trinity. 
He is also Secretary and Treasurer of the University, 
Secretary of the Executive Committee of the Board 
of Trustees, a Trustee of the Duke Endowment, and 
of several other institutions. 

Henry R. Dwire, Director of the Department of 
Public Relations and Alumni Affairs, graduated from 
Trinity College in 1902, and received his M. A. degree 
the following year. One of the outstanding figures 
in Southern journalism, he is Managing Editor of 
the South Atlantic Quarterly, and 
Editor of the Duke University 
Alumni Register. Charles E. Jor- 
dan, Assistant Secretary, has direct 
supervision of the correspondence 
with prospective students. C. B. 
Markham, Assistant Treasurer, has 
been greatly instrumental in organ- 
izing and directing the Treasurer's 
Office, and in conducting the 
business of the University. Frank 
C. Brown came to Trinity College 
in 1909 as Professor of English, 
but for many years has tseen 
Comptroller of the University. 




Henry R. Dwire 



THE EDUCATION DIVISION 

The history of Duke University is marked by several 
distinct stages. After its beginning in 1835 as 
Union Institute, it became Normal College in 1851, 
and Trinity College in 1859. During this period the 
college was located in Randolph County, N. C; but 
in 1892 it was transferred to Durham. Duke Uni- 
versity was founded in 1924 as a result of the Duke 
Endowment provided for in the will of the late 
James B. Duke. Trinity College is the name still 
retained to designate the division of undergraduate 
instruction. 

William H. Wannamaker, Vice President of the 
University in the Education Division and Dean of 
the University, has been a part of Duke University for 
thirty-seven years, first as Professor of German, and 
later as Dean and Vice President. He received his 
A.B. degree from Wofford College in 1895, and his 
M.A. degree from Trinity College in 1901 and from 







Jorde 



Bro\vn 



Markham 



38 



TRATION 







Alice M. Baldwin 



Harvard in 1902, and his Litt.D. degree from Wofford 
in 1917. Alice M. Baldwin, Dean of the Woman's 
College of Duke University, received her A.B. and 
M.A. degrees from Cornell University, and her 
Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago. Dean 
Baldwin came to Trinity College in 1924 as Dean 
of Women. She became the first Dean of the 
Woman's College of Duke University in 1930. 

Herbert J. Herring, Dean of Men, is a graduate of 
Trinity College. After receiving his A.B. degree 
in 1922, he went to Columbia University, where, in 
1929, he was awarded his M.A. in College Adminis- 
tration. He assumed the office of assistant dean in 
1931 and in 1935 became Dean of Men. 

Walter K. Greene, Dean of Curricula, was grad- 
uated from Wofford College in 1903. He received 
his M.A. degree from Vanderbilt University in 1905, 
and his M.A. and|Ph.D. degrees from Harvard in 








William H. Wannamaker 



1921 and 1923. For eight years he was Dean at 
Wesleyan College, and in 1928 he came to Duke 
University as Professor of English. In 1930, Dr. 
Greene became Dean of Undergraduate Instruction. 

Alan K. Manchester, Dean of Freshmen, first entered 
college at Southwestern University and received his 
A.B. degree from Vanderbilt in 1920. At Columbia 
University he received his Master's degree and later 
he earned his Ph.D. degree from Duke University. 
Dean Manchester first came to Duke in 1929 as 
instructor in History. In 1934 he became Dean of 
Freshmen. 

Mrs. Ruth S. Smith, Assistant Dean of Women, 
received her A.B. degree from Agnes Scott College 
in 1912. Then going to Columbia University, she 
received her A.M. degree in 1927, and soon after 
became a member of the Duke University faculty. 

Miss Mary G. Wilson graduated from Winthrop 
College, receiving her A.B. degree in 1921. She 
came to Duke as Acting Dean of Women in 1929, 
and in 1930 she became the Social Director of the 
new Woman's College. 



Herring 




Greene 



Smith 



Wilson 



39 




DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 
Dr. Blomquist, B.S., Ph.D., head of the Botany Department, studied at the Pasteur 
Institute, in Paris, held a fellowship and became an instructor at the University 
of Chicago before he was elected to the Duke faculty in 1920. As an author, 
he contributes to the "Botanical Gazette," "Elisha Mitchel Journal," and 
"Botanical Abstracts," in addition to writing "The Liverworts of North Carolina" 
and "Grasses of North Carolina and Their Distribution," read before a meeting 
of the Botanical Society of America in 1932. Dr. Blomquist is a member of the 
following organizations: A.A.A.S., Botanical Society of America, American 
Association of Geneticists, Sullivati Moss Society, and is a Fellow in the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Dr. Paul M. Gross, head of the Department 
of Chemistry, came to Duke from Columbia 
University in 1919. He holds a B.S. from the 
Blomquist College of the City of New York, and the A.M. 

and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. 

He is prominent in the field of chemistry, being 

a member of the American Chemical Society and the American Association for 



the Advancement of Science. 




He is also a member of the American Association 
of University Professors and Phi Lambda Up- 
silon. He has served as Director of Research 
for Liggett & Myers Research Foundation. 



Dr. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

W. H. Glasson, Dean of the Graduate 



School and head of the Department of Econom- 
ics, first came to Duke University in 1902. 
Before his connection with this University, he 
had earned his Ph.B. at Cornell University and 
his Ph.D. at Columbia University. Dr. Glasson 
is the author of numerous books, among which 
is the "Pension System of the United States." 
He is widely known for his frequent magazine 
articles and addresses on economics. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Glc 



Dr. Holland Helton, head of the Department of 

Education and Dean of Summer Schools, is a 

graduate of Trinity College. A faculty member 

since 1912, he has written many articles for "North Carolina Education" and is 

a popular speaker at educational gatherings. Under the capable directorship 

of Dr. Holton, the Duke University Summer 

_ School has expanded enormously during the 

past few seasons. Editor of the Trinity "Alumni 
Register" for a number of years. Dr. Holton is 
a member of the following honorary organiza- 
|L~ ^ -' "^ *.^-^^^^ *'°"s- Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Kappa Alpha, 

Wti "^ B»r" " Kappa Delta Phi, Phi Delta Kappa, and the 

North Carolina Education Association. 



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Gross 




Holton 



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DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Dr. Laprade has been a professor of European and English history at Duke since 
1909. Many historical and educational societies, including Phi Beta Kappa and 
the Royal Historical Society of England claim Dr. Laprade as a member. Author 
of "the best English history by an American," "British History for American 
Students," he is a frequent contributor to historical and political science 
reviews. He is a favorite of all audiences, and his nimble wit adds an informa- 
tive interest to his courses. 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Dr. William McDougal, head of the Department of Psychology, attended 
Cambridge University, England, from 1890-94, and there received the degrees 
of M.A. and Ph.B. He received the degree of M.B. from St. Thomas Piospital in 
1898. His wide teaching experience, previous to his work at Duke University, 
includes four years at the University of London, twelve years at Oxford, and six 
years at Harvard. During the World War he held the commission of Major in 
the Royal Army Medical Corps. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of London. 
His many works on physiological, social, and abnormal psychology have 
caused him to be considered one of the outstanding psychologists in the world 
today. 

DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION 

Professor H. E. Myers joined the faculty of Duke 
University in 1926 after a most successful series 
of pastorates. He is now Professor of Biblical 
Literature in the School of Religion. A grad- 
uate of Duke, class of 1915, Professor Myers 
received the degrees of S.T.B. and S.T.M. from 
the Boston University School of Theology, in 
Episcopal Church. He has served a number 
being the Duke Memorial Church of Durham. 



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MacDougal 



the pastorate of the Methodist 
of important charges, the last 



Myers 




Ellwood 



DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE 
LANGUAGES 

Professor Albert M. Webb, head of the Romance 
Languages Department, has been a member of 
the Duke faculty since 1903. He holds the A.B. 
and A.M. degrees from Yale. Through the 
efforts of Professor Webb the department has 
risen to a position of prominence on the Duke 
Campus. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

Dr. Charles A. Ellwood, head of the Sociology 

Department, has gained international fame in 

his field. After graduating from Cornell, Dr. 

Ellwood studied at the University of Chicago, 

University of Berlin, and the University of 

London. He holds degrees of Ph.B. and LL.D., 

and before coming to Duke, he held faculty 

positions at the University of Nebraska, Columbia, Chicago, University of 

Missouri, Colorado, Utah, and the University of Wisconsin. Since 1931, Dr. 

Ellwood has presided over Pi Gamma Mu. A 

prolific author, he has written many articles for 

"Encyclopedia Americana" in addition to his 

numerous texts. Dr. Ellwood was elected 

president of the International Association of 

Sociologists in 1934. 




Webb 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Dr. George Thomas Hargitt, head of the Zoology Department, came to Duke in 
1930 from Syracuse, where he was a professor of Zoology. He was, previous 
to that time, an instructor in the Zoology Department at Harvard. His degrees 
include an A.B. from Syracuse, an A.M. from the University of Nebraska, and a 
Ph.D. from Harvard. Dr. Hargitt is the co-author of the widely used text, 
"Outline of General Biology." 




Hargitt 



41 



f^\m 




Seeley 




Brown 




DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Walter James Seeley, E.E., M.S., head of the Department of Electrical Engineer- 
ing, has long been an outstanding figure in his field. During the World War, 
he gave his services to the United States in the capacity of electrical engineer 
in the submarine division. Since he has been connected with Duke, his untiring 
efforts have brought about numerous advances in the Department of Electrical 
Engineering, rapidly bringing it into widespread recognition. 



DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY 

Clarence Ferdinand Korstian, head of the Department of Forestry, received his 
B.S.F. degree from the University of Nebraska in 1911, and his M.F. in 1913. 
In 1924 he obtained his M.A. from Southeastern Christian College. He was 
Research Fellow at Yale University, receiving his Ph.D. in 1936. He came to 
Duke in 1930 as Director of Duke Forest and Professor of Silviculture. He is a 
member of the executive council of the Society of American Foresters, was 
Chairman of the Appalachian Section of the Society in 1928, and has held 
several other positions of importance in the organization. Among the organiza- 
tions of which he is a member are: the American Forestry Association, the 
North Carolina Academy of Science, the Ecological Society of America, the 
North Carolina Forestry Association, the Botanical Society of America, and the 
the American Society of Plant Physiologists. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Dr. Frank C. Brown, head of the English Department and Comptroller of Duke 
University, came to Trinity College in 1909. He holds the A.B. degree from 
the University of Chicago. Dr. Brown is a former president of Omicron Delta 
Kappa, national honorary fraternity, and is also a charter member of the chapter 
established at Duke University several years ago. As Comptroller of the 
University, he has been actively identified with the life of the institution and the 
community in various ways. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Dr. Charles W. Peppier, head of the Greek Department in Duke University, 
received his A.B. and Ph.D. degrees at Johns Hopkins. He has studied at the 
University of Berlin and traveled extensively in Europe. Dr. Peppier came to 
Duke from Emory University in 1912. As well as being a contributor to such 
periodicals as "The American Journal of Philology," "Classical Philology," 
"Classical Weekly," and the "South Atlantic Quarterly," he is a member of the 
following organizations: American Philology Association, American Classical 
League, American Association of University Professors, and Phi Beta Kappa. 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Dr. Clement Vollmer, head of the German Department of Duke University and 
one of the most popular speakers in the faculty, is widely known in academic 
circles. At Heidelberg College, in 1909, he received his Bachelor of Arts 
degree, and at the University of Pennsylvania, in 1914 and 1915, earned both 
the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. Prior to his connection with Duke University, 
Dr. Vollmer taught at Cornell University and at the University of Pennsylvania. 
H'^ is author of "The American Novel in Germany," and is widely recognized 
an authority on German literature. 



VoUr 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

William Whitfield Elliott, acting head of the Mathematics Department, received 
his A.B. degree from Hampden-Sidney College in 1918, his M.A. from the 
University of Kentucky the following year, and his Ph.D. from Cornell University 
in 1924. His teaching career began in 1919. He came to Duke from Yale, 
where he taught during the year 1924-25. Member of the American Mathe- 
matical Society, the Mathematical Association of America, the North Carolina 
Academy of Science, and Sigma Chi. He has been a constant contributor to 
many important mathematical journals. 



DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Harold C. Bird, head of the Department of Civil and Mechanical Enqiiieering, 
received his Ph.B. degree from Yale in 1908, and his C.E. degree two yt-ai s later 
from the same university. Before he came to Duke he had held an Assistantship 
in Sheffield Scientific School. Later, at Pennsylvania Military College, he held 
the successive positions of Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Pro- 
fessor of Civil Engineering. That he is an outstanding figure in the world of 
engineering is evidenced by the fact that his name appears in "American Men 
of Science," "Who's Who in Engineering," and "Who's Who in Education." 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Alban Gregory Widgery, head of the Department of Philosophy, received his 
M.A. from Cambridge University. He was Burney Student and Burney Prize- 
man at Cambridge, and has also studied at the Universities of Jena and Paris. 
During the year 1914-15, he was Instructor in Moral Philosophy at the University 
of St. Andrews. From 1915-22 he was head of the Department of Philosophy in 
Baroda College of the University of Bombay, and, from 1922-28, Stanton Lecturer 
in Philosophy in Cambridge. In the year 1929-30 he was Professor of Philos- 
ophy at Cornell, and came to Duke in 1930. He was President of the Baroda 
University Commission from 1926-28, and is, at present. Vice President of the 
American Theological Society. 



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Dr. Raymond R. Rosborough, head of the Latin Department, received his A.B. 
degree from John B. Stetson University in 1915, and his M.A. and his Ph.D. from 
the University of Pennsylvania. He was C.R.B. Fellow at the University of 
Louvain in the year 1921-22, and Docteur en Philologie Classique. From 1922- 
24 he was a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome. After holding the 
position of Professor of Latin in the University of North Carolina in the year 
1924-25 he came to Duke, where he has remained since, with the exception of 
a year spent as Visiting Professor at Cornell University. 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Dr. Robert R. Wilson, departmental head in Political Science and graduate of 
Austin College, received his M.A. degree from Princeton and his Ph.D. from 
Harvard. He was registrar of Austin College until 1925, when he came to Duke. 
Extremely successful as a teacher. Dr. Wilson has carried on extensive research 
into various subjects in his field. He follows closely the state of world affairs 
and centers his interests on international law. 




Elliott 




Widgery 




Wilson 



43 




Zack Thomas 
President 



Experience has shown that the best method 
in which to handle student problems and to 
gain harmony throughout the student body 
is through the students themselves. This 
was the fundamental purpose for the organ- 
ization of a system of Student Government 
at Duke University in 1922. 



MEN'S STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 

Over the span of fourteen years, this 
organization has grown and prospered until 
today we feel proud to say that we have a 
form of government in which student partic- 
ipation has been a great benefit. 

But the supervision of various problems 
among the student body is not the sole 
function of the Student Council. The pur- 
pose and aim of the Student Government 
Association as stated in our constitution is 
"to create an effective organization for ad- 
ministrating student self-government, to sup- 
port athletics, to foster literary endeavor, to 
encourage all other worthy student activities, 
and to promote the best interests of the 
University and the student body." Yearly, 
the Student Council takes part in the orienta- 
tion of freshmen. Enthusiastic work has been 
done to create a series of lectures and other 
literary entertainment. 

In the fall of the year the freshmen were 
feted at a Student Government Freshman 
Dance, made possible through the coopera- 
tion of the Men's and Women's Student 
Councils. Later in the fall semester the 
annual Victory Ball was enjoyed by the 
entire undergraduate membership. In the 
line of social activities for the members of 




Council in Session 



44 



MEN'S STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



the Student Government, this year's Student Council has 
initiated a new idea and one which has proven to be very- 
satisfactory; namely, that of presenting a series of dances, the 
music being furnished by a nationally known orchestra. 

The Student Government Association of Duke University has 
not confined its workings to matters of local interest. Since 
1930 it has been a member of the National Student Federation 
of America. From time to time our representatives have held 
offices in this national organization. Duke University was 
one of the first to help establish the North Carolina Federation 
of Students, which has been declared the most powerful body 
of its kind. 

The Student Council of 1935-36 has found it necessary to 
make several inevitable changes in the rules and by-laws of 
this organization. The former system of a House of Repre- 
sentatives has been disbanded and replaced by a more strict 
system which has shown itself to be more efficient. The En- 
gineers' Council has been given a non-voting representative 
at the weekly trials. Minor rules of the constitution have been 
changed at various times when the need for more proper 
legislation has arisen. 

As Duke University has grown in size and position, so has 
the organization of the Men's Student Government Association 
grown in importance. Splendid cooperation between this 
body and the administrative officials has gained for this group 
a just solution for any problems that have arisen before it. 

Thus the purposes of this department are many in number, 
serving a vital need in University life. 




Jack Alexander 
Vice President 

Bob Wood 
Secretary-Treasurer 




Thomas 



Mervine 
Taliaferro 



Perry 
Montgomery 



Wood 
Simmons 



Alexander 



45 




WOMEN'S STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 



Annie Laurie Newsom 
President 



The foremost 
aim of the Wo- 
men's Student 
Counci 1 this 
year has been 
centered 
around the wel- 
fare of three 
varied yet sim- 
ilar groups: the 
University, the 
Woman's Col- 
lege, and the 
Individual, 
working on the principle that our college 
life and its problems are comparable in 
its own setting to the life and problems of 
the citizens of his nation, state, and individ- 
ual affairs. 

No action was taken and no decision was 
reached before reflection was made as to 
the possible good or bad effects on the 
University as a whole, the Woman's College 
as a group, and the student as an individual. 
Although the Student Council was neces- 
sarily concerned with the welfare of the 
group as a whole, it has striven to give the 
highest possible amount of attention to the 
happiness of each individual student. With 



the recognition that every woman student is 
a part of a larger organization, the Council 
endeavored to cooperate with the Men's 
Association and with the staff and administra- 
tive body of the entire University. 

Though revering custom and tradition, the 
Council took nothing for granted and was 
ever conscious of the constant need for 
studying and testing all phases of life with 
which the women were confronted. Where 
change was needed, change was advocated; 
where custom and tradition were the sounder, 
custom and tradition were upheld. Progres- 
siveness with rational progress was the aim. 

The Council tried to focus its attention and 
energy not on one particular phase of life, 
but on the intellectual, social and extra- 
curricula activities. By the use of various 
methods it endeavored to stimulate student 
interest and social responsibility, to solicit 
student opinion on various problems, and 
to keep in touch with the trend of affairs and 
questions with which other college and uni- 
versity students were concerned. In short, 
the policy of this year's council has been 
generally neither radical nor conservative, 
but an attempted policy of identification with 
the highest and best in every situation. 

In connection with the Executive Board, 




Auld 



Whilmyre 



Fa ires 



Culbertson 



46 



WOMEN'S STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 



presided over by the president of the Wo- 
man's College Government, is a Judicial 
Board, presided over by the vice president. 
This body deals with major offenses and 
matters referred to it by the Executive Body, 
and is composed of the president, the record- 
ing secretary, the house presidents, and a 
member-at-large. 

While there are a few automatic penalties 
for various offenses, and while the board 
endeavors to hand down judgments as uni- 
form as possible, each offense is carefully 
studied and considered from all angles with 
the aim of arriving at a penalty which will 
prove of the most benefit and aid to the 
individual. 

In 1934-1935, the first Student Forum Com- 
mittee was organized and has been continued 
with the following purposes: to lead group 
discussions among the students, to gauge 
student opinion, and to act as an inter- 
mediary group between the Student Council, 
the administration, and the student body at 
large. One of its most beneficial and pri- 
mary functions is to plan a series of lectures 
for the women students, financed by the 
women students. 

OFFICERS 
Annie Laurie Newsom, President; Eleanor 




Eleanor Barrett 
Vice President 



Barrett, Vi ce 
President; Mary 
Au Id, Treas- 
urer; Martha 
Jane Culbert- 
son. Assistant 
Treasurer; 
Betty Fa ires. 
Recording 
Secretary; 
K a t h e r i n e 
Whitmyre, Cor- 
responding 
Secretary; 

Mary Frances Ivey, Chairman of Social stand- 
ards; Inez Abernethy, President of Town 
Girls' Club; Walton Bovi/en, Chairman of 
Point System; Dallas Knight, President of 
Jarvis House; Clary Peoples, President of 
Giles House; Katherine White, President of 
Alspaugh House; Paula Bassett, President of 
Pegram House; Martha Bailey, President 
of Bassett House; Jane Haislip, President of 
Brown House; Louise Warren, President 
of Aycock House; Edith Snook, Junior Class 
Representative; Fan Auld, Sophomore Class 
Representative; Larry Jackson, Freshman 
Class Representative. 




Knight 
Bailey 



Abernethy 
Haislip 



Auld 
Jackson 



Peoples 
Snook 



Bowen 
White 



Ivey 
Bassett 



47 




SOCIAL STANDARDS 
COMMITTEE 



Mary Frances Ivey 
Chairman 



The commit- 
tee on Social 
Standards is 
composed of 
women selected 
from the stud- 
e n t body at 
large on a con- 
sideration of so- 
cial leadership 
by the Chair- 
man and the So- 
cial Director. 
As representa- 
tives of the social sororities, classes and 
various student groups, the members have as 
their objective the guidance and regulation 
of social activities of the Woman's College. 
This goal implies encouragement toward 
the development of a fine social relationship 
among the students of both campuses. 

Because of the varied environments from 
which students come to Duke, an adjustment 
to college life must be accomplished, and 
the Social Standards Committee functions in 
this process. It is this body which first 
introduces freshmen women into the social 
life of the university. During Freshman 
Week at the beginning of the 1935-36 year, 
a series of tea dances in the Ark was spon- 



sored by the committee with the purpose of 
facilitating introduction to the Duke men. 
One of the major accomplishments of the 
group is the sponsoring of the traditional 
Co-ed Balls, which are given in the fall and 
spring of each year. 

Prior to this year, the committee assumed 
part of the responsibility for the Ark with 
Sandals, honorary sophomore organization. 
This year Social Standards has, however, 
initiated a new project in the Woman's Col- 
lege Union. Efforts have been made to 
improve the appearance of the lobby by 
adding and rearranging the furnishings, and 
the building has also been opened for dating. 

The Social Standards Committee was or- 
ganized in 1930, when the Woman's College 
was opened. The Chairman, who is elected 
by the members of the Women's Student 
Government Association and who is a mem- 
ber of the Student Council, is a medium 
between the students and the governing 
body. Since the establishment of the com- 
mittee, the following women have served as 
Chairman: Edith Parker, 1927-28; Courtney 
Sharpe, 1930-31; Leonore Murphy, 1931-32; 
Carlotta Waters, 1932-33; Helen W y a 1 1, 
1933-34; Eleanor Tompkins, 1934-35; and 
Mary Frances Ivey, 1935-36. 




Knight Mewborn Wannamaker Hughes Sills 
Peterson Zecher Farnum Byrn Riley 

Henry Sutton Ramsauer Boyd 



Sasscer Newsom Lewis Love Wagner 
Kleinmans Applewhite Brooks Small Plyler 
Richards Burgess Burger Reist 



48 



^^\-x\on oa 




^■^^[■^^^^. 



Book Two 



ACADEMIC 





I C H , fertile valleys, 
flanked by the low, undulating 
foothills of the beautiful Blue 
Ridge mountains . . . stately, 
white columns of ante-bellum 
Colonial mansions . . . sleek, fat 
livestock . . . golden -yellow 
grain at harvest time . . . these 
are but a few of the beauties of 
the Carolina Coastal plain. 





* 




^«iS!f 



/# 




^^- 






«^ 



'rf^f-^ 



From d Photograph by Bayard Wootten 




SENIORS 



MEN'S SENIOR CLASS 



HISTORY 

We, the Class of 1936, watch the approach 
of June the eighth with a confused feeling 
of anticipation and dread. We are happy 
at the prospect of having completed four 
years cf training, of culture, and of profitable 
experiences which have prepared us, in 
some measure at least, for what lies beyond. 

We rejoice at the thought of graduation into 
that higher university of Life for which we 
have been preparing ourselves, and yet we 
dread the moment that will mean a breaking 
away from the old manner of living, a rupture 
of the friendships and associations that have 
come to mean so much. Surely, no matter 
where we go, no matter what conditions may 
confront us "out there," we shall never 
forget this school, its meaning to us, its 
association into a part cf our very selves. We 
hcpe it will not forget us. 

The Class of 1936, coincident with its own 
mental and cultural growth over a four-year 
period, has witnessed and taken an active 
participation in many of the changes inci- 
dental to the growth of Duke University. 
During the session of 1933-1934 there oc- 
curred drastic changes in freshman rushing 
rules, including a minimum scholastic aver- 
age of "C" as prerequisite to eligibility, 
postponement of rush week until the second 
semester, and housing of the freshman class 
as a unit in a single group of dormitories. 

We have seen Duke rise into national 
prominence in its athletic activities, perhaps 
best exemplified by the immortal eleven of 
1933 which came so near to the attainment of 
a perfect schedule of vistories. Each year of 
our residence has witnessed an increase in 
student enrollment over that of the pre- 
ceding term until further expansion of 
dormitory facilities has become a necessity. 




Frank Sizemore 
President 



Perhaps the greatest single thrill of our four 
years happened one rainy sixteenth of No- 
vember, an event so great that this year 
might well be called "The Year 25-0." 

As a class we have striven to establish a 
closer cooperation between ourselves and 
our classmates of the East. With them we 
have presented to our school a memorial 
gift of a planting of oaks between the cam- 
puses. 

And so it goes, another June approaching 
and another class graduating. Just "another 
class?" We hope not. We cannot fully 
appreciate the untold good our Alma Mater 
has given to us until maturity brings a 
deeper wisdom. 




OFFICERS 

James Henry 
Vice President 

Tom Murray 
Treasurer 

Joseph Hiatt 
Secretary 



Henry 



Hiatt 



Murray 



54 




Ruth Phillips 
President 



HISTORY 



Another Senior Class takes its place in 
the annals of Duke University history as the 
class of 1936 steps over the threshold of 
undergraduate life into the ranks of alumnae. 

The growth and development of the Uni- 
versity has been so rapid that the students 
themselves have felt the tremendous pres- 
sure. It has been a problem to successfully 
deal with this rapid expansion, which is one 
of the challenges the Class of 1936 has 
competently met. Instead of becoming a 
disintegrated group of students within the 



WOMEN'S SENIOR 
CLASS 

complexities of our modern University life, 
the classes of the Woman's College and 
Trinity College have become more closely 
united than ever before. In scholastic en- 
deavor, in organizations, and in social life 
their purposes have been closely related, 
and they have achieved together rather 
than separately. 

The oak trees along the University drive 
between the campuses were planted by the 
Seniors of the Woman's College and Trinity 
College symbolizing a permanent and lasting 
cooperative spirit of the women and men of 
Duke University. 

The painting of the portrait of Dean 
Alice M. Baldwin, a project begun by the 
class of 1935, has been completed by the 
Senior women with the helpful cooperation 
of the underclassmen. 

Under the auspices of this class, the Presi- 
dent's Club has been organized, with the 
President of the Senior Class as permanent 
chairman. 

In the field of athletics this group has 
excelled. The athletic banner has displayed 
the numerals '" '36" for the past two years. 

The oaks planted are still young saplings 
and our only regret is that we cannot remain 
to see them grow into trees. Like them, we 
are still "young twigs," nurtured on the 
Duke Campus. But the achievements of the 
Class of '36 will flourish and grow in a 
larger world. 



OFFICERS 

Dorothy Gray 
Vice President 

Margaret Waldrep 
Treasurer 

Elizabeth Sutton 
Secretary 




Waldrep 



Gray 



Sutton 



55 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Edwin B. Abbott 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Business Adnainistration 

Alpha Tau Omega; Alpha 
Kappa Psi; Class Vice Presi- 
dent, 1; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Student Council, 2; Chronicle, 
], 3; CHANTICLEER, 2, 4; Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 4, Treas- 
urer, 4. 



Charles Wiley Ackley 

Vineland, N. J. 

General 

Delta Sigma Phi; Football, 1; 
Archive, 1, 2, 3; Polity Club, 
3,4. 



Inez Abernethy 

Durham, N. C. 

Teaching 

Delta Delta Delta; Sandals; 
Social Standards, 3; Town Girls' 
Club, Treasurer, 2, Secretary, 
3, President, 4; Women's Stu- 
dent Council, 4; Women's De- 
bate Council, 3, 4, President, 
4; President's Club, 4. 



Jack Alexander 

Asheville, N. C. 

General 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa; Tombs; Foot- 
ball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Govern- 
ment, Vice President, 4. 



Abbott 
Ackley 



Abernethy 
Alexander 



Ellis L. Andrews 

Mobile, Ala. 

Religion 

Huntingdon College, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 4; 
Choir, 4. 



Fredrick H. Andrus 

Akron, Ohio 

Pre-Medical 

Delta Tau Delta; Pegram Chemistry Club, Treas- 
urer, 4. 



Henry M. Andrews, Jr. 

Mobile, Ala. 
Pre-Medical 



Glee Club. 



Ida Shaw Applewhite 

Halifax, N. C. 

General 

Alpha Phi; Delta Phi Alpha; Sorority Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres- 
ident, 4; Music Study Club; Dean's List; Social 
Standards, 4. 



Andrus 



Applewhite 




56 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Will Harman Artley 

Savannah, Ga. 

Civil Engineering 

Delta Sigma Phi; Phi Eta Sig- 
ma; Engineers' Club; American 
Society of Civil Engineers; 
Dean's List. 



Mrs W. M. Baker 

Mebane, N. C. 
General 

Phi Beta Kappa; Dean's List. 



Martha Bailey 

Thomasville, Ga. 

General 

Alpha Delta Pi; Bassett House 
President, 4. 



Charles P. Ballenger, Jr. 

Greenville, S. C. 

Civil Engineering 

Kappa Alpha; Beta Omega 
Sigma; Delta Epsilon Sigma, 
American Society of Civil Engi 
neers. President Duke Chapter, 
Engineers' Student Council 
Secretary; North Carolina Con 
ference of American Society of 
Civil Engineers, President. 




Bailey 
Ballenger 



Ernest D, Barnham, Jr. 

Newark, N. J. 
General 

Tennis, 1; Golf, 2. 



Eleanor A. Barrett 

Stamford, Conn. 

Business Administration 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Women's Student Govern- 
ment, Vice President, 4; Dean's List. 



Artley 
Baker 



Othmar B. Bart 

East Orange, N. J. 
Business Administration 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Boxing, 1, 2. 



Irving W. Bearse 

Hyannis, Mass. 

Civil Engineering 

Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon; American Society 
of Civil Engineers; Delta Epsilon Sigma; Dean's 
List. 



Barnham 



Barrett 



Bart 



Be 




57 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Margaret Anne Becker 

UpF>er Darby, Pa. 

General 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Polity Club; 
CHANTICLEER, 3, 4; Chron- 
icle, 3; Junior Council; Dean's 
List. 



George F. Beneke 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

Pre -Legal 

Lambda C h i Alpha; Pan- 
Hellenic Council; Tennis, 1, 
2, 3. 



Henry S. Bender 

Germantown, Pa. 

General 

Cross-Country, \; Baseball, 1; 
Soccer, 3, 4. 



Ruth Bennett 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Honors 

Alpha Phi; Student Forum; 
League of Women Voters, Pres- 
ident; Dean's List. 



Becker 
Beneke 



Bender 
Bennett 



Elihu Bernstein 

Burlington, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Delta Phi Alpha; Phi Beta Kappa; Band, I, 2, 3, 
4; Archive, 1; Symphony, 1; Musical Clubs, I; 
Sophomore Honors; Junior Honors; Dean's List. 



James C. Black 

Durham, N. C. 
General 



Cyril Edwin Black 

Sofia, Bulgaria 

General 

Columbia Literary Society; International Club; 
French Salon. 



Andrew Lane Blair 

Weston, W. Va. 

Pre -Legal 

Phi Kappa Psi; West Virginia University, 1, 2; 
Dean's List. 



Bernstein 



C. Black 



J. Black 



Blair 




58 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



U. Benton Blalock, Jr. 

Wadesboro, N. C. 
General 

Kappa Sigma. 



James K. Holing 

Siler City, N. C. 

Pre-Legal 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Foot- 
ball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming, 1. 



Williann Fleming Bownnan 

Aberdeen, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Kappa Alpha; Davidson Col- 
lege, 1, 2; Dean's List. 



Fred E. Bratzel 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 
Pre-Medical 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 4. 




Betty Brill 

Manhasset, N. Y. 
General 
Bradford Junior College, 1, 2. 

Joseph Grayson Brothers 

Wilmington, N. C. 

General 

Columbia Literary Society, Secretary, 3; Trident 
Club, 2, 3; Freshman Council; Sophomore "Y" 
Cabinet. 



Blalock 
Bowman 



Dorothy Lillian Brown 

Clarksville, Tenn. 
General 



Delta Delta Delta; Y. W. C. A. Publicity 
man, 4; Duke Players, 4; Glee Club, 4. 



Barbara Marian Browne 

Hickory, N. C. 

Teaching 

Pi Beta Phi; Lenoir Rhyne College, 1, 2 
Club, 4. 



Brill 



Brothers 



Brown 



Browne 





59 



THE 



CHANTICLEER 




William K. Brumbach 

Belleville, N. J. 

Pre-Medical 

Delta Tau Delta; Freshman 
Council, President; Sophomore 
"Y" Council, President; Beta 
Omega Sigma; Pegram Chem- 
istry Club, President, 4. 



Eleanor Wade Bruton 

Biscoe, N. C. 

Teaching 

Kappa Delta; Sophomore 
Honors; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Choir, 1, 2, 3, 4; Music Study 
Club. 



Josie Brunnfield 

Tylertown, Miss. 

Teaching 

Phi Theta Kappa; Alpha Sig- 
ma Delta; Whitworth College, 
1, 2; Delta Phi Rho Alpha; 
CHANTICLEER, 3, 4; Archive, 
3; Chronicle, 3, 4; Publications 
Board, 4; Senior Council; May 
Day Committee, 3; House Com- 
mittee; Dean's List. 



Walter P. Budd, Jr. 

Durham, N. C. 

Pre-Legal 

Kappa Sigma; Golf, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Swimming, 1, 2, 3, 4; Tombs. 



Brumbach 
Bruton 




Brumfield 
Budd 



Kathlyn Buice 

Charlotte, N. C. 
General 



Alpha Delta Pi; Glee Club, 2, 3; Sandals; Polity 
Club; Student Council, 3, 4; Student Forum Com- 
mittee, 4; Student Director of May Day, 3; Sorority 
Pan-Hellenic Council, 4; Giles House President. 



Jean Morton Burd 

Pottsville, Pa. 
General 
Sandals; Class Secretary, 3. 



Robert Burge, Jr. 

Westfield, N. J. 
Business Administration 

Kappa Alpha; Alpha Kappa Psi. 



Lucille Butler 

Shreveport, La. 

General 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Arlington Hall, 
Music Study Club, President, 4. 



El 



Burd 



Burge 



Butlt 




60 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



William D. Byrne 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Business Adnninistration 

Sigma Nu; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Chronicle, 1, 2; Trident Club; 
Columbia Literary Society; Sen- 
ior Council; Dean's List. 



Fred Cady 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Law 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Columbia 
Literary Society, Vice President, 
2, Treasurer, 3; Chronicle, 1, 
2; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 3; De- 
bate Team, 2; Debate Council, 
3; Junior Council; Dean's List. 



Lawrence J. Caruso 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Pre-Medical 

Pegram Chemistry Club. 



Mary Ann Gates 

New York, N. Y. 

General 

Randolph-Macon College, 1; 
Dean's List. 




Ann Chalker 

Durham, N. C. 
Teaching 

Town Girls' Club. 



James Rush Ghandlee 

Gaithersburg, Md. 

Givil Engineering 

Kappa Sigma; Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; 
American Society of Civil Engineers; Wrestling, 
2, 3, 4, Captain, 4. 



Phi Mu. 



Byrne 
Garuso 



Gwendolyn Glark 

Durham, N. C. 
Teaching 



John Totterdale Gole 

Warren, Ohio 
Pre-Medical 



Gady 
Gates 



Lambda Chi Alpha; Duke University Musical 
Club, Secretary-Treasurer, 3, Vice President, 4; 
Choir. 



Ghalker 



Ghandlee 



Glark 



Gole 





61 



THE 



CHANTICLEER 




Richard J. Conradi 

Irvington, N. J. 

General 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Football, 
I; Beta Omega Sigma; Choir, 3; 
Glee Club, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 
3, 4. 



Edward W. Cooey 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

Pre-Legal 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Eta 
Sigma; Phi Beta Kappa; 9019; 
Duke Candidate for Rhodes 
Scholarship, 4; Dean's List. 



Robert W. Cook 

Cooperstown, N. Y. 
General 

Sigma Nu; Duke Players, 1. 



Gerald Cooper 

Durham, N. C. 

Honors 

Iota Gamma Pi, Treasurer, 4; 
Dean's List. 



Cooey 
Cooper 



Irene Cordray 

Point Marion, Pa. 
Teaching 

Glee Club, I, 2; CHANTICLEER, 



William G. Crawford 

Detroit, Mich. 

General 

Sigma Chi; Alpha Kappa Psi; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, 
4, Business Manager, 4; Beta Omega Sigma; Glee 
Club, 1, 2; Choir, I, 2. 



Frank Cottier 

Chelsea, Mass. 
General 



Ernest Cruikshank 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Alpha Tau Omega; Alpha Kappa Psi; Phi Eta 
Sigma, Delta Phi Alpha; Phi Beta Kappa; Omicron 
Delta Kappa; CHANTICLEER, 1, 2, 3, 4, Copy 
Editor, 2, Assistant Editor, 3, Co-Editor, 4; Chron- 
icle, 1, 2; Sophomore Honors; 9019, Treasurer, 4; 
Freshman Council; Sophomore "Y" Council; Pub- 
lications Board, 4; Columbia Literary Society, 1; 
Dean's List. 



Cordray 



Cottier 



Crawford 



Cruikshank 




62 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



John C. Cummings 

Detroit, Mich. 

Business Administration 

Alpha Kappa Psi; University 
of Detroit, 1. 



Margaret Cuninggim 

Nashville, Tenn. 

General 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Sandals; 
Gold "D" Club; Polity Club; 
Delta Phi Rho Alpha; Women's 
Athletic Association Board, 2, 
3, 4, President, 4; Archive, 4; 
President's Club, 4; Dean's List. 



Wm. K. Cunninghann, Jr. 

Appomattox, Va. 
General 

Dean's List. 



C. O. Dailey 

Sussex, N. J. 

Business Administration 

Swimming, 1, 2, 3, 4, Cap- 
tain, 4. 




Barbara Daniel 

Claxton, Ga. 
General 

Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



James M. Daniel 

Henderson, N. C. 



Cummings 
Cunningham 



Lora Frances Davis 

Quincy, Fla. 
Pre-Legal 



Cuninggim. 
Dailey 



Business Administration 

Pi Kappa Phi; Basketball, 1; Baseball, Assistant 
Manager, 1, 2, 3, Manager, 4; Trident Club, 2, 3; 
Junior Council; Commencement Marshal, 3; Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 3, 4; Publications Board, 4; 
Tombs. 



B. Daniel 



J. Daniel 



Distaff, I, 2, Circulation Manager, 2; CHANTL 
CLEER, 3; Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; University Choir, 
1, 2, 3, 4. 



James A. Dearborn 

Brookline, Mass. 

Business Administration 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Trident Club; Football 
1; Track, 1; Wrestling, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List. 



Dearborn 





THE CHANTICLEER 




Irving Owen Dein 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Pre-Medical 

Phi Sigma Delta; Pi Mu Epsi- 
lon; Delta Phi Alpha; Beta 
Omega Sigma; Pan-Hellenic 
Council, Secretary, 4; Swim- 
ming, 1, 2. 



O. Lawrence Dortch, Jr. 

Columbia, Tenn. 
Pre -Legal 

Alpha Tau Omega. 



Robert H. Dick 

Canton, Ga. 

General 

Pi Kappa Phi, Pi Mu Epsilon; 
Phi Beta Kappa; Iota Gamma 
Pi; Pegram Chemistry Club; 
9019; Dean's List. 



Dorothy Dosch 

Somerset, Pa. 

Law 

Glee Club, 1, 2; Choir, 1, 2; 
Bar Association, 4. 



Dein 
Dortch 



Dick 
Dosch 



Augustus John Durner 

Asheville, N. C. 

General 

Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Track, 1; Baseball, 1, 2; Beta 
Omega Sigma; Tombs. 



Charles C. Eberly, Jr. 

Chester, Pa. 

Business Administration 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Pan-Hellenic Council; Cross 
Country, 1, 2; Track, 1, 2. 



Josephine Eaby 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Social Service 

Sigma Kappa; Delta Phi Rho Alpha, 2, 3, 4; 
Eko-L; CHANTICLEER, 2, 3; Women's Athletic 
Association Board, 3, 4, Vice President, 3; White 
Duchy; Dean's List. 



J. Arnold Edmunds 

Youngstown, Ohio 
Electrical Engineering 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers. 



Durner 



Eaby 



Eberly 



Edmunds 



1 




64 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Dorothy Louise Edwards 

Durham, N. C. 
General 

Dean's List. 



George Bain Everitt 

Winnetka, 111. 

Honors 

Delta Tau Delta; House of 
Representatives, 3; Publications 
Board, 4; Chronicle, 1, 2, Soci- 
ety Editor, 3; CHANTICLEER, 
4; Beta Omega Sigma, Secre- 
tary, 2; Freshman Council; 
Sophomore "Y" Council; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet, 3; Junior Coun- 
cil, 3; Junior Pan-Hellenic 
Council; Pegram Chemistry 
Club. 



Nan Evans 

Riverton, N. J. 

Social Service 

Glee Club, 3, 4; Choir, 3, 4; 
Music Study Club. 



George Reed Failing 

Luke, Md. 
Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma; Soccer, 3, 4. 




Albert Royal Fairchild, Jr. 

Glenside, Pa. 
Business Administration 

Beta Omega Sigma; Football, 1, 2, 3. 



Sara Louise Falls 

Shelby, N. C. 

General 

Kappa Delta; Polity Club, Secretary, 4; Debating 
Club; President's Club. 



Lenora Fanning 

Asheville, N. C. 
General 

Kappa Alpha Theta. 



Fairchild 



Falls 



Fanning 







Ellen Farnum 

Asheville, N. C. 



Phi Mu; Phi Beta Kappa; Social Standards, 3, 4; 
Eko-L; Freshman Adviser, 3, 4; Polity Club, 3, 4; 
Pan-Hellenic Council, 3; Dean's List. 



65 



THE 



CHANTICLEER 




Robert E. Farrell 

Boston, Mass. 

General 

Beta Omega Sigma; Chron- 
icle, 1, 2, 4. 



Newton E. Faulkner 

Elmhurst, N. Y. 

General 

Delta Tau Delta; Delta Phi 
Alpha; New York University, 1, 
2; Baseball, 3; Dean's List. 



Farrell 

Faulkner 




Farthing 
Fogel 

Norma Forbes 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
General 


Zeta 
1, 2. 


Tau 


Alpha; Packer Collegiate Insti 

J. B. Ford 

Savannah, Ga. 
Pre-Medical 



Frances Farthing 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Teaching 

Choir; Glee Club; Freshman 
Adviser. 



Rubye Fogel 

Georgetown, S. C. 

General 

Alpha Epsilon Phi; Chi Delta 
Phi; Women's Student Council, 
3; Publications Board, Secre- 
tary, 4; Sorority Pan-Hellenic 
Council, 3, 4; Junior Big Sisters, 
Treasurer, 3; Music Study Club; 
Chronicle, 2; Archive, 1, 2, 3; 
Distaff, 1, 2; May Day, 3; Fresh- 
man Honors; Gold "D"; Dean's 
List. 



Russell Forrest 

Bloomfield, N. J. 
Pre-Medical 



Pi Kappa Phi; Track, 1, 2, 3; Cross Country, 1, 
2, 3; Tombs. 



Phi Kappa Psi. 



Margaret Franck 

Durham, N. C. 

General 

Kappa Delta; Theta Alpha Phi; Duke Players, 
2, 3, 4; Town Girls' Club; Dean's List. 



Forbes 



Ford 



Forrest 



Franck 



!k 




66 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Lewis O. Funkhouser 

Hagerstown, Md. 
Business Administration 

Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Darwin C. Gallup 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

Business Adnninistration 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Dean's 
List. 



Lawrence L. Gent 

Cold Spring, N. Y. 

General 

Phi Kappa Psi; Kappa Kappa 
Psi; Band, 1, 2; Symphony Or- 
chestra, 1, 2; CHANTICLEER, 
2; Beta Omega Sigma. 



Howard Robert Getz 

Nazareth, Pa. 
Business Administration 

Phi Kappa Psi; Dean's List. 




Funkhouser 
Gent 



Gallup 
Getz 



J. A. Gibbons 

Durham, N. C. 
General 



Wrestling, L 



H. Clark Gillies, Jr. 

Melrose, Mass. 
Business Administration 

2, 3, 4, Adver- 



Edwina Gidney 

Shelby, N. C. 
Teaching 



Delta Sigma Phi; Chronicle, 1 
tising Manager, 4; Baseball, 1. 



Stephen Arnold Ginn 

Royston, Ga. 

Pre-Medical 

Columbia Literary Society; Pegram Chemistry 
Club; Duke Players; Archive, 3, 4; CHANTICLEER, 
3; Dean's List. 



Gibbons 



Gidney 



Gillies 



Gil 





67 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Don Glass 

Johnstown, Pa. 

General 

University of Pittsburgh, 1, 2; 
Assistant Manager Wresthng, 3, 
Manager, 4; Columbia Literary 
Society; Band, 3, 4; Symphony 
Orchestra, 4. 



Page Gooch 

Henderson, N. C. 
General 
Kappa Delta. 



David Watson Goddard 

Portsmouth, Ohio 

Pre- Medical 

Phi Kappa Psi; Band, 1, 2, 3; 
Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
Glee Club, 1, 2; Football, 1. 



Evelyn G. Goode 

Statesville, N. C. 

Social Service 

Kappa Delta; Converse Col- 
lege, 1, 2; Dean's List. 



Glass 
Gooch 



Goddard 
Goode 



Jane Goode 

Lincolnton, N. C. 

General 

Alpha Delta Pi; Greensboro College, 1, 2; Trans- 
fer Adviser, 4. 



Mary Kay Goodman 

Ashland, Ky. 

Chemistry 

Delta Delta Delta; Sandals; Social Standards, 2; 
Women's Student Council, 2, 3; CHANTICLEER, 
2, 3, 4, Co-ed Editor, 4; Student Forum Committee, 
4; Pegram Chemistry Club; Duke Players, 3. 



Joseph Roland Goode, Jr. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Business Administration 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Com- 
mencement Marshal, 3; University Choir, 1, 2; 
Assistant Baseball Manager, 1, 2, 3. 



Robert Walton Goodwin 

Norway, Maine 
Business Administration 

Delta Tau Delta; CHANTICLEER, 1; Track, 1. 



Jane Goode 



J. R. Goode 



Goodman 



Goodwin 



1 




68 



J 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Dorothy Fairfield Gray 

Summit, N. J. 

Business Administration 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Wom- 
en's Athletic Association Board, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 3; Sandals; 
White Duchy; Delta Phi Rho 
Alpha; Junior Big Sisters, Class 
Vice President, 4. 



Edv^ard Lee Gray 

Bahama, N. C. 
General 



Chris Greutker 

Kenmore, N. Y. 
General 

Tennis, 1. 



Richard P. Griffin 

Swarthmore, Pa. 

General 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Glee 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir, 2, 3, 4; 
Track, 1; Columbia Literary So- 
ciety; Chronicle, 1, 2. 




Dorothy Gray 
Greutker 



E. L. Gray 

Griffin 



George Edwin Griscom 

Trenton, N. J. 
Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma; Soccer, 3, 4. 



Mary Rebecca Groves 

Charleston, W. Va. 
Teaching 
Beaver College, 1; Polity Club. 



Jane Haislip 

Lumberport, W. Va. 

General 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Phi Beta Kappa; Freshman 
Honors; Sandals; Freshman Adviser, 3; Women's 
Student Government, 4; White Duchy; Music 
Study Club; Eko-L; Dean's List; Brown House 
President. 

Irwin Read Hale 

Greenfield, Mass. 

General 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Beta Kap- 
pa; Basketball, 1; Track, 1, 2, 3; Wrestling, 4; 
French Club; Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 4; 
Dean's List. 



Griscom 



Groves 



Haislip 



Hale 





69 



THE 



CHANTICLEER 




.^l^X 



Betty Halsema 

Baguio, Philippine Islands 

General 

Alpha Phi; Pi Mu Epsilon; So- 
cial Standards, 3; Sorority Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 2, 3; League 
of Women Voters, Treasurer, 2, 
Vice President, 3; Eko-L; 
Dean's List. 



Sue Hardy 

Rome, Ga. 

Social Service 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Shorter 
College, 1, 2; Dean's List. 



Henry Grady Hardin 

Columbia, S. C. 

Religion 

Sigma Chi; Archive, 1, 2; 
Sophomore "Y" Council; Un- 
dergraduate Ministerial Fellow- 
ship. 



Christine Elizabeth Harris 

Coral Gables, Fla. 

General 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Flor- 
ida State College, 1, 2; Dean's 
List. 



Halsema 
Hardy 



Hardin 
Harris 



Henry Laurens Harris 

Albemarle, N. C. 

Honors 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Phi Beta Kappa; Beta Omega 
Sigma; Chronicle, 1, 2; Assistant Boxing Manager, 
1, 2; Dean's List. 



John Reynolds Hathorn 

Ballston Spa, N. Y. 

General 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Beta Omega Sigma; Basket- 
ball, 1; Track, 1; Pan-Hellenic Council. 



James M. Hatch 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Pre-Medical 

Sigma Nu; Phi Eta Sigma; Dean's List. 



Nancy Grimes Haywood 

Concord, N. C. 

Teaching 

Kappa Delta Pi; Converse College, 1, 2; Dean's 
List. 



Harris 



Hatch 



Hathorn 



Haywood 




70 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Mary Ada Heard 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 
General 
Zeta Tau Alpha. 



William Nason Heffner 

Northport, N. Y. 
Pre- Medical 

New York University, 1. 



Margaret C. Helvenston 

Ocala, Fla. 

General 

Delta Delta Delta; Oberlin 
College, 1, 2, 3; Music Study 
Club, 4; Nereidian Club, 4; Glee 
Club, 4; Dean's List. 



Hayward Webb Henderson 

Lynchburg, Va. 

General 

Pi Mu Epsilon; Lynchburg 
College, 1, 2; Musical Clubs, 3, 
4; Quartet, 3, 4; Choir, 4; Glee 
Club, 3, 4. 




Heard 
Helvenston 



Heffner 
Henderson 



Martha B. Henderson 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
General 

Alpha Delta Pi; Tufts College, 1, 2. 



Mary Elliott Henderson 

Hickory, N. C. 

General 

Alpha Delta Pi; Chronicle 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-ed 
Editor, 4; CHANTICLEER, 3; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 
3; May Day Committee, 3; White Duchy; Dean's 
List. 



Martha Henderson Mary Henderson 



John Hennemier 

Savannah, Ga. 

Business Administration 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Tombs 
Secretary, 4. 



James E. Henry 

Nazareth, Pa. 

General 

Phi Kappa Psi; Basketball, Assistant Man 
ager, 1, 2; Junior Council, 3; Pan-Hellenic Coun 
cil, 3, 4; Class Vice President, 4. 



Hennemier 



Henry 





71 



THE 



CHANTICLEER 




Thomas W. Herb 

Wyomissing, Pa. 

Business Administration 

Delta Sigma Phi; Phi Eta Sig- 
ma; Band, 1, 2; Orchestra, 1, 2. 



Vincent P. Hippolitus 

New Haven, Conn. 
General 

Phi Kappa Sigma. 



Joseph S. Hiatt, Jr. 

Lenoir, N. C. 

Pre- Medical 

Delta Sigma Phi; Kappa Kap- 
pa Psi; Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 
4; Band, 3, 4; Archive, 2, 3, 4; 
Junior Council; Senior Council; 
Class Secretary, 4; Commence- 
ment Marshal, 3; President, 
Seventh District of Kappa Kappa 
Psi. 



William Sabine Hodde 

Highland Park, Mich. 

Pre -Legal 

Highland Park Junior Col- 
lege, 1; Basketball, 2, 3. 



Herb Hiatt 

Hippolitus Hodde 



William L. Holler 

Columbia, S. C. 

General 

Debating, 1; Columbia Literary Society, Secre- 
tary, 2, President, 3; Archive, 1, 2, 3, 4, Associate 
Editor, 2, 3, Managing Editor, 4; Chronicle, 1, 2, 
3, 4. 



Richard Emmett Horton 

PeekskiU, N. Y. 
Pre-Legal 
Pi Kappa Phi; Dean's List. 



Edward Thompson Howard 

Lexington, Mass. 
Pre-Medical 



E. M. Hoyle 

Durham, N. C. 
Religion 



Holle 



Horton 



Howard 



Hoyle 



^, 




72 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Robert Turner Hoyle 

Durham, N. C. 
General 

Classical Club. 



Nancy Hudson 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Honors 

Chi Delta Phi; President, 3, 4; 
Phi Beta Kappa; Duke Players, 
1; Distaff, 1, 2; Archive, 2, 3, 4, 
Co-ed Editor, 3, 4; Glee Club, 
1; Dean's List; Eko-L. 



W. L. Huiskamp 

Keokuk, Iowa 

Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma; Omicron Delta 
Kappa; Red Friars; Baseball, 1, 
2, 3, 4, Captain, 4; Basketball, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Tombs; Class Treasurer, 3. 



Porter B. Huling, Jr. 

Williamsport, Pa. 

Business Administration 

Sigma Nu; Band, 1, 2, 3; Sym- 
phony Orchestra, 2, 3; Glee 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Wrestling, 2. 



Alma Hull 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

General 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Hood College, 1; Y. W. C, A. 
Cabinet, 3, President, 4. 



John William Hulme, Jr. 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
Pre -Legal 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Dean's List. 



Hull 



Hull 





Lucille Ivey 

Hickory, N. C. 

Teaching 

Davenport College, 1; Greensboro College, 2; 
Women's College Orchestra. 



Pi Beta Phi; Junior Big Sisters, President; Soror- 
ity Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 4, Treasurer, 4; Wom- 
en's Student Council, 4; Social Standards, 2, 3, 4, 
Chairman, 4; Town Girls' Club; Dean's List. 



L. Ivey 



73 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Margaret Izard 

Durham, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Polity Club; Town Girls' 
Club. 



Hortense Jacobus 

Caldwell, N. J. 
General 



Rolf Johnson 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Pre- Medical 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Pegram 
Chemistry Club; Swimming, 1, 
2, 3; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3. 



James Henry Johnston 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

General 

Beta Omega Sigma; Red 
Friars; Tombs; Football, 1, 2, 3, 
4, Captain, 4; Wrestling, 1. 



Izard 



Jacobus 

J. Johnston 



Alice Jones 

Petersburg, Va. 
General 

3u Alpha; Duke Players. 



Anne Jones 

Birmingham, Aid. 
Social Service 

Alpha Theta; Shorter College, 1, 2. 




Sara L. Jordan 

York, Pa. 
General 

Kappa Delta; Sandals; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Sidney L. Kauffman 

Swarthmore, Pa. 

Civil Engineering 

American Society of Civil Engineers; Engineers' 
Club. 



Anne Jones 



Jordan 



Kauffman 




74 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Frederic R. Keator 

Wayne, Pa. 

Business Administration 

Sigma Chi; Tombs; Manager 
Track, 4. 



Gilbert Keith 

Wilmette, 111. 

General 

Phi Delta Theta; Beta Omega 
Sigma, President, 2. 



Fred N. Kellmeyer 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

Business Adnninistration 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Tennis, 
1, 3, 4. 



Claire Kennedy 

Big Stone Gap, Va. 
General 
Forum Club: Debating Club. 




Keith 
Kennedy 



Roy C. Kimmerle 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Business Administration 

Pi Kappa Phi; Basketball, 1; Track, 1; Glee Club, 
1, 2. 



John Belding King 

Cristobal, Canal Zone 

Mechanical Engineering 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers; 
Duke Engineers Society; Cosmopolitan Club; 
Dean's List. 



Keator 
Kellmeyer 

Evelyn Katherine Kleinmans 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

General 

Social Standards, 3, 4; May Day Committee, 
3; Freshman Adviser, 4; Dean's List. 



William N. Klove 

Oak Park, 111. 

Pre-Legal 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Chronicle, 1; Class Pres 
ident, 2; Junior Council; Senior Council. 



Ki 



immerle 



King 



Klei 



inmans 



Klove 





75 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Dallas Knight 

Ambler, Pa. 

General 

Sigma Kappa; Social Stand- 
ards, 2, 3, 4; Junior Big Sisters, 
Vice President, 3; Freshman 
Adviser, 3; CHANTICLEER, 1, 
2, 3, 4, Co-ed Business Man- 
ager, 4; Student Council, 4; 
White Duchy. 



Donald M. Kramer 

Reading, Pa. 
Business Administration 

Delta Sigma Phi; Orchestra. 



Al Konopka 

Camden, N. J. 

Pre-Medical 

Football, 1; Basketball, 1; 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Beta Omega 
Sigma; Tombs. 



Lloyd Kraushaar 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Pre-Legal 

Pi Kappa Phi; Football, 1; 
Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming, 1, 
2; Wrestling, 3, 4; Soccer, 4; 
Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; 
Senior Council. 



Knight 
Kramer 




Konopka 
Kraushaar 



Charles R. Kunkle 

Johnstown, Pa. 
Pre-Legal 



Sigma Chi; Red Friars; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Tombs, President, 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4, Cap- 
tain, 4; Track, 1, 2; Tennis, 1; Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil, 3, 4; Omicron Delta Kappa, President, 4; 
Student Council, 3. 



Raymond W. Laird 

Gulfport, Miss. 

General 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 



David W. Lamb 

Rochester, N. Y. 

General 

Sigma Chi; Centre College, 1, 
Baseball, 4. 



2; Soccer, 4; 



Gene Martin Laney 

Sanford, Fla. 

General 

Delta Delta Delta; Wesleyan College, 1, 2; 
Chronicle, 3, 4; Duke Players, 4; Transfer Adviser; 
Dean's List. 



Kunkle 



Laird 



Lamb 



Laney 




76 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



June Langfitt 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 

General 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Deni- 
son University, 1, 2; Junior 
Council; Sorority Pan-Hellenic 
Council, 3, 4, President, 4. 



Arthur Carl Lee, Jr. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

General 

Alpha Tau Omega; Footbal 
Manager, 4; Tombs. 



Charles Loring Lemperly 

Lakewood, Ohio 
Business Administration 

Senior Council; Dean's List. 



William A. Lewis 

Durham, N. C. 
Law 
Kappa Alpha. 




Helen Josephine Lieb 

Elizabeth, N. J. 

General 

Delta Delta Delta; Chronicle, 1; Glee Club, 1; 
Polity Club; CHANTICLEER, 1. 



John Francis Litle 

Washington, Pa. 

General 

Kappa Sigma; Boxing Manager, 4; Tombs; 
Dean's List. 



Langfitt 
Lemperly 

Gretchen Little 

High Bridge, N. J. 

General 

Sandals; Women's Athletic Association Board, 
2, 3, 4; Student Government, 3; Jarvis House 
President; Pegram Chemistry Club. 

Robert A. Little 

Lincolnton, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Kappa Kappa Psi; Glee Club, 1, 2; Choir, 1, 2; 
Band, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Lee 
Lewis 



Lieb 



Litle 



G. Little 



R. Little 





77 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Robert S. Long 
Frankford, Del. 
Pre-Medical 

Sigma Nu; Track, 1. 



James Russell Lowe 

Elon College, N. C. 
Teaching 

Polity Club, 3, 4. 



William O. Luly 

Vero Beach, Fla. 
Pre-Medical 

Pi Kappa Phi. 



Stephen Stringer Lush 

Mahwah, N. J. 

Business Administration 

Beta Omega Sigma; Football, 
1; Track, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Long LoAwe 

Luly Lush 



Alan M. MacQuarrie 

Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Pre-Legal 

Delta Sigma Phi; Cross-Country, 1; Chronicle, 
1, 2; Y. M. C. A., 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 3, Presi- 
dent, 4; Dean's List. 



Bion William MacWhirter 

Charlotte, N. C. 

General 

Pi Mu Epsilon; Columbia Literary Society; Dean's 
List. 



Dick McAninch 

Marion, Ohio 

General 

Kappa Sigma; Beta Omega Sigma; Freshman 
Council; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 1, 3; Base- 
ball, 1; Track, 1, 2, 3; House of Representatives, 
1; Tombs. 

Jim McCall 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

General 

Kappa Alpha; Omicron Delta Kappa; Red Friars; 
Beta Omega Sigma; Boxing, 2, 3, 4; Tombs; Pan- 
Hellenic Council, President, 4. 



MacQuarrie 



MacWhirter 



McAninch 



McCall 



I 




78 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Charles M. McCallister 

Youngstown, Ohio 

General 

Youngstown College, 1, 2; 
Duke Players, 3, 4, President, 
4; Dean's List. 



John R. McClain 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
General 



Saniuel G. McCaskill 

Camden, S. C. 
General 

Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Tombs. 



Marian McClenaghan 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Social Service 

Kappa Kappa Gamma. 




McCallister 
McClain 



McCaskill 
McClenaghan 



John R. McCrary 

Lexington, N. C. 
General 

Alpha Tau Omega; Chronicle, 1. 



Robert Fremont McKinney 

Scranton, Pa. 
Pre-Medical 

Glee Club, 3, 4; Choir, 3, 4; Orchestra, 3. 



Myles Francis McGrail 

Brookline, Mass. 

Pre-Legal 

Tombs; Beta Omega Sigma; Football, 1, 
Wrestling, 1, 2, 3, 4; Track, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Cole McMartin, Jr. 

Des Moines, Iowa 

General 

Alpha Tau Omega; Theta Alpha Phi; Drake 
University, 1, 2; Duke Players, 3, 4, Vice Pres- 
ident, 4. 



McCrary 



McGrail 



McKinney 



McMartin 




79 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Samuel G. McQuade 

Morristown, N. J. 

Pre-Forestry 

Freshman Council; Engi- 
neers' Club. 



Alphonso Mann, Jr. 

Durham, N. C. 

General 

Boxing, 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain, 
4; Southern Conference Boxing 
Champion, 3; Tombs. 



Paul Maness 

Yanceyviile, N. C. 

Pre-Medical 

Wofford College, 1; Sopho- 
more "Y" Council; Dean's List. 



John E. Mann 

Greenwood, Miss. 
General 

Sigma Chi; Dean's List. 



McQuade 
A. Mann 



Maness 
J. Mann 



O. DeWitt Mann, II 

Whitakers, N. C. 

General 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 3; 
Archive, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Frank E. Mazuy 

Newton, N. J. 
Business Administration 

Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Lylton E. Maxwell 

Pink Hill, N. C. 
Pre-Legal 



Dean's List. 



B. Frank Meacham 

Roberdell, N. C. 

Religion 

Boxing, 1, 2; Undergraduate Ministerial Asso- 
ciation, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



O. Mann 



t 



Maxwell 



Mazuy 



Meacham 




80 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Rachel Meetze 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Teaching 

Phi Mu; Sandals; Polity Club; 
Women's College Orchestra, 1, 
2, 3, 4, President, 2, 4; Music 
Study Club, Secretary, 3; Soror- 
ity Pan-Hellenic Council, 2, 3, 
4; Dean's List. 



Robert C. Mervine 

East Orange, N. J. 

Business Administration 

Delta Sigma Phi; Omicron 
Delta Kappa; Tombs; Student 
Council; Head Cheer Leader, 2, 
3; Swimming, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 
4; Commencement Marshal, 3; 
Sophomore Council; Duke Play- 
ers. 



Robert M. Meiklejohn, Jr. 

Westfield, N. J. 

Civil Engineering 

American Society of Civil 
Engineers. 



James B. Messick 

Smyrna, Del. 

Pre-Legal 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Track, 1; 
House of Representatives, 3. 




Edward Joseph Migdal 

Erie, Pa. 
Pre-Medical 

Beta Omega Sigma; Football, 1, 2; Track, L 



Robert P. Miller 

Lincolnton, N. C. 

Pre-Medical 

Sigma Nu; Kappa Kappa Psi, President, 3, 4; 
Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2; Symphony Or- 
chestra, 1, 2; Beta Omega Sigma; Commencement 
Marshal, 3. 



Meetze 
Mervine 



Margaret W. Moore 

Clarendon, Va. 

Business Administration 

Delta Delta Delta; Chronicle, 1, 
CHANTICLEER, 4; Dean's List. 



Ernest Thompson Moorey 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Civil Engineering 

American Society of Civil Engineers. 



Meiklejohn 
Messick 



Migdal 



Miller 



Mc 



Moorey 





81 



THE CHANTICLEER 




George L. Morelock, Jr. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

General 

Kappa Sigma; Pan-Hellenic 
Council; Trident Club, 1, 2. 



Emmy Lou Morton 

Charleston, W. Va. 

General 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Sorority Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 3, 4; Social 
Standards, 1, 3; Sandals; Class 
President, 3; Dean's List. 



Robert Moon Morris 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

General 

CHANTICLEER, 2; Glee 
Club, 1; Undergraduate Minis- 
terial Fellowship, 1, 2; Classical 
Club, Treasurer, 2; Columbia 
Literary Society, \, 2, 3, 4; Sec- 
retary, 3; President, 3; Senior 
Council; Debating, 3, 4. 



Rom F. Moser 

Zebulon, N. C. 

General 

Kappa Kappa Psi; Band, 2, 3, 
4; Columbia Literary Society, 1, 
2, Secretary, 2; Football, 1. 



Morelock 
Morton 


Morris 
Moser 






John E. 


Moss 




Mobile, 


Ala. 




Pre-Medical 


Sigma Nu; 


Pan-Hellenic 


Council 



Eugene Hyatt Mossburg 

Chevy Chase, Md. 

Pre-Legal 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Omicron Delta Kappa; Red 
Friars; Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; Assistant Man- 
ager Basketball, 1, 2, 3, Manager, 4; CHANTL 
CLEER, 1, 2, 3, 4, Business Manager, 4; Track, 1; 
Junior Council; Publications Board, 4. 



Mary Avon Motlow 

Lynchburg, Tenn. 
General 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Ward-Belmont, 1, 2. 

Thomas T. Munson 

Detroit, Mich. 
Pre-Legal 

Sigma Nu; Wayne University, 1, 2. 



Mc 



Mossburg 



Motlow 



Munson 





A^ 




82 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Thomas Jones Murray 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

General 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Freshman 
Council; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Chronicle, 1; Archive, 1; Sopho- 
more Council; Junior Council; 
Trident Club; Intramural Sports 
Manager, 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming, 
1; Wrestling, 1; Class Treasurer, 
4; Publications Board, 4. 



Peter Ernest Naktenis 

Hartford, Conn. 

General 

Delta Sigma Phi; Phi Eta Sig- 
ma; Pi Mu Epsilon; Omicron 
Delta Kappa; Basketball, 1, 3; 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Tombs; 
Beta Omega Sigma; Athletic 
Council; Dean's List. 



George Wesley Nance 

Asheville, N. C. 

General 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Glee Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Choir, 2, 3, 4. 



Norman Nathanson 

Long Branch, N. J. 
Pre- Medical 

Delta Phi Alpha; Iota Gamma 



Pi; Pegram 
Dean's List. 



Chemistry Club; 



Dorothy Louise Neff 

Washington, D. C. 
General 

Delta Delta Delta; Duke Players, 3, 4. 



Malcolm Newbold, Jr. 

Manhasset, N. Y. 

Pre-Medical 

Columbia Literary Society; Glee Club, I, 2, 4; 
Choir, I, 2. 



Neff 



Newbold 



Newsom 




Annie Laurie Newsom 

Durham, N. C. 

General 

Alpha Delta Pi; Phi Beta Kappa; Class President, 
I, 2; Chronicle, Co-ed Editor, 2; Sandals; Women's 
Student Government, 3, 4, Assistant Treasurer, 3, 
President, 4; White Duchy; Polity Club; N. C. F. S„ 
Treasurer; Dean's List. 

Douglas S. Nisbet 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pre-Medical 

Iota Gamma Pi; Pegram Chemistry Club; Fresh- 
man Council; Sophomore "Y" Council; Dean's 
List. 



Nisbet 




THE 



CHANTICLEER 




Herbert S. Nusbaum 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Honors 

Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Beta 
Kappa; Duke Players, 2, 3, 4; 
Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
Archive, 1, 2, Associate Editor, 
2; Musical Club Key Award, 3; 
Beta Omega Sigma Scholastic 
Gold "D"; Dean's List. 



Jean W. Ogburn 

Dover, Del. 

General 

Glee Club, 1, 2; Band, 1, 3, 
4; Baseball, 1, 3, 4. 



Edgar J. Oliver, Jr. 

Savannah, Ga. 

General 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Virginia 
Military Institute, 1; French 
Club. 



James W. Ouzts 

Marion, N. C. 
Business Administration 

Alpha Tau Omega. 



Nusbaum 
Oliver 



Ogburn 
Ouzts 



Sarah Ann Overshiner 

Hopkinsville, Ky. 
Pre-Legal 
Pi Beta Phi. 



William G. Owens 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Honors 



Hugh A. Page, Jr. 

Clayton, N. C. 
Pre-Legal 

Delta Sigma Phi; Polity Club; Trident Club. 

Jack Ward Page 

Rowland, N. C. 
Religion 



Dean's List. 



Overshiner 



Owens 



H. Page 



J. Page 





84 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Frances Paist 

Wayne, Pa. 

Social Service 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Glee Club, 2, 
3, 4; Choir, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List. 



John B. Paist, Jr. 

Lansdowne, Pa. 

Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma; Cross-Country, 
1, 2; Track, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



J. R. Pankey 

Bluefield, W. Va. 

Pre-Legal 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Theta 
Alpha Phi; Duke Players, 1, 2, 
3, 4, 



Charlotte Evelyn Parker 

El Paso, Texas 
Pre-Medical 






F. Paist 
Pankey 


Elizabeth Jane Parks 


Helen Louise Parsons 


Kew Gardens, N. Y. 


Altoona, Pa. 


General 


Social Sevrice 


Kappa Kappa Gamma; Sandals; Glee Club, I, 2; 
)istaff, 1, 2. 


Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dean's List. 


George R. Parrish, Jr. 


Thomas C. Parsons 


San Antonio, Texas 


Altoona, Pa. 


Pre-Legal 


General 


Sigma Nu. 


Sigma Chi; Beta Omega Sigma; Te 



4, Captain, 4; Tombs 



Parks 



Parrish 



H. Parsons 





85 



THE 



CHANTICLEER 




Ruth Eleonora Patterson 

Durham, N. C. 

Social Service 

Music Study Club; Glee Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Business Manager, 4; 
Choir, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Douglas Bernhard Paulsen 

Baldwin, N. Y. 
Civil Engineering 



Ernestine Paul 

Colmar, Pa. 

General 

Phi Beta Kappa; Kappa Delia 
Pi; Eko-L; Music Study Club; 
Glee Club, 4; University Choir, 
4; Dean's List. 



Walter Price Payne, Jr. 

Milford, Conn. 
General 
Football, 1. 



Patterson 
Paulsen 



Frances Elizabeth Pearson 

Sanford, Fla. 

Social Service 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Woman's College of Alabama, 
2; Chronicle, 3. 



Robert L. Peck 

Binghampton, N. Y. 

General 

Keys Club; Phi Eta Sigma; Pegram Chemistry 
Club; Freshman Council; Sophomore "Y" Coun- 
cil; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 3; Band, 1, 2, 3; Symphony 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Cross-Country, 1, 2; Dean's 
List. 



Dorothy Peck 

Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 
Social Service 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Beaver College, 1, 2. 



Cecil M. Peek 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 
General 
Phi Eta Sigma; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3. 



Pearsor 



D. Peck 



R. Peck 



Peek 




86 



DUKE 



UNIVERSITY 



Marie Kollen Pelgrim 

Coral Gables, Fla. 

Teaching 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Kappa 
Delta Pi; Glee Club, 1, 2; Duke 
Players, 1; Miami University, 3; 
Dean's List. 



Clifford W. Perry 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

General 

Phi Delta T h e t a ; Omicron 
Delta Kappa; Beta Omega Sig- 
ma; Golf, 1, 2, 3, 4; Tombs; 
Student Council; Southern Con- 
ference Golf Champion, 2, State 
Champion, 2; Dean's List. 



Clary Webb Peoples 

Asheville, N. C. 

General 

Delta Delta Delta; Women's 
Student Council, 4; Dean's List. 



Ruth Phillips 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

Social Service 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; San- 
dals; Class Treasurer, 3; Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinet, 3; Junior Coun- 
cil; Social Service Conference, 
Secretary, 3, President, 4; 
Women's Athletic Association 
Board, 4; Class President, 4; 
President's Club, 4, President, 
4; May Day Committee, 2. 




Elizabeth Wright Pierce 

Weldon, N. C. 
General 

Alpha Delta Pi; National Park Seminary, 1, 2. 

Nettie Pinnix 

New Bern, N. C. 
General 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Duke Players, 2, 3, 4. 



Pelgrim 
Perry 



Ella Pearl Pinson 

Hapeville, Ga. 
General 

Wesleyan College, 1, 2. 



Richard C. Piper 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

Business Administration 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Chronicle, 1, 2, Sports Edi 
tor, 3; Tennis, 1; CHANTICLEER, Sports Editor, 4 



Peoples 
Phillips 



Pierce 



Pii 



Piper 





87 



THE CHANTICLEER 




John H. Plump 

Pearl River, N. Y. 

Business Administration 

Delta Tau Delta; Delta Phi 
Alpha; Glee Club; Track, 1, 2, 
3; Pan-Hellenic Council, 4. 



Mem Plyler 

Durham, N. C. 

General 

Kappa Delta; Social Stand- 
ards Committee, 4; Pan-Hellenic 
Council, 3, 4; Town Girls' Club, 
Treasurer, 3, Vice President, 4; 
Duke Players, 4. 




Herbert A. Pohl 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Honors 

Sigma Pi Sigma; Phi Eta Sig- 
ma; Delta Phi Alpha; Pi Mu 
Epsilon; Phi Beta Kappa; Peg- 
ram Chemistry Club; Glee 
Club; Choir; Open Forum Bible 
Class, President, 2; 9019; Iota 
Gamma Pi; Dean's List. 



Harriette Violetta Pollard 

Washington, D. C. 
General 



Plump 
Pohl 




Plyler 
Pollard 



Joe G. Powell 

Moorestown, N. J. 

General 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Track, 1; Golf, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Class Vice President, 3; Tombs; Trident Club, 
Secretary, 3; Junior Council; Senior Council; De- 
bating. 

Rufus Heflin Powell, III 

Durham, N. C. 



Honors 

Delta Sigma Phi; Beta Omega Sigma; Debate 
Council; Class Vice President, 2; Winner Fresh- 
man Oratorical Contest; Debating, 3; Columbia Lit- 
erary Society; Sophomore "Y" Council; Dean's 
List. 



Alan Christian Puryear 

Washington, D. C. 

Business Administration 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Glee Club, 1; Pan-Hellenic 
Council, 3, 4, Vice President, 4. 



Kathryn Queen 

Waynesville, N. C. 

Pre-Legal 

League of Women Voters, 1, 2; Polity Club; 
Debating Club, 3; Debating, 3. 



J. Powell 



R. Powell 



Puryear 



Queen 




88 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Genevieve Ramsaur 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

General 

Chi Omega; Florida State 
College, 1, 2; Social Standards 
Committee; Dean's List. 



Mary Alice Rhodes 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

General 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Phi Beta 
Kappa; Freshman Honors; Soph- 
omore Honors; Chronicle, 1, 2; 
Forum Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres- 
ident, 4; Polity Club; Eko-L, 
President, 4; CHANTICLEER, 
Assistant Co-ed Editor, 4; Pres- 
ident's Club, 4; Dean's List. 



Catherine Rankin 

Mount Gilead, N, C. 

Teaching 

Alpha Phi; Peace Junior Col- 
lege, 1, 2; Glee Club, 3, 4, 
Treasurer, 4; Music Study Club, 
Treasurer, 4; Choir, 3, 4. 



G. D. Richardson 

Ashland, Ky. 

Business Administration 

Pi Kappa Alpha; CHANTI- 
CLEER, 4. 



M 


D 







Rankin 
Richardson 



McMurry S. Richey 

San Benito, Texas 

Religion 

Phi Theta Kappa; Pi Gamma Mu; Brownsville 
Junior College, 1, 2; Undergraduate Ministerial 
Fellowship, President, 3, 4; Fellowship for World 
Peace, President, 4; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 4; Dean's 
List. 

William P. Ricks 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 
General 

Phi Delta Theta; Cross-Country, 2. 



Ramsaur 
Rhodes 



Helen W. Rigg 

Wayne, Pa. 
Social Service 

Glee Club: University Choir. 



Henry Schroder Robinson 

Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Honors 

Phi Beta Kappa; Classical Club, President, 4; 
9019, President, 4; Freshman Honors; Sophomore 
Honors; Dean's List. 



Richey 



Ricks 



Rigg 



Robi 





89 



THE 



CHANTICLEER 




Ralph Leon Rockett 

Gastonia, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Delta Sigma Phi; Tennis, 3, 4. 



Marion Roe 

Clermont, Fla. 

Social Service 

Phi Mu; Phi Beta Kappa; Glee 
Club, 1, 2; Choir, 1, 2; Music 
Study Club; Polity Club; Eko-L, 
Secretary-Treasurer; Dean's 
List. 



John S. Ross 

Queens Village, N. Y. 

Pre-Medical 

Phi Kappa Psi; Swimming, 1, 
2, 3; Pegram Chemistry Club. 



Harry Roush 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Pre-Legal 

Phi Eta Sigma; Symphony Or- 
chestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's List. 




Roe 
Roush 



Margaret Lavinia Rudisill 

Cherryville, N. C. 

Teaching 

Delta; Lenoir-Rhyne College, 1. 



William H. Rue 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
General 



Chi. 



Earle I. Runner, II 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

General 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Sigma Upsilon, President, 4; 
Archive, 1, 2, 3, 4, Editor, 4; Chronicle, 2, 3; 
Duke Players. 



Robert H. Rushnaer 

Johnson City, N. Y. 

Electrical Engineering 

Sigma Pi Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon; Iota Gamma 
Pi; Delta Epsilon Sigma; American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers; Dean's List. 



Rudisill 



Runner 



Rushmer 




90 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Philip M. Russell 

Durham, N. C. 

Pre-Legal 

Kappa Alpha; Omicron Delta 
Kappa; Archive, I, 2, 3, 4, Busi- 
ness Manager, 4; Beta Omega 
Sigma, Treasurer, 2; Sophomore 
Council, 2; Class Secretary, 3; 
Junior Council; Assistant Boxing 
Manager, 1, 2, Manager, 3, 4 
Tombs; Publications Board, 4 
Commencement Marshal, 3 
North Carolina Collegiate Press 
Association Treasurer, 4; 
CHANTICLEER, 4. 



William A. Sager 

Haqerstown, Md. 
Business Administration 

Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Robert T. Rutherford 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Pre-Medical 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Delta Phi 
Alpha; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
List. 



David N. Saleeby 

Monroe, N. C. 

Pre-Medical 

Pegram Chemistry Club, 
Dean's List. 




Frank G. Satterfield, Jr. 

Durham, N. C. 

Pre-Legal 

Pi Kappa Phi; Tau Kappa Alpha; Winner Intra- 
mural Oratorical Contest, 3, 4; Wrestling, 2; De- 
bating Team. 

Fan Scales 

Stoneville, N. C. 
General 
Salem College, 1, 2. 



Russell 
Sager 



Joe Andrew Scales 

Monroe, N. C. 
Business Administration 

Football, i. 



Robert E. Scattergood 

Burlington, N. I. 

Electrical Engineering 

Pi Mu Epsilon, Vice President 4: American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineering, Vice President; Iota 
Gamma Pi, Vice President; Sophomore Honors; 
Delta Epsilon Sigma, Secretary-Treasurer; Dean's 
List. 



Rutherford 
Saleeby 



Satterfield 



F. Scales 



J. Scales 



Scattergood 





91 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Edwin H. Schaeffer 

Roselle Park, N, J, 

Civil Engineering 

Pi Mu Epsilon, President; Del- 
ta Epsilon Sigma; Iota Gamma 
Pi; Symphony Orchestra, I, 2, 
3; American Society of Civil 
Engineers; Dean's List. 



Daniel B. Schafer 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Business Administration 

Phi Delta Theta; Swimming, 
3; Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 4; 
Senior Council. 



Evalyn Schaffle 

Asheville, N. C. 

Teaching 

Theta Alpha Phi; Sandals; 
Nereidian Club, Secretary, 2, 
President, 4; Duke Players, 1, 2, 
3, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3; Pres- 
ident's Club. 



Herbert Theodore Schnninke 

Ridqewood, N. J. 
Business Administration 

Dean's List. 



Shaeffer 
Schaffle 



Schafer 
Schminke 



Donald Schmitt 

White Plains, N. Y. 
Teaching 
Boxing, 3, 4; Glee Club, 2, 3, 4. 



Carl H. SchneeTweiss 

Clifton, N. J. 
General 




Emil Lee Schuerman 

Leonardo, N. J. 

Mechanical Engineering 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Iota 
Gamma Pi; Dean's List. 



Anne McElroy Scott 

Waco, Texas 
General 
Pi Beta Phi; Baylor University, 1, 2, 3. 



Sch 



neeweiss 



Schuerman 



Scott 




92 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Mary Covington Secrest 

Monroe, N. C. 

Teaching 

Chi Delta Phi; Meredith Col- 
lege, 1, 2; Archive, 4; Chron- 
icle, 4. 



Thomas Duncan Sellers 

Norfolk Va. 

Pre-Medical 

Kappa Sigma; College of Wil- 
liam and Mary, 1, 2; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet, 3, 4; Trident Club, 3; 
Dean's List. 



Harry Wells Severance 

Lake City, S. C. 

Business Administration 

Delta Sigma Phi; Baseball, I; 
Columbia Literary Society; Glee 
Club, 1. 



Garfield Shafer, Jr. 

Norfolk, Va. 
Pre-Legal 

Kappa Sigma. 




John Joseph Shortell 

Hartford, Conn. 

General 

Delta Sigma Phi; Baseball, I, 2, 3, 4; Basket- 
ball, I; Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; House of Rep- 
resentatives, 3. 

Frances Isobel Shriner 

York, Pa. 

General 

Delta Delta Delta; Phi Beta Kappa; Eko-L; 
Music Study Club, President, 4; Chronicle, I, 2, 
3, 4, Co-ed Literary Editor, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2; 
Chapel Choir, 1, 2; Polity Club; Duke Players, 1, 
2, 3, 4, Secretary, 4. 



Secrest 
Severance 

Eleanor Lane Silleck 

Peekskill, N. Y. 

General 

Delta Phi Alpha; Chronicle, 1; Glee Club, 3, 4; 
Choir, 3, 4; Music Study Club; Dean's List. 



Patti Marie Sills 

Nashville, N. C. 

Pre-Medical 

Delta Delta Delta; Delta Phi Alpha; Pegram 
Chemistry Club; Socials Standards, 4. 



Shortell 



Shr 



Silleck 



Sillc 





93 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Paul E. Simpson 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

Pre-Medical 

Glee Club, 1, 2; Choir, 1, 2; 
Track, 1; Basketball, 1; Pegram 
Chemistry Club. 



Charles T. Sinclair, Jr. 

Carthage, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Chronicle, 
I; Commencement Marshal, 3. 



Rachael Christine Sink 

Lexington, N. C. 
Teaching 

Phi Mu; Pohty Club. 



Frank Sizemore 

High Point, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Phi Delta T h e t a ; Omicron 
Delta Kappa; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Beta Omega Sigma; Red Friars; 
Football, 1, 2; Track, 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Co-Captain, 4; Athletic Coun- 
cil, 2; Class President, 4; Dean's 
List. 



Caleb Van Wyck Smith, Jr. 

Rockville Centre, N. Y. 
Business Administration 

Phi Kappa Psi; Alpha Kappa Psi. 



E. Walter Smith 

Memphis, Tenn. 

General 

Ministerial Association; Glee Club, 2, 3; Dean's 
List. 



Walter A. Smith 

Staten Island, N. Y. 

General 

Kappa Alpha; University of Arizona, 1, 2; Band, 
3, 4. 



William Travis Smithdeal, Jr. 

Richmond, Va. 

Business Administration 

Delta Sigma Phi; Swimming, 2, 3, 4; Cross- 
country, 2; Dean's List. 



C. Smith 



E. Smith 



W. Smith 



Smithdeal 



1- 




94 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



F. Colton Somers, III 

Haddonfielcl, N. ]. 

Electrical Engineering 

Pi Mu Epsilon, Secretary, 4; 
American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, Secretary, 3, Chair- 
man, 4; Iota Gamma Pi; Delta 
Epsilon Sigma; Engineers' 
Council, 4; Track, I, 2; Dean's 
List. 



Gladys Estelle Souder 

Macon, Ga. 

General 

Delta Delta Delta; Chronicle, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Co-ed Business Man- 
ager, 3; Publications Board, 4; 
Duke Players, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority 
Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary, 4; President's Club, 4. 



Elgar Clyde Soper 

Olney, Md, 

General 

American University, 1, 2; 
Undergraduate Ministerial As- 
sociation; Dean's List. 






Hilda Spence 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

Teaching 

Delta Phi Alpha, Vice Pres- 
ident, 4; Dean's List. 




Edger Robert Stallings 

Augusta, Ga. 
Pre-Legal 

Pi Kappa Phi. 



Oscar Grant Stallings 

Augusta, Ga, 
General 



Somers 
Souder 



Louis A. Steeg, Jr. 

Toledo, Ohio 
General 



Dean's List. 



Phi Kappa Psi; Alpha Kappa Psi; De Pa 
versity, I, 2; Dean's List. 



Eleanor Stevenson 

New Bern, N. C. 
General 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Hollins College, I. 



E. Stallings 



O. Stallings 



Steeg 



St 



evenson 





95 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Theodore L. Stritzinger 

Norristown, Pa. 

Business Administration 

Delta Sigma Phi; Tennis, 4; 
Dean's List. 



George Foster Sutherland 

Grundy, Va. 

General 

Hiwassee Junior College, 1, 
2; Dean's List. 



Elizabeth B. Sutton 

Harnsburg, Pa. 

General 

Phi Mu; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 
4; Polity Club; Womens' Ath- 
letic Association Board, 3, 4; 
Social Standards, 4; Duke Play- 
ers, 3, 4; Senior Executive Com- 
mittee; Class Secretary, 4. 



Ernest C. Swiger 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Pre- Legal 

Kappa Alpha. 



Stritzinger 
Sutton 



Sutherland 
Swiger 



Horace E. Tabb 

Elizabethtown, Ky. 
Pre-Legal 
Sigma Nu; Basketball, 1. 



Margaret Willard Taylor 

Chester, Pa. 

Teaching 

Alpha Phi; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 4; French Salon 
Treasurer, 4; Glee Club, 3, 4, Secretary, 4; Choir, 
3,4. 



Ralph A. Taylor 

Summit, N. J. 

Business Administration 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Tennis, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2; Beta Omega Sigma. 



Harold K. Terry 

Bahama, N. C. 
General 

Sigma Pi Sigma; Pegram Chemistry Club. 



Tabb 



M. Taylor 



R. Taylor 



Terry 




96 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Jeannette Te Selle 

Gainesville, Fla. 
Pre-Legal 
Kappa Delta. 



William Dalzell Trader 

Elmira, N. Y. 
General 

Theta Alpha Phi; Dean's List. 



R. Zack Thomas, Jr. 

Rock Hill, S. C. 

General 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Omicron 
Delta Kappa; Track, 1; Football, 
1; Beta Omega Sigma; Glee 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Red Friars; Musical Clubs, 
President, 4; Class Treasurer, 
2, President, 3; Student Gov- 
ernment President, 4; Vice Pres- 
ident Southeastern Region of 
N. S. F. A., 4. 

Joseph A. Trainor, Jr. 

High Bridge, N. J. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Phi Eta Sigma; American So- 
ciety of Mechanical Engineers, 
2, 3, 4; President, 4; 9019; 
Delta Epsilon Sigma; Iota Gam- 
ma Pi, President, 4; Glee Club, 
2, 3; Southgate Council, 1, 2, 3, 
4, President, 4; Dean's List. 










Te Selle 
Trader 


Katharine E. Trousdale 

Florence, Ala. 






W. James Turpit 

Hastings, Neb. 


Teaching 

Sigma Kappa. 


Alpha 


Tau 


Law 

Omega. 


William W. Turner, Jr. 

Montclair, N. J. 






Martha Van Vactc 

Marion, Ind. 



Thomas 
Trainor 



Mechanical Engineering 

Delta Sigma Phi; Pi Mu Epsilon; Chronicle, 4; 
Manager Swimming, 4; Iota Gamma Pi; Delta Ep- 
silon Sigma; Engineers' Club; American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers; Duke Players; Dean's 
List. 



Business Administration 

Northwestern University, 1. 



Trousdale 



Turner 



Turpit 



Van Vactor 




97 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Jane Vonderlieth 

Glen Rock, N. J. 

Business Administration 



Margaret Ann Waldrep 

Hammond, La. 

General 

Kappa Delta; Delta Psi 
Omega; Whitworth College, 1, 2; 
Class Treasurer, 4; CHANTI- 
CLEER, 3, 4; Publications 
Board, 4; Senior Council; May 
Day Comm.ittee; Dean's List. 



Robert Eugene Walsh 

Elmira, N. Y. 

General 

Symphony Orchestra; Peg- 
ram Chemistry Club. 



Thurnnan L. Ward 

Galax, Va. 

General 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Tombs, 
Vice President, 4; Beta Omega 
Sigma; Track, 1; Football, 1, 2, 
3, 4. 



Vonderlieth 
Walsh 



Waldrep 
Ward 



Charles Ransome Warren 

Chatham, Va. 

Pre-Legal 

Football, 1; Polity Club; Cheer Leader, 2; Col- 
umbia Literary Society. 



Chandler Washer, Jr. 

Maplewood, N. J. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Engineers' Club; American Society of Mechan- 
ical Engineers; Dean's List. 



John Clarence Watson, Jr. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

General 

Pi Kappa Phi; Basketball, 1; Track, 4; Band, 1, 
2, 3; Glee Club, I, 3; Choir, 1, 3. 



Kenneth D. Weagly 

Waynesboro, Pa. 
General 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Warren 



Washer 



Watson 



Weagly 





98 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Harmon M. Webb 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Business Administration 

Pi Kappa Phi; Football, 1, 2. 



John M. Webb 

Durham, N. C. 

Teaching 

Alpha Tau Omega; Track, 
1, 2, 3; Cross-Country, 2, 3; 
Polity Club, President, 4; Com- 
mencement Marshal, 1, 2. 



Richard F. Weil 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
Business Adnninistration 

University of Buffalo, 1, 2. 



Nathan Irving Weinstein 

St. Augustine, Fla. 

Pre-Legal 

Zeta Beta Tau; Delta Phi 
Alpha; Pegram Chemistry Club; 
Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 4; 
Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2; Jun- 
ior Council; Senior Council. 



Walter H. Weintz 

Austinville, Va. 

Honors 

Sigma Upsilon; Antioch College, 1; Chronicle, 
4; Archive, 4; Columbia Literary Society; Dean's 
List. 



Ida Welsh 

Deal, N. J. 
Pre-Legal 

Duke Players; Debating Club. 



Weintz 



Welsh 



Wentz 




Earle Jerry Wentz 

Danville, Va. 

ler 

Omicron Delta Kappa; Tombs; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Beta Omega Sigma; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; All- 
Southern-End, 3, 4; All-American Honorable Men- 
tion; Dean's List. 

Carl R. Wesselhoft 

Bayshore, N. Y. 
Pre-Legal 

Pi Kappa Phi. 



Wesselhoft 




99 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Ethel Weyant 

Cedarhurst, N. Y. 

Pre -Medical 

Adelphi College, 1, 2; Delta 
Phi Rho Alpha, 3, 4, Vice Pres- 
ident, 4. 



Charles Edgar White 

Hertford, N. C. 

Social Service x 

Lambda Chi Alpha; CHANTI- 
CLEER, 3; Track, 1, 2; Columbia 
Literary Society. 



George Edward White, Jr. 

Bradenton, Fla. 

General 

Delta Phi Alpha; Theta Alpha 
Phi; Phi Eta Sigma; Freshman 
Council; Chronicle, 1; Duke 
Players, 2, 3, 4: Dean's List. 



Herbert G. Whiting 

Mountain Lakes, N. J. 

Pre-Legal 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Beta 
Omega Sigma; Chronicle, 1, 2, 
3; Archive, 1, 2; Swimming, 1, 
2, 3, 4; Dean's List. 



Weyant 
G. White 




C. White 
Whiting 

Robert M. Whitley 

Stantonsburg, N. C. 
Pre- Medical 



Dean's List. 



Austin Robert Whitmore 

Toledo, Ohio 

General 

Sophomore "Y" Council; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 
4; Columbia Literary Society; Undergraduate 
Ministerial Association; Dean's List. 



Katherine Janet Whitmyre 

Indiana, Pa. 

Teaching 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Pennsylvania State 
Teachers College, 1, 2; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation Board, 3, 4; Student Council, 4; Freshman 
Adviser, 4; White Duchy; Nereidian Club. 

Fred A. Wildnauer 

East Orange, N. J. 

Business Administration 

Keys Club; Alpha Kappa Psi; Junior Council- 
Archive, 3; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Alpha Kappa 
Psi, President, 4; Track, 1; Glee Club, 3; CHANTI- 
CLEER, 2. 



Whitley 



Whitmore 



Whitmyre 



Wildnauer 




100 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Luther K. Williams 

Durham, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Track, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Beta Omega Sigma. 



Melvin J. Willianns 

Durham, N. C. 

General 

Beta Omega Sigma; Wres- 
tling, 1, 2, 4; Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Football, 1; Undergraduate Min- 
isterial Association; Junior 
Council; Sophomore "Y" Coun- 
cil. 



A. Gray Wilson 

Indiana, Pa. 

Business Administration 

Phi Kappa Sigma; Alpha Kap- 
pa Psi; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Virginia Elizabeth Winfree 

Lynchburg, Va. 

General 

Sigma Kappa; Sorority Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 3, 4, Vice 
President, 4. 




Ernest A. Winton 

Miami Beach, Fla. 

Business Administration 

Keys Club; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Student Director Musical Clubs, 4; Pan-Hellenic 
Council, 3, 4; Swimming, 3, 4. 



H. W. Witcover 

Darlington, S. C. 
Honors 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Dean's List. 



L. Williams 
Wilson 



Ellen Witwer 

Tulsa, Okla. 
General 



M. Williams 
Winfree 



Kappa Kappa Gamma; Phi Theta Kappa; Gulf 
Park College, 1, 2; May Day Committee. 



William Egleston Woodruff 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Pre-Medical 

Phi Delta Theta; Phi Beta Kappa; Co-Editor-in- 
Chief CHANTICLEER, 4, Assistant Editor, 3; Iota 
Gamma Pi; Sophomore Honor Scholarship; Glee 
Club, 2, 3, 4; Choir, 2, 3, 4; Publications Board, 4; 
Dean's List. 



Winton 



Witcover 



Witwer 



Woodruff 





101 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Herbert M. Woolf 

Providence, K'. 1. 

Pre-Legal 

Chronicle, 1; Archive, 1; Soc- 
cer, 3, 4; Tennis, 1; Dean's List. 



Madge Woolsey 

Glen Rock, N. J. 

General 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Glee Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Choir, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



A. Lyman Wright, Jr. 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Business Administration 

Delta Tau Delta; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; Freshman Council; Sopho- 
more "Y" Council; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet, 3; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, 
4, Assistant Advertising Man- 
ager, 3, Office Manager, 4. 



Fred C. Wright, Jr. 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Business Administration 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis, 3, 4. 



Woolf 

A. Wright 




Woolsey 
F. Wright 



J. Malcolm Wright 

Westfield, N. J. 
General 



Football, 1; Baseball, 1; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Freshman Council; Sophomore "Y" Council. 



William B. Wright, Jr. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

General 

Alpha; Kappa Kappa Psi; Sigma Upsilon; 
4; Symphony Orchestra, 4; Chronicle, 



William Norman Yelverton 

Eureka, N. C. 
Business Administration 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Dean's List. 



Esther Zuckerman 

Durham, N. C. 
Teaching 

Town Girls' Club; Dean's List. 



J. Wright 



W. Wright 



Yelverton 



Zuckerman 




102 




SENIOR NURSES 



THE 



CHANTICLEER 




SENIOR NURSES 



Evelyn M. Cadle 
Augusta, Ga. 

Ona M. Gates 
Mebane, N. G. 

Mary Elizabeth Gorbett 
Kinston, N. G. 

Ruth Elizabeth Gambill 
Peoria, 111. 



Cadle 
Gorbett 



Gates 
Gambill 



Frances Randolph Hunter 
Marlinton, Va. 



Mary Alice McGain 
McGormick, S. C. 



Hunter 



King 



Mary Emily King 
Magnolia, N. G. 



McGain 





104 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



SENIOR NURSES 



Margaret Carolyn Moore 
Norfolk, Va. 

Sarah Elizabeth Strother 
Waxhaw, N. C. 

Elizabeth May Thompson 
Durham, N. C. 

Alice Rosabelle Wehunt 
Cherryville, N. C. 




Mary Cornelia Williams 
Greensboro, N. C. 



105 



DUKE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Duke University School of Nursing was estabUshed in nineteen twenty- 
five in connection with the School of Medicine of the University. The first 
class was enrolled in nineteen-thirty. 

The plan of the School is to give a sound basis course in Nursing Education 
which will prepare young women to give intelligent nursing care to the sick in 
hospitals and homes of the community, as well as an introduction to the problems 
of community health and preventive medicine. Two courses are offered: the 
Three-Year Basic Course leading to a diploma in nursing, and the Five-Year 
Course granting a degree of Bachelor of Science in nursing. 

There has been a steady growth in the enrollment of the School, and each 
year shows a wider distribution of states represented. The students who have 
graduated have either gone on to further study, or entered some of the various 
fields of nursing, such as Institutional, Private Duty, or Public Health Nursing. 

Since nineteen-thirty the Diploma in Nursing has been conferred upon fifty- 
five persons. Sixteen will graduate this year. 




JUNIORS 




Juniors 



D. Adams 
Alexander 
Appleford 



R. B. Adams 

Althoff 

Ardolino 



R. Adams 

Ambler 

G. Armstrong 



W. R. Adams 

Anderson 

M. Armstrong 



Akin 

Andrews 

Arnold 



Alberts 
Andrus 
Ashby 



Dorothy Adams 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Randal B. Adams 
Washington, D. C. 
Chronicle 1. 

Ruth Adams 

Esterly, Pa. 
Pi Mu Epsilon; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 

Willis R. Adams 
Clarkesville, Va. 



Elizabeth Akin 

Detroit, Mich. 
Delta Delta Delta; Freshman Adviser 
3; Duke Players 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3; 
Chronicle, Co-ed Business Man- 
ager 3. 

Jack Alberts 

HoLokon, N. J. 
American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers. 



Wendell W. Alexander 

Villanova, Pa. 
Pi Mu Epsilon; American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers; Engineers' 
Club. 

C. Clair Althoff 

Hanover, Pa. 
Delta Phi Alpha; Swimming 1, 2. 

Wayne H. Ambler 

Abington, Pa. 
Kappa Sigma; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Soccer 
3; Tombs; Athletic Council 3. 

Marie Anderson 

Jacksonville Fla. 

Delta Delta Delta; Chronicle 1, 3; 
Duke Players 2, 3, Co-ed Business 
Manager 3; Dean's List. 

Vernon Liles Andrews 

Mount Giledil, N. C. 



Bettie Andrus 

Columbus, Ohio 




George B. Appleford 

North Andover, Mass 
Delta Tau Delta; Pegram Chemistry 
Club. 

John C. Ardolino 

Metuchen, N. J. 
Sigma Chi; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Tombs; Wrestling 1, 2, 3, Captain 3. 

Gary Armstrong 

Selma Ala. 
Kappa Delta; Distaff 1; Social Stand- 
ards Committee; CHANTICLEER 2; 
Dean's List. 

Mary Engle Armstrong 

Binghamton, N. Y. 
Kappa Delta; Randolph-Macon Wo- 
mans College 1; Freshman Adviser 3. 

Lee Arnold 

Chicaqo, 111. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon; Beta 
Omega Sigma; Football 1, 2; Honors 
in Mathematics; Dean's List. 

Henry Nicholson Ashby 

Durhdin, N. C. 
Alpha Tau Omega; Tennis 1, 2, 3; 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Archive 1. 



108 



Juniors 





E. D. Atkins 

Bailey 

Barber 



J. M. Atkins 
C. H. Baker 
Barnes 



Atkinson 
W. R. Baker 
P. Bassett 



Auld 

J. P. Baldwin 

E. R. Bassett 



Austin 

R. L. Baldwin 

Bateman 



Baeder 
Ballard 
Bean 



Emmet D. Atkins, Jr. 

Gastonia, N. C. 
Alpha Lambda Tau; Kappa Kappa 
Psi; Georgia Tech. 1; Band 2; Sym- 
phony Orchestra 2; Chronicle 2. 

James M. Atkins 

Asheville, N. C. 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Cheer Leader 1, 2, 3. 

John V. Atkinson 

Pueblo, Col. 
Sigma Pi Sigma; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Pegram Chemistry Club; Band 1, 2, 
3; Symphony Orchestra 1, 3; Dean's 
List. 

Mary E. Auld 
Charleston, W. Va. 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Student Govern- 
ment 3. 

Richard E. Austin 

Delmar, N. Y. 

Delta Tau Delta; Phi Eta Sigma; Alpha 

Kappa Psi; Sophomore "Y" Council; 

CHANTICLEER 1, 2, 3. 

Fred N. Baeder 

Nutley, N. J. 
Delta Phi Alpha; Sophomore Honors; 
9019; Dean's List. 



George Robert Bailey 

Rockville Centre, N. Y. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Swimming 2, 3; Dean's 
List. 

Charles H. Baker 

South Orange, N. J. 
Phi Kappa Psi; American Society of 
Civil Engineers; Engineers' Club. 

William Russell Baker 

Bronxville, N. Y. 
Band 1, 2, 3; Symphony Orchestra 
1, 2, 3. 

John Paul Baldwin 

Rochester, Pa. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Geneva College 1, 2. 

R. L. Baldwin, Jr. 

Durham, N. C. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Football 1, 2, 3. 

Chadwick Carroll Ballard 

Exmore, Va. 
Delta Tau Delta; Columbia Literary 
Society. 



Horace Barber 

Glens Falls, N. Y. 
Phi Delta Theta; Basketball 1; Fresh- 
man Council; Soccer 2, 3. 

John I. Barnes, Jr. 

Clayton, N. C. 

Paula Bassett 

New York, N. Y. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Music Study 
Club; Student Government 3; Glee 
Club; Sandals; Dean's List. 

Edgar Rees Bassett 

Scarsdale, N. Y. 



Oliver Jerome Bateman, Jr. 

Byron, Ga. 
Delta Phi Alpha; Pegram Chemistry 
Club; Dean's List. 



Robert T. Bean 

Louisville, Ky. 
Alpha Tau Omega; Archive 1, 2, 3. 



109 




Juniors 



Beard 


Beazley 


Beck 


Beich 


Bennett 


Birminghann 


Bistline 


Bode 


Boeker 


Books 


Bowen 


Boyce 


A. L. Boyd 


J. C. Boyd 


Boyle 


Boylston 


Brinn 


Broughton 



Francis Dean Beard 

Durham, N. C. 
Assistant Football Manager 1, 2, 3; 
Tennis 1, 3. 

Richard L. Beazley 

South Orange, N. ]. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Junior Council; Amer- 
ican Society of Civil Engineers; 
Dean's List. 

Willard Sperring Beck 
Beverly, N. ]. 
Sigma Chi. 

Paul M. Beich 

Bloommgton, 111. 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Tennis 1, 2, 3. 

Albert Edward Bennett 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Delta Phi Alpha, 
Treasurer; Archive. 

Willianx G. Birmingham 

Liberty, NY, 
Delta Tau Delta. 



James Adams Bistline 

Cumberland, Md. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Kappa Kappa Psi; 
Freshman Honors; Sophomore Hon- 
ors; Band 2, 3; Columbia Literary 
Society, President, 3; 9019; Freshman 
"Y" Council; Sophomore "Y" Coun- 
cil; Y. M. C. A. Treasurer 3; Dean's 
List. 

Helmuth H. Bode 
Wochawken, N. J. 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Delta Phi Alpha, 
Treasurer 2, President 3; American 
Society of Civil Engineers; Heidel- 
berg University 2; Football 1. 
Robert Otto Boeker 
Seymour, Conn. 
Phi Delta Theta; Beta Omega Sigma; 
CHANTICLEER 1, 2; Chronicle 3; 
Duke Players 1, 2; Junior Pan-Hellenic 
Council. 

J. Wesley Books 
Haddon Heights, N. ]. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Columbia Literary 
Society; Chronicle I; Archive 1. 
Walton Bowen 
Mdcon, Cid. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Y. W. C. A. Vice 
President; Women's Shident Govern- 
ment; Sandals. 

Stanley F. Boyce 
Baltimore, Md. 
American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers, Treasurer; Engineers' Club. 




Anna L. Boyd 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Pi Beta Phi; Nereidian Club, Vice 
President; Social Standards Com- 
mittee; Dean's List. 

James C. Boyd 

Huntington, W. Va. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Football 1, 2, 3. 

Kenneth MacDonald Boyle 

Arlington, N. J. 
Delta Sigma Phi; Pi Mu Epsilon; Soc- 
cer Manager 3; Glee Club 1. 

B. F. Boylston 

Aiken, S. C. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Sara Brinn 

Hertford, N. C. 

Kay Broughton 

Hertford, N. C 
St. Mary's Junior College 1, 2. 

110 



Juniors 





E. W. Brown 


J. F. Brown 


J. W. Brown 


Brundage 


Bruner 


Buck 


Burger 


Burgess 


Burke 


Burrell 


Burwell 


Bussell 


Bynum 


Byrn 


Callahan 


Garden 


Carrigan 


Chambliss 



Edwin Wells Brown 

Asheville, N. C. 

Jean Fontaine Brown 

Fort Benning, Ga. 
Sigma Kappa; George Washington 
University 1. 

James Walter Brown, Jr. 

Gatesville N. C. 
Beta Omega Sigma; 9019; Pegram 
Chemistry Club; Freshman Honors; 
Sophomore Honors; Track 1; Phi Eta 
Sigma; Dean's List. 

Jesse Powell Brundage 

Chester, Pa. 
Kappa Sigma; Chronicle 2. 

Jerome Bruner 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Chronicle 1; Track 1; Dean's List. 

Robert E. Buck 

Fort Washington, Pa. 
Pi Mu Epsilon; American Society of 
Civil Engineers. 



Josephine Terry Burger 

Baltimore, Md. 
Kappa Delta; Delta Phi Rho Alpha; 
Women's Athletic Association Board 
1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Freshman 
Adviser 3; Social Standards Com- 
mittee 3; Distaff 1; Choir 1. 

Woodrow Burgess 

Royal Oak, Mich. 
Delta Tau Delta. 

Joe F. Burke 

Detroit, Mich. 
University of Detroit 1; Duke Ambas- 
sadors Orchestra Leader. 

Clayton J. Burrell 

Manistique, Mich. 
Delta Tau Delta; Northwestern Uni- 
versity 1, 2; Dean's List. 

George Allen Burwell 

Warrenton, N. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi; Glee Club 1, 2; Assist- 
ant Manager Swimming 1, 2; Manager 

Swimming 3; Dean's List. 

Wilsie Florence Bussell 

Durham, N. C. 
Freshman Honors; Sophomore Hon- 
ors; Chronicle 1; Town Girls' Club; 
French Club; Dean's List. 



Eva Page Bynum 

Rockingham, N. C. 
Delta Delta Delta; Randolph-Macon 
Woman's College 1, 2. 

Mary Lalla Byrn 

Mayfield, Ky 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Ward-Bel- 
mont 1, 2; Woman's College Orch- 
estra 3; Social Standards Committee; 
Dean's List. 

Peter E. Callahan 

New York, N. Y. 
Kappa Sigma; Rutgers University 1. 

Campbell Carden 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Margaret H. Carrigan 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Sizer Chambliss 

Lookout Mt., Tenn. 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3. 



Ill 




Juniors 



Cheek 


Childs 


Clark 


Clarke 


Clay 


S. Clay 


Clayton 


Cleaveland 


Cline 


Cobb 


C. Collins 


H. R. Collins 


Condit 


Cone 


Connell 


Coppedge 


W. A. Corbett 


W. H. Corbett 



Herbert Nash Cheek 

Durham, N. C. 
Sigma Chi; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3; 
Tombs. 

Frances Childs 

Durham, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Forum Club, 
Vice President 3; Town Girls' Club; 
Dean's List. 

Fred Clark 

Maplewood, N. J. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Beta Omega Sig- 
ma; Symphony Orchestra 1, 2, 3; 
Glee Club 1, 2; Tennis Manager 3. 

Claire Belle Clarke 

New York, N. Y. 
Phi Mu Sorority; Pan-Hellenic 
Council. 

Arthur Thomas Clay 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Stafford Clay 

beckley, W. Va. 
Pegram Chemistry Club; Glee Club 
2, 3; Dean's List. 



Edgar Lawrrence Clayton 

Bayside, N. Y. 
Kappa Kappa Psi; Band 1, 2, 3; Sym- 
phony Orchestra 1, 2. 

Fred N. Cleaveland 

Orange, N. J. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Beta Omega Sigma; 9019; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet 3; Duke Players; Dean's List. 

Gwen Cline 

Charlotte, N, C. 
Kappa Delta; Sandals; Class Treas- 
urer 2; Women's Athletic Association 
Board 2, 3; Nereidian Club, Secretary 
2, 3; Chronicle 3; Dean's List; Delta 
Phi Rho Alpha. 

Charles D. Cobb 

Greenville, N. C. 

Curtis Collins 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Phi Delta Theta. 

Harold Reeves Collins 

South Seaviiie, N. I. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Dean's List; 9019. 




A. Nelson Condit 

East Orange, N. J. 
Glee Club 1, 2; Choir 1, 2. 



Arthur Read Cone, Jr. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
Delta Tau Delta; Track 1; CHANTI- 
CLEER 1, 2, 3. 



Margaret Nowell Connell 

Charleston, W. Va. 



Eleanor Browne Coppedge 

Cleveldiul Heights, Ohio 
Kappa Delta; Southwestern College 
1, 2. 



Waddell Albert Corbett 

Wilmington, N. C. 



William Horace Corbett 

Wilmington, N. C. 



112 



Juniors 





Cornett 

Cox 

Daniels 



Cornish 

Craven 

Dator 



Corriher 

Crum. 

David 



Cosgrove 

Culbertson 

Davis 



Cottinghann. 
Cumnnings 
Donna Day 



Cowan 
Curtis 
Doris Day 



B. H. Cornett 

Bluefield, W. Va. 
Sigma Nu. 

Donald Cornish 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 
American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers. 

W. Douglas Corriher 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Sophomore "Y" Coun- 
cil, President; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
3; Columbia Literary Society; Minis- 
terial Fellowship, Secretary 3; Dean's 
List. 

Walter A. Cosgrove 
Southampton, N. Y. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Junior Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council. 

Tom Cottingham 

Douglas, Ga. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Freshman Council, 
President; Glee Club; Choir; Soph- 
omore "Y" Council; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet 3. 

Robert L. Cowan 

Newport, Tenn 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



H. Morris Cox 

Mount Olive, N. C. 
Dean's List. 

Isobel Craven 

Lexington, N. C. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Glee Club 1, 
2; Choir 1; Archive 1; Dean's List. 

Emilie Crum 

Orangeburg, S. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Junior Big Sisters, 
Treasurer; Sandals; May Day Com- 
mittee 2. 

Martha Jane Culbertson 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Kappa Delta; Sandals; Student Coun- 
cil 3; Dean's List. 

Robert W. Cummings 

Lynbrook, N. Y. 
Pi Mu Epsilon, Treasurer 3; American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

Paul Makepeace Curtis 

Greensboro, N. C. 
Freshman Council; Sophomore "Y" 
Council; Columbia Literary Society. 



Robert P. Daniels 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Assistant Manager Baseball 1, 2. 

Frank Dator 

Mahwah, N. J. 
Football 1, 2; Track 1, 2, 3; Cross- 
country 2, 3; Freshman Council; 
Columbia Literary Society; Sopho- 
more "Y" Council. 

J. K. David, Jr. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Dean's List. 

George D. Davis 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Glee Club; 
Choir. 

Donna Day 

Bradenton, Fla. 
Delta Delta Delta; Chronicle 1. 

Doris Day 

Bradenton, Fla. 
Delta Delta Delta. 



113 




Juniors 



Deneen 


Desvernine 


Duckett 


Duehring 


V. Duehring 


Eastwood 


Edwards 


M. Edwards 


Marg. Edwards 


Etter 


Faires 


Farmer 


Farrar 


Fennell 


Ferris 


Findlay 


Fisher 


W. H. Fisher 



Russell Sanders Deneen 

BdkersviUe, N. C. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Sophomore Honors; 
9019; Dean's List. 

Eugene Desvernine 

Marianao, Havana, Cuba 
Pi Kappa Phi; Phi Eta Sigma; 9019; 
Dean's List. 

Sara Duckett 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Alpha Phi; Delta Phi Alpha; Pegram 
Chemistry Club; Woman's College 
Orchestra; Music Study Club; Dean's 
List. 

Frederica Elizabeth Duehring 

Wcisliington, D. C. 
Alpha Phi; Wilson Teachers' College 
1, 2; Dean's List. 

Virginia Atwell Duehring 

Washington, D. C. 

Alpha Phi; Wilson Teachers' College 
1, 2; Df^an's List. 

Howard Eastwood, Jr. 

Burlington, N. J. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Glee Club 1, 2; Assist- 
ant Track Manager 1, 2, 3; Class 
Secretary 3. 



Frances Edwards 

Miami, Fla. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Mary Baldwin 
College 1. 

Malcolm Edwards 

Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Delta Epsilon Sigma; American Soci- 
ety of Mechanical Engineers, Vice 
President 3; Wrestling 1; Southgate 
Council 2, 3, 4; (Omitted from Senior 
Section by Mistake). 

Margery Edwards 

Greensboro, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Archive 1, 2; CHAN- 
TICLEER 1, 2; Freshman Adviser 3. 

Harry Etter 

Shippensburg, Pa. 
Phi Delta Theta; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Chronicle, Issue Editor 3; Track 1. 

Betty Faires 

Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Student Council 

1, 3; Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council 

2, 3; Sandals; Doan's List. 

Willis G. Farmer 

Bailey, N. C. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Track 1. 




William Baker Farrar, Jr. 

Sumrnerville, Ga. 

Kappa Alpha; Pegram Chemistry 
Club. 

George Fennell 

Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
Duke Players. 

Douglas Willson Ferris 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; Chron- 
icle 1; Cross-Country 1, 2, 3; Track 
1, 2, 3. 

Betty Findlay 

Bethlehem, Pa. 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3. 

John L. Fisher 

Lakewood, Ohio 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Beta Omega Sigma; Glee Club; Pe- 
gram Chemistry Club. 

William Henry Fisher, Jr. 

Centreville, Md. 



114 



Juniors 





Flanagan 

Frantz 

Gantt 



R. Flanagan 

Fraser 

Garnion 



Fletcher 

Friedlander 

Gates 



Flowers Folsom 

Fryer Fuller 

George Gibbons 



Fox 

Fulmer 
Gibson 



Harriet Flanagan 

Rockville Centre, N. Y. 
Phi Mu; Adelphi College 1, 2; Dean's 
List. 



Ruby Flanagan 

Lynchburg, Va. 



Phi Mu. 



Albert W. Fletcher 

Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Track 1, 2; Soccer 
2, 3; Wrestling 2; Band 1; Glee Club 
1; Choir 1. 

Harold Flowers 

Hickory, N. C. 

Kenneth P. Folsom 

Washington, D. C. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Assistant Box- 
ing Manager 1, 3. 

L. Palmer Fox 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Archive 1; Base- 
ball Manager 1. 



Ivan D. Frantz 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Sigma Pi Sigma; Delta 
Phi Alpha; Iota Gamma Pi; Pegram 
Chemistry Club; Freshman Council; 
Sophomore "Y" Council; Band 1, 2, 
3; Symphony Orchestra; 9019; Dean's 
List. 

Hortense Fraser 
Elizabeth, N. J. 
Delta Delta Delta; New Jersey College 
for Women 1, 2. 

Irwin Friedlander 

Moultrie, Ga. 
Zeta Beta Tau; Phi Eta Sigma; 9019; 
Wrestling 2; Debahng Club 3; Dean's 
List. 

John C. Fryer 

Richmond, Va. 
Stephen Fuller 

Chevy Chase, Md. 
Kappa Sigma; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Foot- 
ball 1. 

William Henry Fulnner 

Savannah, Ga. 
Pi Kappa Phi; Basketball 1; CHANTI- 
CLEER 1, 2, 3; Pegram Chemistry 
Club. 



Hazel Ann Gantt 

Durham, N. C. 
Dean's List. 

Esther Garmon 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Alpha Gamma Delta; Queens-Chi- 
cora College 1, 2. 

Margina Gates 

Macon, Ga. 
Alpha Delta Pi. 

Judson George 

Laurens, S. C. 
Track 1, 2, 3; Cross-Country 2, 3, 
Captain 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Choir 
1, 2, 3; Tombs. 

Julius J. Gibbons, Jr. 

Wilson, N. C. 
Kappa Sigma. 

Gordon M. Gibson 

Chatham, N. J. 
Chronicle 3. 



115 




Ju 



n 1 o r s 



Gilbert Gill Gillander Gillespie Gillies Gilpin 

Goddard Goldstein Goodson Gorringe Gostin Gourley 

Graeter Green Gregory Griffith Guerin F. L. Guerin 



Earl S. Gilbert 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Charles H. Gill 

Newport, R. I. 
Kappa Alpha; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Pan- 
Hellenic Council 3; Publications 
Board 3; Tombs; Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Robert C. Gillander 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sigma Chi; Football 1; Pan-Hellenic 
Council. 

J. Stuart Gillespie 

Stamford, Conn. 
Archive 2, 3; Chronicle 2; Duke 
Players 1. 

Willard Merrill Gillies 

Melrose, Mosz. 
Delta Sigma Phi; Chronicle 1, 2, 3. 

Richard B. Gilpin 

Maplewood, N. J. 
Sigma Nu; Class Secretary 1; Track 
1, 2, 3; Football 1. 



Marjorie Goddard 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Phi Mu. 

Samuel Goldstein 

Salem, N. J. 
Duke Players. 

Georgia Goodson 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; St. Mary's Junior 
College 1, 2. 

James N. Gorringe 

East Orange, N. J. 
Delta Sigma Phi; Head Cheer 
Leader 3. 

Seymour Bernard Gostin 

White Plains, N. Y. 
Freshman Council; Sophomore "Y" 
Council. 

Robert D. Gourley 

New York, N. Y. 




Annadale Graeter 

Richmond, Va. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Duke Players 1, 2, 3; 
CHANTICLEER 1, 2, 3; Archive 1, 2, 
3, Business Manager 3; Glee Club 1. 

W. Thornton Green 

Louisville, Ky. 
Alpha Tau Omega; Chronicle 2, 3; 
Pan-Hellenic Council. 

Rolfe Gregory 

Petersburg, Va. 
American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers; Engineers' Club. 

Erma Griffith 

Lebanon, Va. 
Debating 2; Debaters' Council, Vice 
President 3. 

B. Bowman Guerin 

Mendham, N. J. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Choir 1, 2, 3; American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers; Fre s h in a n 
Honors; Football 1; Freshman Coun- 
cil. 

Frederick L. Guerin 

South Orange, N. j. 



116 






Juniors 





Gwin 

Hanes 

Hawkins 



Haas 

P. H. Hanes 

Heddesheinn.er 



Haines 

Hardy 

Henson 



Hall 

Harris 

Hermann 



Hallock 

R. K. Harris 

Herrick 



Ham 

Harrison 

Hessick 



Anne Gwin 

Natchez, Miss. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Dean's List. 

Richard G. Haas 

Youngstown, Ohio 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 

R. Frith Haines 

Bayamo, Cuba 
Wrestling, 1, 2, 3. 

Robert F. Hall 

Charleston, W. Va. 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Football 1, 2; Junior 
Pan-Hellenic Council. 

Charles Benjamin Hallock 

Elmira, N. Y. 
Phi Delta Theta; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Chronicle 2, 3; Assistant Basketball 
Manager 1. 



Newton Henderson Hanes 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

P. Huber Hanes, Jr. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Alpha Tau Omega; Beta Omega Sig- 
ma; Track 1, 2, 3; Football 1; Baseball 
1; CHANTICLEER 1. 

Johnnie Mae Hardy 

Gulfport, Miss. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Gulf Park 
College 1, 2. 

Mary Trapp Harris 

Cuthbert, Ga. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Andrew College 1, 
2; Archive 3. 

R. Kennedy Harris 

Newport, Ark. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Carter Hawkins 

Asheviile, N. C. 
Mars Hill College 1, 2; Dean's List. 

George H. Heddesheimer 

Yonkers, N. Y. 
Columbia University 1; Chronicle 2. 

Frances Henson 

Rahway, N. I. 
Delta Delta Delta; Maryville College 
1, 2; Glee Club; Orchestra. 

Gayle Louis Hermann 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Albert Louis Herrick 

Lebanon, Ohio 
Sigma Chi; Freshman Council 
Chronicle 1, 2; Beta Omega Sigma: 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Tombs. 



Alan W. Ham, Jr. 

Milton, Mass. 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Charles L. Harrison, Jr. 

Cape Girardeau, Mo. 
Chronicle 1. 



Lucile Hessick 

Washington, D. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Chronicle; Archive. 



117 




Juniors 



Hinnant 


Hintermeister 


Hoffman 


Holt 


Hooks 


Horneffer 


Howard 


Hoyle 


Hughey 


Hunt 


Ibbeken 


Jackson 


Jacobs 


Jantzen 


Jenkinson 



Hinck 

Hooten 

Hunter 



Robert H. Hinck 

Short Hills, N. J. 
Kappa Sigma; Soccer. 

William. W. Hinnant, Jr. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Richard Fredrick Hintermeister 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Delta Tau Delta; Dean's List. 



Johnny Hoffman 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Sigma Chi; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Golf 1; 
Chronicle; Beta Omega Sigma. 

Cicero T. Holt, Jr. 

Burlington, N. C. 



Edward H. Hooks 

Ayden, N. C. 
Football 1, 2, 3; Chronicle 1; Beta 
Omega Sigma. 



Charles Edwards Hooten 

Bloomfield, N. J. 
Keys Club; Swimming 1; Glee Club 
1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3. 

Grant Horneffer 

Westfield, N. J. 
Kappa Sigma; Beta Omega Sigma. 

Robert Glen Howard 

Washington, D. C. 
Sigma Nu; Sigma Upsilon; Delta Phi 
Alpha; Cross-Country 1; Track 1; 
Dean's List. 

Alton Raid Hoyle 

Asheville, N. C. 
Freshman Council; Sophomore "Y" 
Council. 

Mattilee Hughey 

Statesville, N. C. 
Mitchell College 1, 2. 

Betty Hunt 

Germantown, Pa. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 




Robert Gray Hunter 

Lansdowne, Pa. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Alpha Kappa Psi 
Assistant Manager Baseball 1, 2, 3 
Trident Club 2; Duke Players 2, 3 
Archive 2; Freshman Council; Soph- 
omore "Y" Council. 

Gunther Henry Ibbeken 
Haddon Heights, N. J. 
Siqma Chi; Bucknell 1; Baseball 2, 3. 
Frederick R. Jackson, Jr. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon; Beta 
Omega Sigma; American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers; 9019; Iota Gam- 
ma Pi; Dean's List. 

Albert Gentel Jacobs 
Germantown, Pa. 
Phi Delta Theta; Assistant Cross- 
Country Manager 2, 3; Assistant 
Track Manager 3. 

Nelson R. Jantzen 
Philadelphia, Pd. 
Pi Kappa Phi; Freshman Council- 
Chronicle 1, 2; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Cheer Leader 1-3; Class Treasurer 3. 
Richard D. Jenkinson, Jr. 
Bellevue, Pa. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Junior Pan-Hellenic Council; Junior 
Council; Assistant Basketball Man- 
ager 1, 2, 3; CHANTICLEER 1, 2, 3; 
Sophomore "Y" Council; Dean's List. 

118 



Juniors 





Jennings 
J. L. Jones 
Ketchann 



Johnson 
R. L. Jones 
Ketchun\ 



R. R. Johnson 

Justin 

Kiker 



Johnston 

Kay 

Kincheloe 



Johntz 
R. E. Kay 
King 



Jones 

Kellogg 
Kirkpatrick 



William Chan\pe Jennings 

Westfield, N. J. 
Alpha Tau Omega; CHANTICLEER 
1, 2, 3; Freshman House President; 
Freshman Council; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Class Treasurer 2; Pegram Chemistry 
Club. 

Claude W. Johnson 

Fort Thomas, Ky. 

Roy R. Johnson, Jr. 

Upton, Mass. 
Phi Delta Theta; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Chronicle 1, 2, 3, Issue Editor 3. 

Betty Anne Johnston 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Kappa Delta; Glee Club 1; Choir 1; 
CHANTICLEER 2; Dean's List. 

Frederick F. Johntz 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Delta Tau Delta; Chronicle 3. 

Arthur S. Jones 

Metuchen, N. I. 
Beta Theta Pi; Pi Mu Epsilon. 



Kappa 
List. 



Jane Lee Jones 

Belleville, 111. 
Delta; Duke Players; Dean's 



Robert Lyon Jones 

Murfreesboro, Tenn. 
Kappa Alpha. 

Walter Justin 

Scranton, Pa. 

Louis Kay 

Watseka, 111. 
Beta Omega Sigma; Football 1, 2; 
Chronicle 1, 3. 

Robert Eynon Kay 

Wildwood, N. J. 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Glee Club 1, 
2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer 3; Choir 
1, 2, 3; Sophomore "Y" Council; 
Columbia Literary Society 1, 2, 3, 
Vice President 3; Y. M. C. A. Vice 
President 3; Dean's List. 

Mitchell Kellogg 

New Canaan, Conn. 
V^^restling 1, 2, 3. 



Fredrick Ketcham 

FishkiU, N. Y. 
Freshman House President; Glee 
Club 2, 3; Choir 2, 3; House_ of 
Representatives 2; Sophomore "Y" 
Council; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Soph- 
omore Council; Junior Council. 

Paul F. Ketchum 

Washington, D. C. 
Sigma Nu; Phi Eta Sigma; Freshman 
Council; Sophomore "Y" Council; 
Chronicle 2; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 
Secretary 3. 

Marion Kiker 
Reidsville, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Queens Chicora 
College 1. 

Mary Lou Kincheloe 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Alpha Phi; Y. W. C. A. Secretary 3; 
Glee Club 2, 3; Choir 2, 3; Student 
Volunteers 2, 3; Dean's List. 

John Cheves King, Jr. 

Charleston, W. Va. 
Pi Kappa Phi; Golf 1, 2; Junior Pan- 
Hellenic Council. 

Catherine Kirkpatrick 

Salisbury, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Glee Club 3; 
Dean's List. 



119 




Klock 

Kritzer 

Laing 



Kneipp 

Krizek 

Laird 



Koehler 

Kueffner 

Lambeth 



Koonce 

Kuhn 

Larzelere 



John Douglas Klock 

Walker, N. Y. 
Sigma Chi; Beta Omega Sigma; Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2 
3; Assistant Manager of Wrestling 3 
Musical Clubs 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1 
Track 2. 

John A. Kneipp 

Washington, D. C. 
Kappa Sigma; Sophomore Council; 
Boxing 1, 2, 3, Southern Conference 
Champion 3; Track 2, 3; Tombs; 
Junior Pan-Hellenic Council; Chron- 
icle 1; Class Vice President 3. 

Grace George Koehler 

Fort Hamilton, N. Y. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

John E. Koonce, Jr. 

Chadbourn, N. C. 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3; 
Band 1, 2, 3. 

Kenneth C. Korstian 

Durham, N. c. 

Isobelle Krampf 

Drexel Hill, Fa. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



Morton Daniel Kritzer 

New York, N. Y. 
Delta Phi Alpha; Duke Players 1; 
Dean's List. 

William L. Krizek 

Schenectady, N. Y. 
Union College 1; Track 2, 3. 

Charlotte Kueffner 

Durham, N. C. 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Town Girls' Club. 

Harold H. Kuhn 

Charleston, W. Va. 
Delta Tau Delta; Pegram Chemistry 
Club. 

Harold K. Kurtz 

Lebanon, Pa. 
Swimming 2, 3; Tombs. 

Archer E. Lackey 

Christiansburg, Va. 
Kappa Alpha; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Dean's List. 



Bess Laing 

Charleston, W. Va. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Music Study 
Club; Class President 3. 

Knight Laird 

Jonesboro, Ark. 
Alpha Tau Omega; Kappa Beta Phi; 
Washington and Lee 1, 2; American 
Society of Civil Engineers. 

James E. Lambeth, Jr. 

Thomasville, N. C. 
Phi Delta Theta; Freshman Council; 
CHANTICLEER 1, 2, 3; Beta Omega 
Sigma; Columbia Literary Society; 
Band 1, 2; Golf Manager 3. 

Helen Claire Larzelere 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Pi Beta Phi: Chronicle 3; Dean's List. 

Joseph V. Leidy 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pi Kappa Phi; Track 1, 2, 3; Beta 
Omega Sigma. 

Emeline K. Leinbach 

Wdtsontown, Pa. 
Bucknell University 1; Glee Club 2, 
3; Choir 2, 3; Pegram Chemistry 
Club. 



120 



Juniors 





ESS 




Leland Lengler Lentz 

Lindsay Lins Litaker 

McCallum McCowan McElwrath 



Lewis 

Littell 

McFadyen 



Liana 

Litterst 
McGraw 



Liller 

MacNutt 

Mclntyre 



Roderic S. Leland 

New Canaan, Conn. 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Chronicle 1, 2, 
3; Assistant Baseball Manager 1, 2, 3; 
Dean's List. 

Robert Edward Lengler 

Scranton, Pa. 
Freshman Council; Sophomore "Y" 
Council; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 3; 
Band 1, 2, 3; Dean's List. 

Beth Lentz 

Albemarle, N. C. 
Kappa Delta; Sorority Pan-Hellenic 
Council; Chronicle 2, 3. 

William F. Lewis 

Providence, R. L 



Frank Liana 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Football 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3; 
Tombs; Boxing 1. 

Melvyn Henry Liller 

Hershey, Pa. 



Frances Gordon Lindsay 

High Point, N. C. 
Chronicle 2, 3. 

Harriet Jane Lins 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 
Alpha Epsilon Phi; Sorority Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council 3; Social Standards 

Committee. 

Roy Litaker 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Phi Gamma Delta. 

Ernestine Littell 

Cooperstown, N. Y. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

Harry Bertrand Litterst 

Arlington, N. J. 
Delta Sigma Phi; Junior Pan-Hellenic 
Council 3; Dean's List. 

Doris MacNutt 

Ridgefield Park, N. J. 
Phi Mu; Sandals; Delta Phi Rho Alpha. 



Russell Paul McCallum 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
Sigma Chi. 



Jean McCowan 

New York, N. Y. 



Phi Mu. 



Brooks McElwrath 

Mayheid, Ky. 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 



Oscar L. McFadyen 

Fayetteville, N. C. 
Kappa Sigma. 



Ralph William McGraw 

Johnstown, Pa. 



Evelyn Mclntyre 

New York, N. Y. 



Phi Mu. 



121 




Juniors 



McKee 

Maryott 

Meyer 



McMaster 

Marshall 

Meyerson 



McWreath 

Martin 

Michler 



Mackie 

Matulewicz 

Miller 



Maher 
Mayes 
E. S. L. Miller 



Maier 
Menaker 
J. M. Miller 



Sterling E. McKee 

Bessemer, Pa. 
American Society of Mechanical 
gineers; Band, 1, 2. 



En- 



Gerald Thomas McMaster 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Beta Omega Sigma; Baseball 1, 2, 3. 

Harry C. McWreath 

Wdshiiinton, Pa. 

Joseph Richard Mackie 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Delta Tau Delta; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3; 
Sophomore Council; Junior Council; 
Football 1. 

John J. Maher 

Washington, D. C. 
Delta Tau Delta; Track 1; Chronicle 
2; Trident Club. 

George Maier, Jr. 

Bridgeton, N. J. 
Phi Kappa Sigma. 



Arthur A. Maryott 

Augusta, Ga. 

Junior College of Augusta 1, 2; Dean's 
List. 

Charlotte Marshall 

Ashland, Pa. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Dean's List. 

Robert Doane Martin 

Westfield, N. J. 
American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers; Track 1, 2, 3; Tombs. 

Ray C. Matulewicz 

Mt. Carmel, Pa. 
Boxing 1, 2, 3, Co-Captain 3. 

Eleanor Mayes 

Durham, N. C. 
Kappa Delta; Town Girls' Club, Cor- 
responding Secretary 3. 

Jerome S. Menaker 

1 Ifiri isbuiq, P<i. 
Duke Players; P e g r a m Chemistry 
Club; Sophomore Honors; Columbia 
Literary Society; Dean's List; Delta 
Phi Alpha 




Joseph W. Meyer 

East Orange, N. J. 
Delta Tau Delta. 

Stanley Meyerson 

Spartanburg, S. C. 
Kappa Kappa Psi; Georgia Tech. 1 
Chronicle 2, 3, Society Editor 3 
Band 2, 3; Columbia Literary Society 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Ruth Michler 

Easton, Pa. 
Pi Beta Phi; Archive 3; Dean's List. 

Mary Miller 

Flushing, N. Y. 
Nereidian Club; Dean's List. 

Edmund S. L. Miller 

Hamburg, Pa. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Glee Club; Choir; 
Wrestling. 

Jean Marian Miller 

Washington, D. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi; May Day 2; Social 
Standards Committee; CHANTI- 
CLEER 3. 



122 



Juniors 





V. E. Miller 
M. Moore 
Muse 



W. J. Miller 
Mary Moore 
Myres 



Milnes 
Morris 
Neuburger 



Virginia Evelyn Miller 

Newark, N. J. 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3; 
Music Study Club. 

William J. Miller, Jr. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Randolph Oilman Milnes 

Rahway, N. J. 
Rutgers University 1, 2. 

Kathryn Louise Montague 

Durham, N. C. 
Kappa Delta Pi; Dean's List; French 
Salon, Secretary 3. 



Marion Moore 

Charleston, W. Va. 
Pi Beta Phi. 

Mary Moore 

Delray Beach, Fla. 
Alpha Delta Pi. 



Montague F. P. Moore H. H. Moore 

Morse Motley Munster 

Newbold Newcomb Newton 



Jesse P. Muse 

Savannah, Ga. 
Delta Tau Delta. 



Hillman Myres 

Gainesville, Fla. 
Track 1, 2, 3. 



Harry Morris 
Chester, Pa. Charles Rentall Neuburger 

Kappa Sigma; Soccer 3; Phi Eta Maplewood, N. ]. 

Sigma. Delta Tau Delta. 



W. A. Morse 

Lakemont, Ga. 
Track 1, 2, 3; Cross-Country 1, 2, 3; 
Tombs. 



Arch Newbold 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Fredrick Porter Moore, Jr. 

East Gardner, Mass. 
Phi Kappa Sigma. 

Huber Hanes Moore 

China Grove, N. C. 
Track 1, 2, 3; Tombs. 



Carvelle Douglas Motley 

Charleston, W. Va. 
American Institute of Electrical En- 
gineers. 

Half F. W. Munster 

Savannah, Ga. 
Heidelberg University; Dean's List. 



Virginia Newcomb 

Hilton, N. Y. 



Holmes E. Newton 

Summit, N. ]. 
Delta Tau Delta; CHANTICLEER 1, 2, 
3; Dean's List. 



123 




Juniors 



Nicholas 
Ondek 
L. Parker 



Nicholson 

Ould 

T. Parker 



Nicks Nothdurft O'Brien Ockermann 

W. Owen M. Owen Pait Palmgren 

Pate C. Patterson G. Patterson R. Patterson 



Donald Y. Nicholas 

Scranton, Pa. 

Mariana Nicholson 

Statesville, N. C. 
Kappa Delta; Peace Junior College 
1, 2. 

Robert Lee Nicks 

Cedar Grove, N. C. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Chronicle 1; 
Freshman Council; Sophomore "Y" 
Council. 



William Herman Nothdurft 

Salamanca, N. Y. 
Delta Phi Alpha. 

James Coyne O'Brien 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Pi K'.ir... Alpha; Soccer 2, 3. 



Kenneth Russell Ockermann 
Berea, Ky. 
Sigma Nu; Berea College 1, 2. 



John P. Ondek, Jr. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Dorothy Sue Ould 

Roanoke, Va. 
Delta Delta Delta; Penn Hail Junior 
College 1, 2; Glee Club 3; Duke 
Players 3; Dean's List. 

William N. Owen 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

Margaret Owen 

Cuthborl, Gd. 
Alpha Delta Pi. 

James A. Pait 

Baltimore, Md. 
Choir 2, 3; Classical Club 2, 3; 
Dean's List. 

Einar Alexander Palmgren, Jr. 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Band 1, 2, 3; Columbia Literary So- 
ciety; Kappa Kappa Psi. 




Lentz Kegley Parker 

Pembroke, Va. 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute 1, 2; 
Dean's List. 

Tekla Parker 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

Nancy Pate 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta. 

Carroll Patterson 

Miami, Fla. 
Pi Beta Phi; Florida State College 1, 2. 

George E. Patterson 

Macon, ^Aa. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Beta Omega 
Sigma. 

Richard A. Patterson 

Glens Falls, N. Y. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



124 



Juniors 







Pepper 


Perine 


Petersen 


Peterson 


Phinney 


Pippen 


Plaster 


Plumb 


Poole 


Powell 


Prindle 


Pruitt 



Joseph A. Pell, Jr. 

Pilot Mountain, N. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi. 

Fernando D. Penabaz 

Jobabo, Cuba 

John Pepper 

Memphis, Tenn. 
Kappa Alpha; Dean's List. 

Everett G. Perine 

East Orange, N. J. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Track 1; Cheer Leader 
1, 2; Chronicle 1, 2, 3, Editor 3; Fresh- 
man Council; Publications Board 3; 
CHANTICLEER 2. 

Arthur M. Petersen 

Lynbrook, N. Y. 
Kappa Sigma. 

Nancy Peterson 

Woodbury, N. J. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Class Vice 
President 3; Sorority Pan-Hellenic 
Council 2, 3; Social Standards 3. 



Paul Hereschel Pettit 

Ocean City, N. J. 
Delta Tau Delta; Pegram Chemistry 
Club; CHANTICLEER 1. 

Helen Phillips 

Lexington, N. C. 
Kappa Delta; Choir; Glee Club. 

Carleton C. Phinney 

Newtonville, Mass. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Jean Ann Pippen 

Charleston, W. Va. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Pi Mu Epsilon; 
Phi Theta Kappa; Gulf Park College 
1; Nereidian Club 2, 3. 

William Emory Plaster, Jr. 

Leesburg, Va. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Archive 2, 3; Duke 
Players 2, 3. 

Charles S. Plumb 

Edgewood, R. I. 
Delta Tau Delta; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Band 1, 2; Symphony Orchestra 1; 
Tennis I; American Society of Civil 
Engineers. 



Kenneth A. Podger 

Kenmore, N. Y. 
Phi Delta Theta; Basketball 1, 2, 3. 

Betty Pollard 

Durham, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi. 

Helen Poole 

Troy, N. C. 
Dean's List. 

Elizabeth Powell 
Shreveport, La. 
Pi Beta Phi; Centenary College 1, 2; 
Dean's List. 

William M. Prindle 

West Harrington, R. I. 
Delta Tau Delta; Pegram Chemistry 
Club; Track 1; Soccer 3. 

Charles E. Pruitt 

Frederick, Md. 
Alpha Tau Omega; Track 1, 2, 3; 
Cross-Country 1, 3; Beta Omega 
Sigma. 



125 




Juniors 



Ramsey 


Rauschenberg 


Rawls 


Rea 


Reade 


Reel 


Reeves 


Reist 


B. Rice 


B. Rich 


W. Rich 


Richey 


E. Riley 


J. Riley 


Ritchie 


Roberts 


Rogan 


Rogers 



William H. Ramsey 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Delta Sigma Phi. 



II 



Lucy Rauschenberg 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Sandals; Fresh- 
man Adviser 2; Women's Athletic 
Association, Treasurer. 

Ashburn L. Rawls 

Nortoik, Va. 

Ruth Rea 
London, Ohio 



Pi Beta Phi. 

Marion Reade 

Durham, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi. 

W. Wiley Reel 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sigma Chi; Band 1, 2, 3. 



Virginia Reeves 

Canton, N. C. 
Kappa Delta. 

Anne Louise Reist 

Lancaster, Pa. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Chronicle 1, 2, 
3; CHANTICLEER 2, 3; Editor Fresh- 
man Handbook 3; Social Standards, 
Co-chairman 3. 

Learning M. Rice, Jr. 

WUdwood, N. J. 
American Society of Civil Engineers; 
Engineers' Club; Dean's List. 

Barbara Rich 

South Orange, N. J. 
Delta Delta Delta; Music Study Club; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3; Delta 
Phi Rho Alpha. 

Walton Rich 

I'orl Henry, N. Y. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Intramural Man- 
ager 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1; Choir 1. 

Virginia Richey 

Corinth, Miss. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Glee Club; 
Ward Belmont School 1, 2; Choir. 




Elizabeth Ril 

Durham, N. C. 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Kappa Delta Pi; So- 
cial Standards Committee; Chronicle 
2, 3; Town Girls' Club; CHANTI- 
CLEER 3; Dean's List. 

Joseph W. Riley 
Collingdale, Pa. 
Phi Delta Theta; Basketball 1, 2, 3; 
Golf 1, 2; Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs. 
Billy Ritchie 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Sigma Kappa; Delta Phi Alpha; Wo- 
men's Athletic Association Board 1, 
2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Choir 1; 
Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council 3; 
Delta Phi Rho Alpha. 

R. Winston Roberts, Jr. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Swimming 1; Sophomore "Y" Coun- 
cil; Dean'.=; List. 

Edna Carlton Rogan 

Baltimore, Md. 
Delta Delta Delta; Sorority Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council. 

Edwin D. Rogers 

Marlton, N. i. 
Keys Club; Dean's List; Delta Phi 
Alpha. 



126 



Juniors 





Rose Salmon Sapp Sasscer 

Schlesinger G. R. Scott J. G. Scott Scull 

Sharp Shaw Shehan Shelnutt 



Sawyer 

Seymour 

Shemet 



Schaub 
Shapiro 
Shepherd 



Merrill Mitchell Rose 

Lancaster, S. C. 
Tau Kappa Alpha. 

George Gilbert Salmon, Jr. 

Maplewood, N. J. 
Sigma Nu; Chronicle 1, 2; Pegram 
Chemistry Club. 

Clarence J. Sapp 

Albany, Ga. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Sigma Pi Sigma; Peg- 
gram Chemistry Club; 9019; Soph- 
omore Honors; Parker Physics award. 

Elizabeth Anne Sasscer 

Chevy Chase, Md. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Chronicle 3; 
Social Standards Committee; Sorority 
Pan-Hellenic Council 3. 

Walter W. Sawyer 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 



Willard Raphael Schlesinger 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Duke Players; Basket- 
ball 3. 

George Ryland Scott 

Detroit, Mich. 
Kappa Sigma. 

John G. Scott, Jr. 

Tamagua, Pa. 
Sigma Chi. 

Thomas R. Scull 

Somers Point, N. J. 
Freshman House President; Football 
1; Freshman Council. 

Dorothy Seymour 

Plainville, Conn. 
Sandals; Nereidian Club; Pegram 
Chemistry Club, Secretary 3; Delta 
Phi Alpha; Dean's List. 



Annie Hill Sharp 

Reidsville, N. C. 
Registered Nurse; Graduate of Duke 
Hospital. 

Philip S. Shaw 

Lawrence, Mass. 



W. Mason Shehan 

Easton, Md. 
Sigma Chi; Track 1, 2, 3; Beta Omega 
Sigma; Tombs; Sophomore Council; 
Junior Council. 

Harold Harper Shelnutt 

Tryon, N. C. 
Phi Kappa Sigma. 

Alexander Michael Shemet 

Jamaica, N. Y. 
American Institute of Electrical En- 
gineers, Secretary. 



Berkley V. Schaub Martin Z. Shapiro 

Westfield, N. J. New York, N. Y. Ashby Lee Shepherd 

Sigma Nu- Chronicle 1, 2, 3; Trident Assistant Manager of Tennis 1, Man- Bristol, Md. 

Club; Glee Club. ager 2. Keys Club. 



127 




Juniors 



Shields 
Skinner 
Frances Smith 



Sholes 
Slater 
F. Smith 



Shore 

Slay 

H. H. Smith 



Shuff 
Slingluff 
H. F. Smith 



Siehler 
Small 
K. Smith 



Sinnmons 
C. M. Smith 
W. R. Smith 



Richard A. Shields, Jr. 

Lev/es, Dei. 
Band 1, 2, 3; SymDhony Orchestra 
1, 2, 3. 

Dillard McCary Sholes, Jr. 

Duihciiii, N. C. 
Wrestling 1. 

Culver C. Shore 

Thomasville, N. C. 
9019; Dean's List. 

Charles Wesley ShuH, III 

Gl>;eiiVlllfc, N. C. 

Pi Kappa Phi; Sigma Upsilon; David- 
son College 1; Chronicle 2, 3; Ar- 
chive 2. 3. 

Charlotte Siehler 

Bciitimofft, Md 
Delta Delta Delta; Chronicle 3. 

William P. Simmons 

Bdiiibridge, Ga. 

Sigma Nu; Alpha Kappa Psi; Student 

Council 3; Columbia Literary Society, 

Treasurer 3; Chronicle 2; Dean's List. 



Virginia Elizabeth Skinner 

Durham, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi. 

Helen Slater 

Detroit, Mich. 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Sorority Pan-Hellenic 
Council 3. 

James Matthew Slay 

Greenville, N. C. 
Sigma Nu. 

Hambleton Slingluff, Jr. 

West Hartford, Conn. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, Delta Phi Alpha; 
Dean's List. 

Elizabeth F. Small 

Wyoming, N. J. 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Social Standards 
Committee; Chronicle 1, 2, 3. 

C. Manning Smith 

Charleston, W. Va. 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 




Frances Smith 

Easton, Pa. 
Pi Beta Phi; Distaff 1; Archive 2, 3. 

Franchelle Smith 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Woman's College, University of North 
Carolina. 

Haddon H. Smith 

Maplewood, N. J. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Kappa Kappa Psi; 
Delta Phi Alpha; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Band 1, 2, 3; Archive 1; Dean's List. 

Helen Eraser Smith 

Thotnasville, Ga. 
Pi Beta Phi; Chronicle 2, 3; Swim- 
ming 1. 

Kirby Smith, Jr. 

Washington, D. C. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; American So- 
ciety of Civil Engineers. 

William R. Smith 
Ashevilie, N. C. 
Football 1, 2. 



128 



Juniors 




Smoot 


Snook 


Snyder 


Southgate 


Speir 


Stallcup 


Steenrod 


Steiger 


Stephens 


Stewart 


H. J. Stone 


M. E. Stone 


Strother 


J. Stube 


W. Stube 


Sullivan 


Suplee 


Taliaferro 



William I. Smoot 

Seaford, Del. 
Phi Delta Theta; Sophomore Council; 
Beta Omega Siqma, Treasurer; Assist- 
ant Basketball Manager 1, 2, 3; Fresh- 
man Council. 

Edith Snook 
Summit, N. J. 
Student Council 3; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet 2, 3; Sandals; Music Study 
Club; Glee Club 1, 2; Dean's List. 
George P. Snyder, Jr. 
Ridgefield Park, N. J. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Delta Phi Alpha; Cross- 
country 1; Freshman Council; Soph- 
omore "Y" Council; Columbia Lit- 
erary Society. 

Tom F. Southgate, Jr. 
Durham, N. C. 
Alpha Tau Omega; Beta Omega Sig- 
ma; Class President 1, 3; Student 
Council 2; CHANTICLEER 1, 2, 3. 
Ross C. Speir 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Mary Jane Stallcup 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 
St. Petersburg Junior College 1. 



Robert L. Steenrod 

Liberty, N. Y. 
Delta Tau Delta; Pegram Chemistry 
Club. 

Howard P. Steiger 

Williamsport, Pa. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Kappa Kappa Psi; 
Bucknell University 1; Band 2, 3; 
Symphony Orchestra 2. 

Merrill York Stephens 

Portland, Maine 
Phi Kappa Psi; CHANTICLEER 3; 
Portland Junior College 1, 2. 

Robert P. Stewart 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Kappa Sigma; Phi Eta Sigma; Beta 
Omega Sigma; Sophomore Council- 
Sophomore "Y" Council; Band; Sym- 
phony Orchestra; Archive 2, 3. 

Harry James Stone 

Durham, N. C. 

Mary Elizabeth Stone 

Worcester, Mass. 
Nereidian Club. 



Edith Angelina Strother 

Durham, N. C. 
Town Girls' Club, Recording Secre- 
tary 3; Dean's List. 

Joy Stube 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Dean's List. 

William Stube 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers. 

H. G. Sullivan 

Anderson, S. C. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Ruth Suplee 

Narberth, Pa. 

Dick Taliaferro 

Columbia, S. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Football 1, 2, 3; Baseball I; Student 
Council 3. 



129 




Juniors 



Teed 


Thoman 


Thomas 


Toner 


Tritle 


Turlington 




Vail 


Van Nostrand 



Thompson Thornton Tobin 

Ulmer H. Upchurch K. M. Upchurch 

Vickers Wade 



Shirley Teed 
New York, N. Y. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Duke Players 
1, 2. 

John B. Thoman 

Youngstown, Ohio 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Mount Union Col 
leqe 1; Football 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3- 

Hayden Thomas 

Mui.hdll, Pd. 
Basketball 2, 3. 

Frances Gayle Thompson 

Greensboro, M. (..'. 
CHANTICLEER 2. 

Wilfred H. Thornton 

Jackson, Ga. 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Band 1, 2; Peqram 
Chemistry Club: Glee Club 1, 2. 

Mary Tobin 

Princeton, W. Va. 
Delta Delta Delta. 



Aimee L. Toner 

Garden City, N. Y. 
Zeta Tau Alpha; French Club; Duke 
Players. 

Catherine Tritle 

Erie, Pa. 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Chronicle 2, 3; Duke 

Players 1, 2, 3, Secretary 3; Y. W. 

C. A. Cabinet. 

David J. Turlington, II 
Clinton, N. C. 
Football 1; Tennis 1. 

David Ulmer 
Moorestown, N. J. 
Chronicle 1, 2; Archive 1. 

Herbert Jackson Upchurch 
Durham, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha; Phi Eta Sigma; Delta 
Phi Alpha; Beta Omega Sigma; Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3; Archive 1, 2, 3; Fresh- 
man Council, Secretary; Sophomore 
"Y" Council. 

Kathrine M. Upchurch 
Durham, N. C 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 2; Women's 
Athletic Board 2, 3; Sandals; Delta 
Phi Rho Alpha; Class President 2; 
Junior Big Sisters, Secretary. 




Charles Rowe Vail 

Ocean City, N. J. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon; 9019; 
Freshman Honors; Sophomore Hon- 
ors; American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers; Engineers' Club. 



Norman W. Van Nostrand, Jr. 

New York, N. Y. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Sophomore Hon- 
ors; Trident Club; Junior Pan-Hellenic 
Council; Alpha Kappa Psi. 



Mary Vickers 

Oxiord, N. C. 
Kappa Delta; Nereidian Club 1, 2, 3; 
Glee Club 1; Choir 1. 



Charles B. Wade, Jr. 

Morehedd Cily, N. C. 
Kappa Kappa Psi; Band 1, 2, 3; 
Symphony Orchestra 1, 2; Columbia 
Literary Society 1. 



130 



Juniors 







Waits 
Welfare 
M. White 



R. Walker 

Wenrich 

Whitley 



C. Walker 

Weston 

Wilkes 



Warren 
Whitaker 



Ann Wagner 

Jamaica, N. Y. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Social Stand- 
ards Committee. 

Josephine Wagner 

West Chester, Pa. 

Harriet Waits 

Andalusia, Ala. 
Kappa Delta. 

Richard Leigh Walker 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sigma Nu. 

Clark Walter, Jr. 

Washington, D. C. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Beta Omega Sigma: Duke Players 2, 
3; 9019; Dean's List. 

Mary Louise Warren 

Richmond, Va. 
Dean's List. 



Margaret E. Washburn 



Hempstead, N. Y. 
Kappa Delta. 

Ella Harriss Waters 

Washington, N. C. 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Sandals; Social 
Standards Committee. 

Bradley Welfare 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Beta Omega Sigma; Chronicle 1, 2. 

Charles D. Wenrich 

Washington, D. C. 
Sigma Chi; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Chronicle 1, 2, 3; Assistant Basketball 
Manager 2, 3; Track 1; Freshman 
House President. 

Robert Lewis Weston 

Kensington, Md. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Sigma Pi Sigma. 

Richard B. Whitaker 

Whiteville, N. C. 



Katherine E. White 



Elizabeth, N. L 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Sandals; Student 
Government 3; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Choir; Alspaugh 
House President; Delta Phi Alpha; 
Dean's List. 



Marge White 

Jenkintown, Pa. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Nereidian 
Club; Sandals; Women's Athletic 
Board, Vice President; Delta Phi Rho 
Alpha, President. 



Carl M. Whitley 

Clayton, N. C. 
Baseball 1, 3. 



John Edwin Wilkes 
Trenton, N. J. 
Kappa Sigma; Norwich University 1; 
Rutgers University 2; Chronicle 3. 



131 




Juniors 



Wilkinson M. Williams P. H. Williams W. R. Williams S. E. Williams Willis 

Wilson Womack Womble D. L. Wood R. C. Wood Woodard 

Wright Wunder Zambone Zecher 



Robert A. Wilkinson 

Millburn, N. J. 
Delta Tau Delta; Duke Players; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet 3. 

Mildred Cordier Willianns 

Grf-enville, Ky. 
Debating 2; Debating Club 2, 3; 
Dean's List. 

Pleasant H. Williams 

Ashldiid, Ky. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Football 1, 2, 3. 

William Robert Williams 
Laurel, Del. 

Alpha Tau Omega; Archive 1; Trident 

Club. 

Sarah Elsie Williams 

l::iiX(ilj<-tli City, N .C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Glee Club 1, 2, 
3; Chior 1, 2, 3; Dean's List. 

Rebecca Willis 

;jlireve[j(jit, Lci. 
Pi Beta Phi; Centenary College 1, 2. 



Donald Ross Wilson 

Greenlawn, N. Y. 
Pi Kappa Phi; Swimming 1, 2, 3; 
Tombs. 

Sarah Sue Womack 

Murfreesboro, Tenn. 
Delta Delta Delta; Ward-B el m o nt 
College 1, 2. 

William F. Womble 

V/mstoii-Salcni, N. C. 
Phi Delta Theta; Phi Eta Sigma, Pres- 
ident 2; Beta Omega Sigma; Chron- 
icle 1, 2, 3; 9019; Dean's List. 

Doris L. Wood 

Mount Morris, N. Y. 
Sigma Kappa. 

Robert C. Wood 
Lewisburg, W. Va. 
Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Eta Sigma, 
Vice President; Delta Phi Alpha; Peg- 
ram Chemistry Club; Beta Omega 
Sigma, President; Student Council, 
Secretary-Treasurer 3; Publications 
Board 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3. 

Harry Clanton Woodard 

Louisville, Ky. 
Football 1; Track 1, 2, 3; Tombs. 




Walter C. Wright, Jr. 

Wenonah, N. J. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Glee Club 2; Band 
1; Choir 1; Polity Club; Dean's List. 



Clarence Edmond Wunder, Jr. 

Ardmore, Pa. 
Sigma Chi; Cross-Country, Manager 
3. 



Joseph Harry Zambone, HI 

Vineland, N. J. 
Swimming 1, 2; Track 3. 



Margaret Ann Zecher 

Lebduon, Pd. 
Delta Delta Delta; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Choir 1, 2, 3; Music Study Club 3; 
Social Standards Committee. 



132 




SOPHOMORES 




Sophomores 



Adams, Aitken, Allen, Anastor, Anderson, H. Anderson, M. Anderson, Andrews. 

Arnold, R. Arnold, Atzrodt, Auld, Baggs, Bailey, Baird, Bane. 

Barnett, Barry, Baum, Beard, Beatty, Becker, Beebe, Belding. 

Bell, Bender, Beneke, Benton, Berkowitz, Beyer, Bierstein, M. Bierstein. 




Margaret Adams, Esterly, Pa. 

Lois Aitken, South Orange, N. J. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Jayne Kathryn Alien, Miami, Fla. 
Delta Delta Delta 

Herbert P. Anastor, Vineiand, N. J. 

A. L. Anderson, Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Phi Kappa Psi 

Howard A. Anderson, Mullins, S. C. 

Mary Anderson, New Bern, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Melvin B. Andrews, Goldsboro, N. C. 

A. G. Arnold, Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Robert H. Arnold, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

R. A. Atzrodt, Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Alpha Phi 



Fan Auld, Charleston, W. Va. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Genevieve Baggs, Newark, Ohio 

J. Eugene Bailey, Fort V/ayne, Ind. 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Phi Eta Sigma. 

John W. Baird, Henderson, Tenn. 

David Morgan Bane, Uniontown, Pa. 

Hoyt Barnett, Lakeland, Fla. 

Edward Earl Barry, Lansdowne, Pa. 
Sigma Chi 

Ralph E. Baum, Kitty Hawk, N. C. 

Edward P. A. Beard, Rockville, Md. 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Robert Rowe Beatty, Charlotte, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha 



Kathryn Becker, Chicago, 111. 
Estella Beebe, Lewes, Del. 
Gordon Belding, Summit, N. J. 
Mary Bell, Greensburg, Pa. 



Mary Charlotte Bender, Lititz, 
Sigma Kappa 



Pa. 



C. C. Beneke, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Annette Benton, Fremont, N. C. 

Sylvia Berkowitz, AUentown, Pa. 
Alpha Epsilon Phi 

Emil C. Beyer, V/hite Plains, N. Y. 
Phi Delta Theta 

J. F. Bierstein, Jr., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Marie Bierstein, Shenandoah, Pa. 



134 



Sophomores 





Bishop, Blackburn, Blanchard, L. Blanchard, Bliss, Bodine, Boger, Bogert. 
Bolte, Bowen, Bowers, Bowman, W. Bowman, Bradsher, Brahany, Bransford. 
Braznell, Bremer, Bretz, Brinn, Brooker, Brown, Brundage, Buckingham. 
Buell, Buffington, Burns, Butler, Bynum, Caldwell, Cameron, Campbell. 



Virginia Bishop, Vineland, N. J. 

L. E. Blackburn, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Irvin C. Blanchard, Portsmouth, Va. 

Lillian C. Blanchard, Hertford, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Joan Bliss, Nashville, Tenn. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

William B. Bodine, Cranford, N. J. 
Kappa Kappa Psi 

Paull B. Boger, Morganton, N. C. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Betty J. Bogert, Ridgewood, N. J. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Henry F. Bolte, Elmhurst, N. Y. 

Dan D. Bowen, Atlanta, Ga. 

L. R. Bowers, Whiteville, N. C. 

135 



T. E. Bowman, Jr., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Sigma Chi; Kappa Kappa Psi. 

W. M. Bowman, Lumberton, N. C. 

A. B. Bradsher, Jr., Montreal, Canada 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Mary J. Brahany, Washington, D. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Paul W. Bransford, Anderson, Ind. 
Phi Kappa Psi 

Virginia Braznell, Miami, Fla. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Roger Edward Bremer, Elmira, N. Y. 
Phi Kappa Psi 

George W. Bretz, Bethlehem, Pa. 

William J. Brinn, Sanford, N. C. 

Roberta Brooker, Evanston, 111. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 



William E. Brown, Newtown, Pa. 

Oliver Brundage, Upland, Pa. 
Kappa Sigma 

Walter Buckingham, Bradford, Pa. 

Marion Buell, Rochester, N. Y. 
Kappa Delta 

Adelaide Buffington, Berkshire, N. Y. 

Arthur G. Burns, Upper Darby, Pa. 

Frances Butler, Camilla, Ga. 
Phi Mu 

G. T. Bynum, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

John C. Caldwell, Greensboro, N. C. 

Edward Cameron, Pine View, N. C. 

Isaac J. Campbell, Clover, S. C. 




Sophomores 



Campbell, Cannon, Carl, J. Carl, Caroon, Carpenter, Carson, Carter. 
Carter, Chapman, Clark, H. Clark, M. Clark, R. Clark, Clay, Cleaver. 
Clement, Clements, Clover, Cobleigh, Cockrell, Coen, Coffman, Cole. 
Colson, Cooke, Cooley, Cooper, Cope, Courtney, Couse, Cousins. 



Jean Campbell, Douglaston, N. Y. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

E. Cannon, Murlreesboro, Tenn. 

Herbert A. Carl, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Joseph M. Carl, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

W. J. Caroon, Jr., New Bern, N. C. 

John G. Carpenter, Hague, N. Y. 

W. L. Carson, Cleveland, Ohio 
Phi Kappa Sigma 

Mary E. Carter, Nashville, Tenn. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Virginia Carter, Wadesboro, N. C. 
Pi Beta Phi 

Lucy Lake Chapman, Richmond, Va. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

George W. (^l-irk, Waterloo, N. Y. 



H. V. Clark, Jr., Richmond Hill, N. Y. 
Phi Kappa Sigma 

McCauley Clark, Philadelphia, Tenn. 

Richard S. Clark, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Albert G. Clay, Mount Sterling, Ky. 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Helen Paul Cleaver, Merion, Pa. 

Robert Clement, Durham, N. C. 

Madge Clements, Buena Vista, Ga. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Carl Clover, Knox, Pa. 

N. S. Cobleigh, White Plains, N. Y. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Helen Cockrell, Detroit, Mich. 
Alpha Delta Pi 




T. G. Coen, Jr., Bay Shore, N. Y. 
Delta Tau Delta 

Julia Coffman, Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Jeanne Cole, Collingswood, N. J. 
Phi Mu 

James T. Colson, Jr., Brunswick, Ga. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Russell Y. Cooke, Jr., Kenilworth, 111. 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Phi Eta Sigma 

Eleanor Cooley, Berwyn, Md. 

S. A. Cooper, New London, Conn. 

Jane Cope, McKeesport, Pa. 

W. M. Courtney, Charlotte, N. C. 
Delta Sigma Phi 

Ruth Couse, Baltimore, Md. 
Pi Beta Phi 

James F. Cousins, Durham, N. C. 

136 



Sophomores 




Covington, Cox, R. Cox, Cozart, Crannell, Crawford, Critcher, Cure. 
Curtiss, Daniel, Darling, Davis, P. Davis, Dearstyne, DeCamp, Dennis. 
Densberger, Deupree, DeVoe, Dewey, Diamond, Dick, Dickerson, DiSabatino. 
Dives, Dodd, Doniger, Doyle, Drake, Draper, Dunn, Eakin. 



J. W. Covington, Rockingham, N. C. James C. Davis, Greenville, Pa. 



Nathan Cox, Clarkton, N. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi 

Robert L. Cox, Mount Olive, N. C. 

David L. Cozart, Jr., Raleigh, N. C. 

W. H. Crannell, Jr., Albany, N. Y. 
Delta Tau Delta 

A. C. Crawford, Elmira Heights, N. Y. 
Phi Eta Sigma 

R. A. Critcher, III, Williamston, N. C. 

Jack C. Cure, Pine Hill, N. Y. 

Gordon W. Curtiss, Jr., Atlanta, Ga. 
Delta Tau Delta 

Annie Whitty Daniel, Durham, N. C. 
Kappa Delta 

Byron C. Darling, New York, N. Y. 
137 



Pauline Davis, Roanoke, Va. 
Phi Mu 

Ruth Dearstyne, Port Chester, N. Y. 

Jean DeCamp, Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Frank D. Dennis, Morristown, N. J. 
Phi Eta Sigma 

R. S. Densberger, Kenmore, N. Y. 

William J. Deupree, Ft. Mitchell, Ky. 

Charles W. DeVoe, Warren, Ohio 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Marguerite Dewey, Goldsboro, N. C. 
Kappa Delta 

Shirley Diamond, Jamaica, N. Y. 
Alpha Epsilon Phi 



Dorothy Dick, Copperhill, Tenn. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Jean Dickerson, Schenectady, N. Y. 
Pi Beta Phi 

M. A. DiSabatino, Wilmington, Del. 

Ann Dives, Reading, Pa. 
Phi Mu 

Donald R. Dodd, Allentown, Pa. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Walter J. Doniger, Passaic, N. J. 

Robert S. Doyle, Washington, D. C. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Carl R. Drake, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Nona Ruth Draper, Richlands, Va. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Idaliza Dunn, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

LeRoy Eakin, Washington, D. C. 
Alpha Tau Omega 




Sophomores 



East, Edwards, J. Edwards, L. Edwards, W. Edwards, Eltinge, Emerson, Ewing. 
Fager, Fair, Farnsworth, Farrar, Faulkner, Feagins, Ferguson, R. Ferguson. 
Fernalld, Fickes, Fine, Finn, Fite, Fischer, Fitzpatrick, Fleming. 
Flenner, Forness, Foster, Foulke, Fox, Frampton, Franz, Fraser. 




Jane East, East Orange, N. J. 
Pi Beta Phi 

Fred C. Edwards, Bloomsburg, Pa. 
Phi Delta Theta 

J. Francis Edwards, Oxford, N. C. 

L. M. Edwards, Jr., Durham, N. C. 
Phi Delta Theta 

W. Joe Edwards, Clearwater, Fla. 

William S. Eltinge, Kingston, N. Y. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 

I5orothy Emerson, Atlanta, Ga. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Nathaniel D. Ewing, Vincennes, Ind. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Joseph S. Fager, Camp Hill, Pa. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

D. Arthur Fair, Altoona, Pa. 

T. A. Farnsworth, Camden, N. Y. 
Delta Tau Delta 



R. Danny Farrar, Youngstown, Ohio 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Clifford Faulkner, Elmhurst, N. Y. 
Delta Tau Delta 

Carroll S. Feagins, Baxley, Ga. 

B. Troy Ferguson, Jr., Raleigh, N. C. 

R. E. Ferguson, Jr., Clinton, S. C. 

Thomas D. Fernalld, Norwich, N. Y. 
Delta Tau Delta 

William H. Fickes, Newport, Pa. 

Milton Fine, Hattiesburg, Miss. 
Zeta Beta Tau; Phi Eta Sigma 

Thomas D. Finn, Shelton, Conn. 

Jane Fite, Jasper, Ala. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 



C. H. Fischer, Jr., West Haven, Conn. 

F. J. Fitzpatrick, Jr., Maplewood, N. J. 

Roy Fleming, Wenonah, N. J. 
Kappa Sigma 

G. B. Flenner, Jr., East Orange, N. J. 

Cameron Forness, Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Helen Foster, Asheville, N. C. 

William T. Foulke, Collamer, Pa. 

Marguerite A. Fox, Ardmore, Pa. 

George T. Frampton, Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Carl H. Franz, Jr., York, Pa. 
Kappa Sigma 

Elizabeth Fraser, Fort Bragg, N. C. 
Alpha Phi 

138 



Sophomores 





:^^; '1^ i.. 




pmng 



Fritz, Fulton, Funkhouser, Gair, Gale, Gannon, Garber, Gassaway. 
Geraci, Gerard, Gibbons, Gillis, Glagola, Gonder, R. Gonder, Gorin. 
Gould, Graber, Grainger, Graves, Gray, W. Gray, Greenawalt, Greenfield. 
Greenwood, Griffin, Griffith, Griffiths, Groves, Gutierrez, Haardt, Hackney. 



Albert R. Fritz, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Virginia Fulton, Roanoke, Va. 
Phi Mu 

J. O. Funkhouser, Hagerstown, Md. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Russell A. Gair, Jr., Norwich, N. Y. 

Elmer Thomas Gale, Clinton, N. C. 
Phi Kappa Sigma 

Paul Gannon, Glen Rock, N. J. 

Murray R. Garber, Bradford, Pa. 
Phi Eta Sigma 

Jane Gassaway, Nashville, N. C. 
Kappa Delta 

Salvatore U. Geraci, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Frank T. Gerard, Jr., Grenada, Miss. 
Kappa Alpha; Kappa Kappa Psi 

Betty Gibbons, Wilson, N. C. 



139 



Philip Hugh Gillis, Arlington, N. J. 
Kappa Sigma 

Charles Glagola, Rahway, N. J. 

Lindsay A. Gonder, Oakland, Md. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Richard J. Gonder, Oakland, Md. 

J. J. Gorin, Christobal, Canal Zone 
Zeta Beta Tau 

Robert Kent Gould, Hamburg, N. J. 

H. T. Graber, Jr., Detroit, Mich. 

Virginia Grainger, Washington, D. C. 
Delta Delta Delta 

James E. Graves, Richmond, Va. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Betty Claire Gray, Gastonia, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi 



W. A. Gray, Jr., Ridley Park, Pa. 

Robert Greenawalt, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

B. H. Greenfield, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Phi Eta Sigma 

W. Greenwood, St. Albans, N. Y. 

Pi Beta Phi 

Virginia Griffin, Baltimore, Md. 
Kappa Delta 

James Griffith, Harrisburg, Pa. 

W. H. Griffiths, Great Neck, N. Y. 

Joe A. Groves, Charleston, W. Va 

R. E. Gutierrez, Merida, Yuc, Mexico 

Werner W. Haardt, Montclair, N. J. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 

Elmore Hackey, Durham, N. C. 
Phi Delta Theta 




Sophomores 



Hadley, Hall, Hamilton, Hammond, Hardwicke, Hargett, Harrell, Harris. 
Harvin, Hathaway, Hawks, Hawley, Hayward, Hedrick, Heise, Hempelnnan. 
Hench, Herring, Herrmann, Hess, Heyward, Hickey, Hill, D. Hill. 
Hill, Hoag, Hock, Hoffman, G. Hoffman, R. Hoffman, Holden, Holland. 



Otto E. Hadley, Wailkill, N. Y. 

Charles Edward Hall, Ashland, Ky. 

R. A. Hamilton, Ridgefield Park, N. ]. 
Delta Sigma Phi 

Wilmer Hammond, Selbyville, Del. 

R. E. Hardwicke, Fort Worth, Texas 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Le G. J. Hargett, Forrest City, Ark. 

H. L. Harrell, Rich Square, N. C. 

Joe Frank Harris, Raleigh, N. C. 

Mane Harvin, Summerton, S. C. 
Sigma Kappa 

George W. Hathaway, Bellaire, Ohio 
Phi Kappa Psi 



Brenna Hawley, Kenilworth, 111. 

Doris Hayward, Delanco, N. J. 

Dorothy Hedrick, Salisbury, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Kenneth C. Heise, Berwyn, 111. 

Marion Hempelman, St. Louis, Mo. 

W. S. Hench, Jr., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

B. M. Herring, Greenville, N. C. 

Ruth Herrmann, Baltimore, Md. 
Pi Beta Phi 

Robert E. Hess, Fairmont, W. Va. 
Sigma Chi 



A. J. Hickey, Staten Island 

Alan Hill, Westfield, N. J. 

Davidson Hill, Sasser, Ga. 
Sigma Nu 

Dora Hill, Cuthbert, Ga. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

J. E. Hoag, Holyoke, Mass. 

Charles W. Hock, Bluefield, W. Va. 




C. Robert Hoffman, Easton, 
Phi Kappa Psi 



Pa. 



Gish N. Hoffman, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Richard Hoffman, Cincinnati 
Delta Tau Delta 



Ohio 



Charlotte Holden, High Point, N. C. 



Charles E. Hawks, New York, N. Y. M. G. Heyward, Asheville, N. C. 



Mary B. Holland, New Bern, 
Kappa Alpha Theta 



N. C. 



140 



Sophomores 





Hollmeyer, Hollowell, Holly, Holt, Hottenstein, Houchens, Hubbell, Hudson. 
Huffman, Hughes, Hutchinson, Hunsicker, Huntington, Hutchinson, Idema, Jenkins. 
Jenkinson, Jerome, Johnston, Jones, E. Jones, L. Jones, M. Jones, T. Jones. 
V. Jones, W. Jones, Josephs, Kale, Kaye, Keane, Kelleher, Kelly. 



A. Hollmeyer, Mountain Lakes, N. J. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 

L. Robert Hollowell, Hertford, N. C. 
Pi Kappa Alpha 

Helen K. Holly, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Sigma Kappa 

Betty Holt, Wayland, Mass. 

R. L. Hottenstein, Millersburg, Pa. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Douglas Houchens, Richmond, Va. 

Robert Hubbell, Decatur, Ga. 

Boyd E. Hudson, Jr., Bellehaven, Va. 

Dorothy Huffman, Asheville, N. C. 

Ann M. Hughes, Foxboro, Mass. 

R. A. Hutchison, Forest Hills, N. Y. 
141 



R. W. Hunsicker, Ft. Washington, Pa. Louise Jones, Charlotte, N. C. 



Eleanor Huntington, Rutherford, N. J. 
Sigma Kappa 

W. H. Hutchinson, La Grange, 111. 
Pi Kappa Alpha 

Mary L. Idema, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Barbara Jane Jenkins, Scranton, Pa. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Harvey T. Jenkinson, Bellevue, Pa. 
Phi Kappa Psi 

W. G. Jerome, Winston-Salem, N. C 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Nancy C. Johnston, Lexington, Ky. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Curtis H. Jones, Townsend, Va. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Elizabeth Jones, New Bern, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 



Margaret L. Jones, Durham, N. C. 
Kappa Delta 

Thomas O. Jones, High Point, N. C. 

Virginia Jones, Wheeling, W. Va. 
Pi Beta Phi 

W. W. Jones, Wilmington, Del. 

Alex Josephs, Charlotte, N. C. 
Beta Theta Pi 

Richard B. Kale, Troutman, N. C. 
Pi Kappa Alpha 

D. Griffith Kaye, Troy, N. Y. 
Delta Sigma Phi 

Richard C. Keane, Petersburg, Va. 

Ruth Kelleher, Audubon, N. J. 

Edward H. Kelly, Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Sophomores 



Kenney, Kerman, Kern, Kerr, Kimbrell, King, Kirkpatrick, Kirkw^ood. 
Kirsch, Klemme, Knapp, Knight, R. Knight, Koger, Koop, Kraenner. 
Kuemper, Kuperman, Kurtznnann, Lacks, Lannbert, Lannpe, Landis, Larsen. 
Laupp, Lowder, Lawrence, Leavenworth, Ledbetter, Leiby, Leiter, Lenox. 



Helene Kenney, Ridgewood, N. J. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

H. D. Kerman, W. Palm Beach, Fla. 

Jean Kern, Washington, D. C. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Chi Delta Phi 

J. L. Kerr, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

M. R. Kimbrell, Jr., Charlotte, N. C. 

Ruth King, St. Pauls, N. C. 

Frances Kirkpatrick, Salisbury, N. C. 

Merle Kirkwood, Hattiesburg, Miss. 
Delta Delta Delta 

Jack Kirsch, Rockingham, N. C. 

Evelyn Klemme, Belleville, 111. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Robert S. Knapp, Belleville, III. 



Arthur W. Knight, Durham, N. C. 

Richard W. Knight, Middletown, N. Y. 

Robert McM. Koger, Charleston, S. C. 

Charles T. Koop, Islip, N. Y. 

Charles G. Kraemer, Scranton, Pa. 

M. Lee Kuemper, New York, N. Y. 

Jesse P. Kuperman, Jersey City, N. J. 
Zeta Beta Tau; Phi Eta Sigma 

Beverly Kurtzmann, Maplewood, N. J. 
Pi Beta Phi 

Bernard S. Lacks, Quincy, Mass. 

Doris E. Lambert, Ironton, Ohio 
Kappa Alpha Theta 



William Lee Lamps, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Phi Delta Theta 



W. B. Landis, Jr., Scranton, 
Phi Kappa Sigma 



Pa. 



Doris Larsen, West Englewood, 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 



N. J. 



Ann Laupp, Wheeling, W. 
Pi Beta Phi 



Vc 



R. C. Lowder, Havre de Grace, Md. 



Mary Lawrence, Reading, 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Pa. 



R. Leavenworth, New Haven, Conn. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 



Martha Ledbetter, Rockingham, 
Alpha Delta Pi 



N. C. 



Rowland W. Leiby, Jr., Raleigh, N. C. 
Roy A. Leiter, Jr., Hagerstown, Md. 
Walter S. Lenox, Richfield Park, N. J. 

142 



Sophomores 





Lentz, Lewis, J. Lewis, Leyrer, Licht, Little, Littlejohn, Lockwood. 

Long, G. Long, J. Long, Love, Lucas, Lundy, E. Lundy, Lutz. 

Lyon, MacBride, MacDonald, McAdams, McArthur, McCann, McCaskill, McCauley. 

McChesney, McConnb, McCoy, McCracken, McDonough, McFalls, McGarity, McGarrity. 



Julian C. Lentz, Jr., Durham, N. C. 



Germaine Lewis, New York, N. Y. 
Pi Beta Phi 

Jessica Lewis, Baltimore, Md. 

William C. Leyrer, Bay Shore, N. Y. 

Philip C. Licht, Stapleton, N. Y. 

J. C. Little, Raleigh, N. C. 
Kappa Sigma 

Ethel T. Littlejohn, Leesburg, Va. 
Kappa Delta 

John A. Lockwood, Verona, N. J. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Arthur R. Long, Birmingham, Ala. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

George B. Long, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Sigma Chi 

John William Long, Norfolk, Va. 



Jane Love, Washington, D. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Chester L. Lucas, Hopkinton, Mass. 
Phi Kappa Psi 

Edwin Lundy, Maplewood, N. J. 

Eleanor Lundy, Troy, N. Y. 
Kappa Delta 

Carl Lutz, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Eugene Lyon, Durham, N. C. 

Lucy MacBride, Nutley, N. J. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

R. W. MacDonald, Bl'mf'ld H'ls.Mich. 

Eloise McAdams, Belmont, N. C. 

R. M. McArthur, Winston-S'em, N. C. 



Walter R. McCann, Petersburg, Va. 
Pi Mu Epsilon; Delta Phi Alpha 

David D. McCaskill, Marianna, Fla. 
Kappa Alpha 

J. Y. McCauley, Hagerstown, Md. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Ruth McChesney, Freehold, N. J. 

Martyne McComb, Bluemont, Va. 

John O. McCoy, Glen Jean, W. Va. 
Kappa Alpha 

Charles W. McCracken, Merion, Pa. 
B. W. McDonough, Terryville, Conn. 
John B. McFalls, Gastonia, N. C. 
John H. McGarity, Charlotte, N. C. 
Jack A. McGarrity, Trenton, N. J. 



143 




Sophomores 



Mack, Main, Mangum, Mann, Mansell, March, Marchant, Marshall. 
Martin, Mason, Mathews, H. Mathews, Mathey, Maxwell, Meiklejohn, Miller. 
C. Miller, K. Miller, R. Miller, Ruth Miller, Minor, Moffitt, Molloy, Moneyhun. 
Montgomery, Moran, Moritz, Morris, Morton, Muelberger, MeuUer, Mullinax. 



E. V. T. Mack, Rutherfordton, N. C. 

]. Fulton Main, Kingston, N. Y. 

Doris Mangum, Rougemont, N. C. 

]. Wilton Mann, Durham, N. C. 

Jack Mansell, Maplewood, N. J. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Margaret Ann March, Mobile, Ala. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Charles K. Marchant, Verona, N. J. 

William Marshall, Vinton, Va. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Charles Martin, Leaksville, N. C. 

Fred C. Mason, Upper Darby, Pa. 

E. G. Mathews, Hamden, Conn. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 



H. S. Mathews, Charleston, W. Va. F. M. Moffitt, Rockville Cent 



Frank A Mathey, New York, N. Y. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

W. Maxwell, Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Louise Meiklejohn, Cheraw, S. C. 
Kappa Delta 

Dorothy Miller, Bethlehem, Pa. 
Phi Mu 

Charlotte Miller, Miami, Fla. 
Pi Beta Phi 

Kenneth R. Miller, Endwell, N. Y. 

R. W. Miller, Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 
Kappa Kappa Psi 

Ruth Miller, Newburgh, N. Y. 
Kappa Delta 

Ruth Minor, Batavia, N. Y. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 



R. Margaret Molloy, Iveyland 
Phi Mu 



Ariel Moneyhun, Johnson 
Kappa Alpha Theta 



J. S. Montgomery, White P 
William J. Moran, Richmond 




C 



John M. Moritz, Enka, N. 
Delta Sigma Phi 



C. 



J. Terry Morris, Florence, Ala. 

Margaret Morton, Charleston, W. Va. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Anna Muelberger, Maplewood, N. I. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 



Carl H. Meuller, Lakewood, 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



Oh 



lO 



B. L. Mullinax, Greenville, S. C. 



144 



Sophomores 





Murphy, Myers, Nailor, Naudain, Neel, Newens, Newsom, Nixon. 
Noble, Northrup, Opper, Ormond, Orton, Owens, W. Owens, Pace. 
Paredes, Parker, S. Parker, Patrick, V. Patrick, Pattillo, Pedersen, Pengelly. 
Perry, Peters, Pfann, Plumb, Pope, Potter, Price, Priest. 



V. L. Murphy, South Coventry, Conn. 

Dorothy D. Myers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Irvin L. Nailor, Jr., Camp Hill, Pa. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

L. P. Naudain, Haddon Heights, N. J. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Marguerite Neel, Thomasville, Ga. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Richard S. Newens, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Sigma Chi 

Mary Toms Newsom, Durham, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Pennington M. Nixon, Rome, Ga. 
Kappa Alpha 

Paul Noble, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

R. W. Northrup, Rutherford, N. J. 
Sigma Chi 

Nellie A. Opper, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Delta Delta Delta 



Margaret Ormond, Durham, N. C. 
Kappa Delta 

Stuart Orton, Rahway, N. J. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Alfred Lemuel Owens, Wilson, N. C. 

W. R. Owens, Jr., Covington, Va. 

Martha Pace, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Sigma Kappa 

P. E. Paredes, San Pedro Sula, C. A. 
Kappa Alpha 

Ruth Parker, Rockingham, N. C. 

Sarah Anne Parker, Vineland, N. J. 
Delta Delta Delta 

Patricia Patrick, Baltimore, Md. 
Sigma Kappa 

Virginia Patrick, Baltimore, Md. 
Sigma Kappa 



Robert R. Pattillo, Jr., Atlanta, Ga. 

Peder M. Pedersen, Durham, N. C. 

Donald A. Pengelly, Zanesville, Ohio 
Phi Kappa Psi. 

Norvin A. Perry, Jr., CarroUton, Ky. 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Frank S. Peters, Nanticoke, Pa. 

Harry F. Pfann, Mountain Lakes, N. J. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

John J. Plumb, Hackensack, N. J. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Harrell Pope, Dunn, N. C. 

Trudie Potter, Evanston, 111. 

Robert M. Price, Scranton, Pa. 
Sigma Chi 

Virginia Priest, Onset, Mass. 



145 








Sophomores 



Pulliam, Purnell, Quick, Rankin, Rebnrxan, Reinfeld, Richards, Richwine. 
Ricker, Rine, Ris, Ritter, Rocke, Roesch, Roesti, Rogers. 
Rohrbaugh, Rohrer, Rollings, Rose, Rosenthal, Rouse, Rouzer, Russell. 
Ryon, Sacknnan, Sager, Salmon, Sauer, Sawilosky, Sawyer, Scanlon. 



Samuel T. Pulliam, Richmond, Va. 

Oliver J. Purnell, Rockville, Conn. 

Leon W. Quick, Watertown, N. Y. 
Sigma Chi 

Sara E. Rankin, Gastonia, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

A. Fred Rebman, Courtland, Ala. 
Kappa Alpha 

G. Reinfeld, Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Jean Richards, West Hartford, Conn. 

J. R. Richwine, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Robert E. Ricker, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Clyde S. Rine, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Howard C. Ris, Freeport, N. Y. 
Phi Eta Sigma 



Richard Ritter, Vineland, N. J. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Helen Rocke, Norfolk, Va. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

D. R. Roesch, West Brighton, N. Y. 

Max Roesti, San Francisco, Cal. 

J. Bruce Rogers, Moorestown, N. I. 

A. B. Rohrbaugh, Chevy Chase, Md. 
Kappa Sigma 

Ivon D. Rohrer, Hagerstown, Md. 
W. W. Rollings, Jr., Pinewood, S. C. 
Jim V. Rose, Scranton, Pa. 
H. E. Rosenthal, Winston-Salem, N. C. 




Arthur B. Rouse, Jr., Erlanger, Ky. 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Elmer E. Rouzer, Hagerstown, Md. 
Kappa Sigma 

H. Russell, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Thomas S. Ryon, Washington, D. C. 
Kappa Alpha, Alpha Kappa Psi 

M. D. Sackman, Garden City, N. Y. 
Phi Kappa Psi 

Thomas C. Sager, Hagerstown, Md. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Frances Salmon, Manila, P. I. 
Alpha Phi 

Betty Jane Sauer, River Forest, 111. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Gertrude Sawilosky, Durham, N. C. 
Alpha Epsilon Phi 

Thomas B. Sawyer, Greensboro, N. C. 

R. L. Scanlon, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Phi Delta Theta 

146 



Sophomores 





Scarbrough, Schmidt, Schworer, Scott, D. Scott, Sewell, Shearin, Sheehan. 
Shields, Shilliday, Shilling, Shockloss, Sidbury, Simpson, Sisk, Sledge. 
Small, Smith, F. Smith, H. Smith, K. Smith, W. Smith, Somerville, Souders. 
Southgate, Span, Sparks, Spencer, Spurgeon, J. Spurgeon, Stack, Stallcup. 



M. M. Scarbrough, New Haven.Conn. W. J. Shockloss, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Martha K. Schmidt, Louisville, Ky. 
Pi Beta Phi 

Donald Schworer, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Aileen D. Scott, Norfolk, Va. 

Donald J. Scott, W. Palm Beach, Fla. 

Frances Sewell, Atlanta, Ga. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

C. D. Shearin, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

D. H. Sheehan, Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Eta Sigma 

Lois Shields, Lewes, Del. 

James G. Shilliday, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Edward W. Shilling, Dover, Del. 
Pi Kappa Phi 



Rowena Sidbury, Wilmington, N. C. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 

E. A. Simpson, Jr., Hightstown, N. J. 

Helen Sisk, Waynesville, N. C. 

Frances Sledge, Whiteville, N. C. 

Philip Small, Charlotte, N. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi 

Edward Smith, Dunn, N. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi 

Fred F. Smith, Orange, N. J. 
Delta Sigma Phi 

Harwood T. Smith, Petersburg, Va. 

Kenneth Smith, Barnesville, Ohio 



William G. Smith, Haverford, Pa. 

Sigma Chi 

W. B. Somerville, Cumberland, Md. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Betty Souders, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Kappa Delta 

Loula Southgate, Durham, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Samuel Span, Paterson, N. J. 

Ray Sparks, W. Palm Beach, Fla. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Hugo J. Spencer, Savannah, Ga. 

Allen C. Spurgeon, Uniontown, Pa. 

John L. Spurgeon, Uniontown, Pa. 

Warren C. Stack, Monroe, N. C. 

Marjorie Stallcup, St. Petersburg, Fla. 



147 




Sophomores 



Stamaton, Stamey, Starke, Stauffer, Steckel, Stedman, Steele, Stephens. 

R. Stephens, Stetler, Stine, Stocks, Stokes, Stone, R. Stone, Storie. 

Stowell, Strauss, Stutson, Sultner, Sundholm, Sutton, Sykes, Tantum. 

Taylor, F. Taylor, H. Taylor, S. Taylor, Thomas, Thompson, W. G. Thompson, Thornhill. 



Jack C. Stamaton, Stamford, Conn. 

Robert H. Stamey, Lawndale, N. C. 

Helen Starke, Ridgewood, N. J. 

C. C. Stauffer, Washington, D. C. 
Sigma Chi 

Wells S. Steckel, Freeport, N. Y. 

Ruth Stedman, Moncure, N. C. 

Anne L. Steele, Rockingham, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Hal C. Stephens, Morristown, Tenn. 

R. H. Stephens, Wilmington, Del. 
Sigma Chi 

Keith H. Stetler, York, Pa. 

Betty Stine, Wilmington, Del. 
Kappa Delta 



William L. Stocks, Jr., Altoona, Pa. 
Sigma Chi 

Elmer M. Stokes, Savannah, Ga. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Betty Wyllys Stone, Clarindon, Va. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Russell D. Stone, Wilmington, N. C. 

James C. Storie, Liberty, N. Y. 

Betty Ann Stowell, Foxchase, Pa. 

Phi Mu 

Carol Strauss, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Irene Stutson, Suffolk, Va. 
Alpha Epsilon Phi 

Isabel Sultner, York, Pa. 
Delta Delta Delta 

J. Edward Sundholm, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Kappa Sigma 




Wilton Carey Sutton, Jackson, Miss. 



H. A. Sykes, Jr., Queens Village, N. Y. 
Delta Tau Delta 

E. C. Tantum, Cream Ridge, N. J. 

Curtis S. Taylor, Addison, N. Y. 
Phi Eta Sigma 

Francis S. Taylor, Durham, N. C. 

Hoy Taylor, Jr., Milledgeville, Ga. 

Sherwood B. Taylor, Scranton, Pa. 

Charles A. Thomas, Jenkintown, Pa. 
Sigma Chi 

Walter R. Thompson, Marion, N. C. 

W. G. Thompson, Portland, Maine 

G. T. Thornhill, Bluefield, W. Va. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

148 



Sophomores 




Tice, Timberlake, T. Timberlake, Tolson, Towner, Townsend, Treut, Truax. 
Turnage, Turner, M. Turner, Turley, Ulrich, Van Camp, Van Lill, Vaughn. 
Von Glahn, Wade, Wagner, Walker, Wallace, Walter, Wannanaaker, Watson. 
E Watson, Waugh, Webster, Weidner, Weil, Weinstein, Wells, W. Wells. 



Mary Tice, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Phi Mu 

Lloyd F. Timberlake, Columbia, S. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi 

T. H. Timberlake, Columbia, S. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi 

G. A. Tolson, New Bern, N. C. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Robert C. Towner, Nunda, N. Y. 

R. Townsend, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Walter E. Treut, Rutherford, N. J. 
Delta Tau Delta 

O. W. Truax, Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Roy Turnage, II, Ayden, N. C. 

Charles F. Turner, Birmingham, Ala. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Eta 
Sigma 

Milford P. Turner, Clayton, N. J. 
Sigma Chi 

149 



E. W. Turley, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Harvey E. Ulrich, Haddenfield, N. I. 

Robert C. Van Camp, Scranton, Pa. 

S. J. Van Lill, III, Baltimore, Md. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Enoch S. Vaughn, Washington, N. C. 

H. D. Von Glahn, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Delta Phi Alpha 

Luther Irwin Wade, Elkin, N. C. 

Harold E. Wagner, Riverton, N. J. 

Remsen W. Walker, Tarrytown, N. Y. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Ann E. Wallace, Charlotte, N. C. 
Sigma Kappa 



George Walter, Washington, D. C. 
Phi Kappa Sigma 

Louise Wannamaker, Durham, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Ann Watson, Cheraw, S. C. 
Delta Delta Delta 

E. L. Watson, Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

Muriel Waugh, Maplewood, N. J. 

T. P. Webster, Jr., Tappahannock, Va. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Phi Eta Sigma 

John H. Weidner, Reading, Pa. 

Helen Marie Weil, Goldsboro, N. C. 
Alpha Epsilon Phi 

Maurice A. Weinstein, Salem, N. J. 

Simeon H. Wells, Raleigh, N. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi 

William W. Wells, Elmira, N. Y. 
Sigma Chi 




Sophomores 



West, Wherrett, Whitaker, White, J. White, M. White, Whiting, Widgery. 

Widmark, Wiley, A. Wiley, Williams, B. Williams, J. Williams, R. Williams, M. Williams. 

Willis, Winburn, Windsor, Winston, Wooldridge, Woolfolk, Worthington, Wright. 

M. Wright, Yoder, York, Young, J. Young, Zerbach, Ziegler, Zinn. 



James Kilgo West, Asheville, N. C. 
Delta Sigma Phi 

N. L. Wherrett, Wilmington, Del. 
Phi Kappa Psi 

Ruth L. Whitaker, Dravosburg, Pa. 

Donald White, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Joseph M. White, Portsmouth, Va. 
Sigma Chi 

Margaret White, Ridgewood, N. J. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Lois Whiting, Mt. Lakes, N. J. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Rhoda Widgery, Durham, N. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 

Walter L. Widmark, Verona, N. J. 

Arthur L. Wiley, Jr., Norfolk, Va. 

Avis Wiley, Sharon, Conn 



Berry C. Williams, Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Bill J. Williams, Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Joseph Lake Williams, Easley, S. C. 
Pi Kappa Phi 

Ralph F. Williams, Jr., Delmar, Del. 

Manley C. Williams, Rahway, N. J. 

Cecile Willis, Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Robert J. Winburn, Midville, Ga. 

Thomas B. Windsor, Cambridge, Md. 
Phi Kappa Psi 

Marjorie Winston, Roanoke, Va. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Lee Wooldridge, W. Hartford, Conn. 
Kappa Delta 



Beth Woolfolk, Lynchburg, Va. 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

G. S. Worthington, Washington, D.C. 
Delta Tau Delta 

Evelyn Wright, Delmar, Del. 

Margery Wright, Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Alpha Phi 

J. Russell Yoder, Jr., Esterly, Pa. 

Raymond E. York, Asheville, N. C. 

Hubert P. Young, Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Jeanne Young, Cleveland, Ohio 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Dorothy Zerbach, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Anne Ziegler, Farmer City, 111. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Ruth Zinn, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Alpha Epsilon Phi 

150 




FRESHMEN 




Freshmen 




Abarca. Abbott, Abele, Abernethy, Adams, P. Adams, Ade, Agar, Agnello, S. Agnello. 
Agostini, Alverson, Ameden, Applewhite, Arthur, Atkins, R. Atkins, W. Atkins, Aycock, Ayers 
Bailey, Baker, L. Baker, Baldwin, Ball, Ballenger, Bard, Bariscillo, Barkle, Barnes. 
J. Barnes, Barnhill, Barnum, Barrett, M. Barrett, Barry, Baskerville, R. Baskerville, Battle, 

Baugh. 
Baylor, N. Baylor, Beaman, Beatty, Bechara, Beckel, Becker, Bell. 

First Row: Enrique Abarca, Jr., Santurce, Puerto Rico; John Alfred Abbott, Birmingham, Ala.; Charles Henry 
Abele, Yorktown Heights, N. Y.; Beatrice Abernethy, Durham, N. C; Gwendolyn Adams, Martinsburg, W. Va.; 
Priscilla Adams, Jacksonville, Fla.; William Henry Ade, Jr., Chicago, 111.; John Curhs Agar, Black Mountain, N. C; 
Joseph A. Agnello, Knox, Pa.; Samuel Anthony Agnello, Jamestown, N. Y. 

Second Row: Emil Anthony Agostini, New York, N. Y.; Jesse M. Alverson, Jr., Harlan, Ky.; James Paul Amaden, 
East Hampton, N. Y.; Elizabeth Applewhite, Halifax, N. C.; Sara Arthur, Zanesville, Ohio; Lloyd Jackson Atkins, 
Gastonia, N. C; Robert Serls Atkins, Middleburg, N. C; Wade Winston Atkins, Jr., Greensboro, N. C; Benjamin 
Daniel Aycock, Goldsboro, N. C; Carlton Royse Ayers, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Third Row: Edgar Lee Bailey, Lexington, N. C; Ellis Thomson Baker, Baltimore, Md.; Louise Baker, Concord, 
N. H.; William Edwin Baldwin, Jr., Dunn, N. C; Elizabeth Ball, Maplewood, N. J.; Henry Grady Ballenger, Greenville, 
S. C; Donald Gibson Bard, Jr., Pleasantville, N. Y.; Virginia Bariscillo, Asbury Park, N. J.; John Egbert Barkle, Drexel 
Hill, Pa.; Dorothy Barnes, Charleston, W. Va. 

Fourth Row: Jack Carlisle Barnes, Greensboro, N. C; Lola Barnhill, Wilmington, Del.; John Pierpont Barnum, Jr. 
West Hartford, Conn.; John Lee Barrett, Gross Pointe, Mich.; Mary Dean Barrett, Stamford, Conn.; Frank Coates 
Barry, Sag Harbor, N. Y.; Dorothy Baskerville, Luthervilie, Md.; Robert Dortch Baskerville, Warrenton, N. C; Guy 
Arthur Battle, Sumpter, S. C; Robert Eberhart Baugh, Youngstown, Ohio. 

Fifth Row: Clifford Moses Baylor, Washington, N. J.; Norman Stanley Baylor, Washington, N. J.; John Robert 
Beaman, Morehead City, N. C; Hilton Arnold Beatty, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Jose Bechara, Jr., Mayaguez, I^uerto Rico; 
Willis Spangier Beckel, Huntington, Pa.; Doris Becker, Upper Darby, Pa.; George E. Bell, Jr., Rockville, Md. 



152 



Freshmen 




Bender, Bennett, M. Bennett, Berger, Bergman, Berini, Bessemer, Bew, Biddle, Birmingham. 
Bishop, J. Bishop, Blackley, Blair, Blake, Bobbitt, Boger, Booth, Bowen, Brandon. 
Braynard, Braznell, Breedlove, Briggs, Britton, Britz, Brogan, Brooks, R. Brooks, Brothers. 
Brown, K. Brown, M. Brown, T. Brown, Brugh, Bryan, Bunn, Burgess, Burhans, Burleson. 
Bushnell, Butler, W. Butler, Butt, Caddell, Cahill, Cairns, Campbell. 



First Row; William Andrew Bender, III, Upper Darby, Pa.; Helen Bennett, Clarksburg, W. Va.; Mary Bennett, 
Babson Park, Fla.; William Arthur Berger, Rahway, N. J.; Russell Bergman, Madison, N. J.; Joe Frank Berini, Durham, 
N. C; James Joseph Bessemer, Larchmont, N. Y.; David Fitzsimmons Bew, Margate City, N. C; Mary Duke Biddle, 
New York, N. Y.; G. G. Birmingham, Jr., Liberty, N. Y. 

Second Row: Hamilton Loomis Bishop, Garden City, N. Y.; John Livermore Bishop, Wrentham, Mass.; William 
Ormand Blackley, Durham, N. C; Barbara Blair, Monmouth, 111.; James Peter Blake, New Hartford, N. Y.; Mildred 
Bobbitt, Durham, N. C.; Freda Boger, Philadelphia, Pa.; John Merritt Booth, Pollocksville, N. C; James Darrel Bowen, 
Williamston, N. C; Minnie Brandon, Blackstone, Va. 

Third Row: Francis Osborn Braynard, Glen Cove, N. Y.; Jane Braznell, Miami Beach, Fla.; Caroline Breedlove, 
Durham, N. C.; Frances Briggs, Durham, N. C; John Bossard Britton, Sumpter, S. C; Matthew Leopold Britz, Winston- 
Salem, N. C; James Michael Brogan, Raleigh, N. C; Frances Brooks, Warsaw, N. C; Ray Brooks, Durham, N. C; 
Robert Carlton Brothers, Wilmington, N. C. 

Fourth Row: Betty Jean Brown, Blanchester, Ohio; Kathleen Maidee Brown, South Orange, N. J.; Morrison Ropes 
Brown, Swampscott, Mass.; Theron Hart Brown, III, Jackson Heights, N. J.; Louise Brugh, Montgomery, W. Va.; 
William Lyttle Bryan, Durham, N. C; Charles Ivy Bunn, Spring Hope, N. C; Lucille Burgess, Summit, N. J.'; James 
Lewis Burhans, Dunbar, Pa.; Norris Mervin Burleson, Port Allegany, Pa. 

Fifth Row: Edward Brooks Bushnell, Hartford, Conn.; Jack Floyd Butler, Canandaigua, N. Y.; Willis Butler, 
Shreveport, La.; Dorothy Butt, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Langdon Dowd Caddell, Hoffman, N. C.; John Andrew Cahill, 
Brookfield Center, Conn.; George Francis Cairns, Sunbury, Pa.; Carl Capper Campbell, Asheville, N. C. 



153 




Freshmen 




Campbell, Carpenter, R. Carpenter, Carter, Caskey, Cayce, Cendoya, Chambers, Chapman, Chason 
Chatham, Chestnut, Chickering, Chubb, Churchill, Clarke, R. Clarke, Clay, Clayton, Cloud. 
Cobb, Coleman, Constien, Cook, R. Cook, Cooke, Cooley, Coolidge, Coppedge, Coppersmith. 
Costigan, Courtwright, Cowlin, S. Cowlin, Cramer, Craven, Crawford, Cree, Creery, Crilly. 
Critcher, Crocker, Culp, Cure, Curtis, T. Curtis, Daane, Dadmun. 



First Row: Martha Campbell, Bradenton, Fla.; Albert J. Carpenter, Attleboro, Mass.; Ruth Carpenter, Garden 
Cify, N. Y.; Ciyton Cann Carter, Centreville, Md.; John Thomas Caskey, Washington, D. C; Edgard Evans Cayce, 
Virginia Beach, Va.; John Cendoya, Jr., Santiago, Cuba; William Frederick Chambers, Peekskill, N. Y.; John Walker 
Chapman, New Haven, Conn.; Virginia Chason, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Second Row: Alex Chatham, Jr., Elkin, N. C; Doris Chestnut, Durham, N. C; Charles Gordon Chickering, 
Wilmington, Del.; Kafherine Chubb, South Orange, N. J.; Howard William Churchill, Portland, Maine; Finley T. 
Qarlce, Jr., Morganton, N. C; Richard Norton Clarke, Montclair, N. J.; Mary Drew Clay, Macon, Ga.; Charles Manning 
Clayton, Harrisburg, Pa.; Dorothea Cloud, Kennett Square, Pa. 

Third Row: Irvin Wilson Cobb, Winston-Salem, N. C; Margaret Coleman, Kenosha, Wis.; Helen Constien, 
Ashland, Pa.; David S. T. Cook, Kenmore, N. Y.; Richard Warner Cook, Washington, N. J.; Benjamin Anderson 
Cooke, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Erma Cooley, Frenchtown, N. J.; Emily Coolidge, Greenfield, Mass.; Everette Peter Coppedge, 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio; Irma Coppersmith, Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Fourth Row: Carroll Costigan, Bloomington, 111.; Monroe Courtwright, Columbus, Ohio; K. S. Cowlin, Massillon, 
' iney Eugene Cowlin, Massillon, Ohio; Wellington Morley Cramer, Brooklyn, N. Y.; James B. Craven, Jr., 

I , N. C; Virginia Crawford, Flushing, N. Y.; John Franklin Cree, Sunbury, Pa.; Dorothy Creery, Drexel Hill, 

Pa.; Warren Lee Crilly Altoona, Pa. 

Fifth Row: Robert Francis Critcher, Buffalo, N. Y.; Martha Crocker, Tulsa, Okla.; Raymond Beatty Culp, Harris- 
i.urrj, Pa.; Arnold Grant Cure, Pine Hill, N. Y.; Evelyn Curtis, Cawthorne, N. J.; Thomas Alfred Curtis, Dalton, Pa.; 
Jam'-s Dewey Daane, Grand Rapids, Mich.; Roy Francis Dadmun, Baltimore, Md. 



154 



Freshmen 



MMHUFIMI* 





Danner, Darden, Davenport, J. Davenport, Davis, G. Davis, T. Davis, Dawson, Dean, DeHuff, 
Denny, Der Tatevasian, Deutsch, Dibeler, Dobbins, DoUard, Donnelly, R. A. Donnelly, 

Donovan, Down. 
Doyle, Drake, W. Drake, Duke, Duncan, Dunstan, Dusenburg, Duttenpofer, Dworsky, Eager, 
Earle, Eckersley, Edwards, Elder, Elmiger, Emery, Emory, Erion, Evans, Falciani. 
Farrell, Ferguson, Few, Findlay, Finefrock, Finger, Finn, Fischer. 



First Row: Edgar LeMoyne Danner, Larchmont, N. Y.; Harry McMillan Darden, Littleton, N. C; Clifton Albert 
Davenport, Victoria, Va.; John Purinton Davenport, Chevy Chase, Md.; Betsy Hale Davis, Baltimore, Md.; George 
Siward Davis, Durham, N. C; Thomas Edgar Davis, Rockingham, N. C; Archibald Nail Dawson, Lakewood, Ohio; 
James Robert Dean, Tazewell, Va.; Catherine DeHuff, Cynwyd, Pa. 

Second Row: Dan Denny, Harriman, Tenn.; R. A. Der Tatevasian, Braddock, Pa.; Muriel Deutsch, New York, 
N. Y.; Vernon Hamilton Dibeler, Roselle Park, N. J.; James Wilson Dobbins, Greenville, S. C; John Taff Dollard, 
Washington, D. C; Raymond William Donnelly, South Norwalk, Conn.; Richard Augustus Donnelly, Brielle, N. J.; 
Frederick Reynold Donovan, Newark, N. J.; Martha Down, Pleasant Ridge, Mich. 

Third Row: William Stowell Doyle, Lowell, Mich.; Elmer Frederick Drake, Roselle Park, N. J.; William Exall 
Drake, East Orange, N. J.; Robert Campbell Duke, Harrisonburg, Va.; Leroy Edward Duncan, Jr., Norfolk, Va.; 
Garland Harrington Dunstan, Elizabeth City, N. C; Jane Dusenburg, Miami, Fla.; Francis Sennett Duttenpofer, 
Cincinnati, Ohio; Bernard Ezra Dworsky, Durham, N. C; Howard Eager, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Fourth Row: Elizabeth Earle, Hermansville, Mich.; Floyd Roland Eckersley, Scranton, Pa.; Clyde Edwards, 
Durham, N. C; Guy Hampton Elder, Jr., Charlotte, N. C; Marguerite Elmiger, Bayonne, N. J.; Elizabeth Emery, 
Sanford, Maine; Earl LeRoy Emory, Jr., Chocowinity, N. C; Mary Elizabeth Erion, Orchard, N. Y.; Grace Evans, 
Windber, Pa.; Romeo Alfred Falciani, Hammonton, N. J. 

Fifth Row: John Cahill Farrell, Norwich, N. Y.; Denzil Morton Ferguson, Terre Haute, Ind.; Kendrick Sheffield Few 
Durham, N. C; Robert Blackman Findlay, Woodcliffe, N. J.; Charles Raymond Finefrock, Massilon, Ohio; Margaret 
Finger, Maiden, N. C; Walter Finn, Palmyra, N. Y.; Adolphe Gordon Fischer, Baltimore, Md. 



155 




Freshmen 




Fisher, R. Fisher, Fitzgerald, Fleet, Fleetwood, Fliflet, Floyd, Fogarty, Fogg, Foote. 
Foreman, Forlines, Forsberg, Fox, Franck, Franson, Fraser, L. Fraser, Freidlin, French, 
Friedman, Fuller, Fuller, Furlong, Gager, Gaines, Gallo, Gannsby, Gardt, Garlock. 
Garver, Gatewood, Gattis, Gaudreau, Gayle, Gerard, Gibbs, Gibson, L. Gibson, Gillin. 
Gingland, Gisriel, Glaser, Glasson, Goehrig, Goldstein, Goodale, Goode. 



First Row: Dorothy Fisher, Drexel Hill, Pa.; Robert S. Fisher, South Orange, N. J.; James Morgan Fitzgerald, 
Wilson, N. C; Gertrude Fleet, Winter Haven, Fla.; John Kenneth Fleetwood, Seaford, Del.; Arne Thorlief Fliflet, 
Mountain Lakes, N. J.; Hal Stanfield Floyd, Fairmont, N. C; Daniel Brown Fogarty, Jacksonville, Fla.; Charles Watson 
Fogg, Bethlehem, Pa.; Theodore Foote, Orange, N. J. 

Second Row: William Woodley Foreman, Elizabeth City, N. C; John Arthur Forlines, Durham, N. C; Raynor 
Morgan Forsberg, Pittsburg, Pa.; William Maxie Fox, Roxboro, N. C; William Franck, Durham, N. C; Eric Carl 
Franson, Hackensack, N. J.; Ethel Jean Fraser, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Louise Fraser, Fort Bragg, N. C.; Julius Freidlin, 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Charles Ferris French, Mountain Lakes, N. J. 

Third Row: Charlotte Friedman, Asheville, N. C; Elizabeth Fuller, Arlington, Va.; Robert House Fuller, Rochester, 
N. Y ; lohn Hamilton Furlong, Chester, Pa.; Rachel Clark Gager, Yantie, Conn.; Jay Haydon Gaines, Evanston, III.; 
'" ' 'in Gallo, Vineland, N. J.; John Woodruff Gamsby, New Haven, Conn.; Wylie Gardt, Bradford, Mass.; 

je Garlock, Lockport, N. Y. 

Fourth Row: Margaret Garver, Iveyland, Pa.; Robert Charles Gatewood, Mt. Sterling, Ky.; Walter Robert Gattis, 
Durham, N. C; Gerard Lawrence Gaudreau, Westbrook, Maine; Miles Alderman Gayle, High Point, N. C; Frank 
Hiaht Gerard, Upper Darby, Pa.; Gibbs Crabtree Gibbs, Mt. Airy, N. C; Jeptha Nelson Gibson, Jr., Gibson, N. C; 
Lillian Gibson, Elizabt'th, N. J.; Hazelle Gillin, Bangor, Maine. 

Fifth Row: Richard Parsons Gingland, Hackettstown, Pa.; Harper Gisriel, Baltimore, Md.; Audrey Glaser, 
West Colllngswood, N, J.; John Glasson, Durham, N. C; John Appleget Goehrig, Trenton, N, J.; Joseph Goldstein, 
.SmI.tii N I H.l.r, Ov.lole, Jacksonville, Fla.; Richard William Goode, Newton, Mass. 



156 



Freshmen 





W7^*M 



Gore, Goree, Gorton, Graebner, Graham, Grahl, Gregson, Griffin, Grimm, Groesbeck. 
Groupe, Groves, Haas, Hammond, Hancock, Hanig, Hanshaw, Hardin, Haring, Harris. 
H. Harris, Harrison, Hartlieb, Harvey, Haskell, Hatch, Hatcher, Hauser, Hawkins, Hayes. 
Henry, Herman, Hibberd, Hiergesell, Hill, Hinshaw, Hitch, Hobbs, Hobgood, Hoggan. 
Holland, Holmes, Horack, Horn, Home, Horsting, Howard, J. Howard. 



First Row: Henry Grady Gore, Jr., Washington, D. C.; Mary Goree, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Jeanne Gorton, Great 
Neck, N. Y.; Paul Decker Graebner, Lakewood, Ohio; Pauhne Graham, Hampden, Highland, Maine; James Samuel 
Grahl, Americus, Ga.; Jack Roger Gregson, Morristown, N. J.; Gerald Laurens Griffin, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Thomas 
Robert Grimm, Jr., South Orange, N. J.; William Francis Groesbeck, Ilion, N. Y. 

Second Row: Vincent Groupe, Philadelphia, Pa.; Carolyn Groves, Red Hook, N. Y.; Robert Otto Haas, New 
York, N. Y.; Homer Humphrey Hammond, Garden City, N. Y.; Albert Delos Hancock, Port Washington, N. Y.; 
William Fred Hanig, Elmhurst, N. Y.; Frank Wayne Hanshaw, Scarsdale, N. Y.; Hilliard Hardin, Clover, S. C; 
T. Alton Haring, Hackensack, N. J.; Douglas Leroy Harris, Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Third Row: Herschel William Harris, Douglas, Ga.; Doris Harrison, Crosswicks, N. J.; Robert Louis Hartlieb, 
Wantagh, N. Y.; Jack Wendell Harvey, Oak Hill, W. Va.; Ruth Haskell, Washington, D. C; John Palmer Hatch, 
White Plains, N. Y.; Elizabeth Hatcher, High Point, N. C; Edward Michael Hauser, Glenside, Pa.; Jane Hawkins, 
Marietta, Ga.; Kiffin Rockwell Hayes, Charlotte, N. C. 

Fourth Row: Dorothy Henry, Atlanta, Ga.; Samuel Herman, Savannah, Ga.; Chris Hibberd, Durham, N. C; 
Richard Mason Hiergesell, Roselle Park, N. J.; Dan Winheld Hill, Asheville, N. C; Esther Hinshaw, Winston-Salem, 
N. C; Robert Arthur Hitch, Jacksonville, Fla.; Frederick Thomas Hobbs, Wilmington, N. C; Arthur Alton Hobgood, 
Durham, N. C; Laurence Edward Hoggan, New Haven, Conn. 

Fifth Row: Sherrill Reid Holland, Jr., Statesville, N. C; Reid Thomas Holmes, Wildwood, N. J.; Benjamin 
Shambaugh Horack, Durham, N. C; Margaret Horn, Cleveland, N. C; Stephen Francis Home, Farmington, N. C; 
Jane Horsting, Willmette, 111.; Constance Howard, Forest Hills, N. Y.; John Couper Howard, Savannah, Ga. 



157 




Freshmen 



Howe, Howell, Hoyle, Huck, Hudson, Hulme, Hutchinson, Hyde, Ingham, Inglis. 

Ingram, Irwin. Jackson, C. Jackson, S. Jackson, Jannes, R. J. James, W. James, Jancsics, Jessup. 

John. Johnson, E. Johnson, W. Johnson, Jones, H. Jones, J. Jones, P. Jones, Jordan, Kahle. 

Kaplan, Kasik, Keister, Kelley. Kennedy, Kerr, Kidd, Kilduff, King, Klemm. 

Klepp. Koehnlein, Koerner, Kohler, Koonce, Koop, Kouwenhoven, Kreiser. 

First Row: Elliot Harroun Howe, Fulton, N. Y.; Jean Howell, Atlanta, Ga.; David Wade Hoyle, Durham, N. C; 
William Richard Huck, Bloomfield, N. J.; W. Hill Hudson, Jr., Shelby, N. C; William S. N. Hulme, Jackson Heights, 
N. Y.; John Grosvernor Hutchinson, Ballston, Va.; Lorraine Hyde, Interlaken, N. J.; Alfred Walker Ingham, New 
York N. Y.: DJward Svlvester Inglis, Great Neck, N. Y. 

o<'cun(j kuw. junii Edgar Ingram, Lewes, Del.; William Madison Irwin, Sunbury, Pa.; Cecil Banon Jackson, 
Durham, N. C; Clarinda Jackson, St. Augustine, Fla.; Stevens Pell Jackson, Larchmont, N. Y.; Robert Lewis James, 
' rg, Va.; Robert Johnson James, Bedford, Va.; Walter Delos James, Washington, D. C; Mathew Joseph 
Newark, N. J.; Julian Clyde Jessup, Hertford, N. C. 

Third Row: Helena John, Uniontown, Pa.; Edward Harold Johnson, Jr., Orlando, Fla.; Eloise Johnson, Glenburnie, 
Md.; Walter Christopher Johnson, Jr., Chattanooga, Tenn.; Curtis Scott Jones, Greenlawn, N. Y.; Horace Ellis Jones, 
Spring City, Pa.; James Elwood Jones, Jr., High Point, N. C; Paul Kingsbury Jones, Salem, Mass.; Macon Jordan, 
Mt. Airy, N. C; John Roscoe Kahle, Columbus, Ohio. 

Fourth Row: Lillian Kaplan, Mt. Gilead, N. C; Charles Kasik, Jr., Milwaukee, Wis.; Robert Stanley Keister, 
rg, W. Va.; Jane Kelley, Atlanta, Ga.; Robert Freeman Kennedy, Montclair, N. J.; Walter James Kerr, 
. N. J.; Stephen Kidd, Penns Grove, N. J.; Barbara Kilduff, Waterbury, Conn.; Dwight Bradley King, Waterbury, 
Conn.; Betty Klemm, Bloomington, III. 



Fifth Row: Alfred Klepp, Arlington, N. J.; Betty Koehnlein, Kenmore, N. Y.; John Maxwell Koerner, East Paterson, 
N. I.; S\f ■•' ' ■ "I. C; James Leonard Koonce, High Point, N. C; Chester Sedgewick Koop, Islip, N. Y.; 

Jean Kc- . , N. Y.; C. Frederick Kreiser, Lebanon, Pa. 



158 



Freshmen 




Krummel, Lacock, Laing, Lambert, Lambeth, Landreth, Laning, Lanning, Laprade, Lavenstein 
Lavinder, Laws, Leckie, Lee, LeGwin, Lemonier, Lentz, Leon, Levinson, Levitt. 
Levy, Lewis, Liipfert, Lindhjem, Littler, Liverant, Livingston, Logan, Lohnrian, Long. 
Longworth, Lose, Love, Lovell, K. Lovell, P. Lovell, Lowe, Lowenstein, Lutz, Lynch. 
Lyons, Lyttle, MacClements, MacLeod, D. MacLeod, MacMullen, McDaniel, McGimsey. 



First Row: Mary Eleanor Krummel, Durham, N. C; John Griffith Lacock, Washington, Pa.; lames McAlpin 
Laing, II, Lewisburg, W. Va.; Ralph Colin Lambert, Columbia, S. C; Ralph MacAuley Lambeth, Thomasville, N. C; 
Charles Elmer Landreth, Winston-Salem, N. C; Eugene LaRue Laning, Jr., Bridgeton, N. J.; Donald Day Lanning, 
West Trenton, N. ].; Nancy Laprade, Durham, N. C; Esther Lavenstein, Petersburg, Va. 

Second Row: Thomas Curtiss Lavinder, Abingdon, Va.; Virginia Laws, Moravian Falls, N. C; James Alexander 
Leckie, New York, N. Y.; Francis Brown Lee, Monroe, N. C; John Bunyan LeGwin, Rockingham, N. C; Charles John 
Lemonier, Weehawken, N. J.; John Luther Lentz, Durham, N. C; Virginia Leon, Westfield, N. J.; Joseph Herman 
Levinson, Benson, N. C; Helen Levitt, Petersburg, Va. 

Third Row: Leonard Daniel Levy, Durham, N. C; Richard Quarles Lewis, Annapolis, Md.; William Joseph 
Liipfert, Fort Valley, Ga.; Carolyn Lindhjem, Mt. Vernon, N. Y.; James William Littler, Manlius, N. Y.; Freda Liverant, 
York, Pa.; Ruth Livingston, Philadelphia, Pa.; John Charles Logan, Kenmore, N. Y.; Robert Lohman, Birmingham, 
Ala.; Max Bickford Long, Roxboro, N. C. 

Fourth Row: Jean Longworth, Copperhill, Tenn.; Robert Norman Lose, Philadelphia, Pa.; Bobbie Jean Love, 
Nashville, N. C; Ernest James Lovell, Jr., Raleigh, N. C; Kenneth D. Lovell, Florence, Ala.; Paul Abbott Lovell, 
Quincy, Mass.; Harold Thomas Lowe, Rutherford, N. J.; Herbert Roof Lowenstein, Irvington, N. J.; Elizabeth Lutz, 
Ridgewood, N. J.; John Cooper Lynch, Jr., Stockbridge, Mass. 

Fifth Row: Wilbur Allan Lyons, Ridgewood, N. J.; John Logan Lyttle, New York, N. Y.; Mary Helen MacClements, 
Charlotte, N. C; Betsy MacLeod, Buffalo, N. Y.; Duncan Kennedy MacLeod, Buffalo, N. Y.; Miriam MacMullen, 
Maplewood, N. J.; William Kirkwood McDaniel, Scarsdale, N. Y.; lames Franks McGimsey, Morganton, N. C. 



159 




Freshmen 




McGinnis. Mclnnis, McKee, McLain, McLaughlin, McMackin, McMillin, Mack, Maddox, McGraw. 
Manbeck. Manville, Margolis, Markham, Marks, Marlatt, Marlowe, Marshall, B. Marshall, 

G. Marshall. 
Martin, S. Martin, Martz. Marx, Mason, W. Mason, Massie, Matheson, Mauser, Maxwell. 
Meldrun, Mellen, Merchant, Mewborn, Miles, R. Miles, Miller, D. W. Miller, G. Miller, R. Miller. 
W. Miller, Milliette, Millner, Minor, Mitchell, H. Mitchell, Mize, Mizell. 

First Row: Madeline McGinnis, Montclair, N. J.; Alex Nott Mclnnis, Gult Hammock, Fla.; James Elder McKee, 
Morristown, Pa.; William Campbell McLain, Columbia, S. C; Byron Howard McLaughlin, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Frank 
Joseph McMackin, Jersey City, N. J.; Elbert Raymond McMillin, Fayetteville, Tenn.; Harold Dwight Mack, Jr., Haw- 
thorne, N. Y.; Robert Earle Maddox, Greensboro, N. C; Mary McGraw, Carlsbad, N. M. 

Second Row: John Norman Manbeck, Lewistown, Pa.; Ruth Manville, Tryon, N. C; Kathryn Margolis, Passaic, 
N. J.; Frank Turner Markham, Tiptonville, Tenn.; Geneva Marks, Saniord, N. C; Mary Marlatt, Larchmont, N. Y.; 
lames Robert Marlowe, Thomasville, N. C; Archibald George Marshall, New Haven, Conn.; Betty Marshall, Hender- 
:^nville, N. C; George Fox Marshall, Durham, N. C. 

Third Row: Catherine Martin, Rochester, N. Y.; Sidney Coke Martin, Washington, D. C; Edward E. Martz, 
Pine Grove Mills, Pa.; Gloria Marx, River Edge, N. J.; Howard Patrick Mason, Hollywood, Cal.; Walter Harrison 
Mason, New York, N. Y.; Ottis Howard Massie, East Waynesville, N. C; Emily Matheson, Atlanta, Ga.; Frances 
Mauser, Catasauqua, Pa.; Jean Maxwell, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Fourth Row: George Boysen Meldrun, Langhorne, Pa.; James Demetrios Mellen, Everett, Mass.; Robert Eugene 
M ■ ' .t, Wilkinsburg, Pa.; Grace Mewborn, Snow Hill, N. C.; Charles N. Miles, Seymour, Conn.; Robert Irving Miles, 
, Pa.; Dorothy Miller, Wilmington, N. C; Dudley Webb Miller, Jr., White Plains, N. Y.; Garlield Lankard 
Milicr, Coral Gables, Fla.; Reed C. Miller, Brookline, Mass. 



Fifth Row: William Ellsworth Miller, Jr., 
Rochelle, N. Y.; John Travis Minor, Batavia, N. 
inglon, N. C; Willie Lee Mize, Durham, N. C; 



Sunbury, Pa.; Jeanne Milliette, Drexel Hill, Pa.; lone Millner, New 
Y.; Phil Mitchell, II, Rock Island, 111.; Henry Reid Mitchell, Jr., Wash- 
Louise Mizell, Opp, Ala. 



160 



Freshmen 




Mooney, Moore, H. Moore, Moorhead, Moreton, Morgan, Morrison, Morrow, Morton, Murfree 

Murphy', Murray, Myers, Nath, Neikirk, Nelson, Newber, Nichols, Nixon, Nugent. 

Oak Oliver, Olson, W. Olson, O'Mara, O'Neil, Ord, Ordway, Osburn, Orton. 

Oviatt, Pack, Part, Parker, R. Parker, Parsons, Paschall, Patterson, M. Patterson, Pawling. 

Payne,' Pedeflous, Peebles, Peffer, Pennell, Perdue, Perrell, Perry. 



First Row Thomas Harrison Mooney, Philadelphia, Pa.; George Sorrell Moore, Charlotte, R C; Hervey Studdi- 
ford Moore Jr Sea Girt, N. J.; Charles Albert Moorhead, Sunbury, Pa.; Jeannette Moreton, Erie, Pa^; Clinton \A/ilkins 
Morgan, Lombard, 111.; Virginia Morrison, Rockingham, N. C; George Samuel Morrow, Jr., Scarsdale, N. Y.; 
Eugene Laughlin Morton, Lakewood, Ohio; Matthias Brickell Murfree, Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Second Row: John Irwin Murphy, Scottsdale, Pa.; James Murray, Jr., Port Washington, N. Y., John Pohly Myers, 
New York N Y • Lawrence Haig Nath, Middletown, N. Y.; William Irvin Neikirk, Hagerstown, Md.; Helen Nelson, 
Loganport Md.;'john Frederick Newber, Wilmington, N. C; Arthur Dewey Nichols, Jr., North Abington, Mass.; 
Claiborne Merrell Nixon, Elizabeth City, N. C; Allen Edward Nugent, New Haven, Conn. 

Third Row: Eleanor Oak, Bound Brook, N. I.; Ann Oliver, Westfield, N. J.; Harlan Haworth Olson, Le Grange, 
111 • Wallace Bruce Olson, Plainfield, N. J.; Robert James O'Mara, Ashland, Ky.; John Raymond O Neil Haverhill, 
Mass.; Jean Ord, McKeesport, Pa.; Arthur Dana Ordway, Douglastown, N. Y.; Mary Kathryn Osburn, Dubois, Fa.; 
James Richard Orton, Lewes, Del. 

Fourth Row Arthur Oviatt, West Haven, Conn.; Harrell Pack, Winston-Salem, N. C; Marion Part, Leland, Miss.; 
Eunice Parker, Goldsboro, N. C; Richard Parker, El Paso, Texas; John Robert Parsons Jr., Murfreesboro, Tenn.; 
Taylor Hill Paschall, Durham, N. C; Edward Verno Patterson, Spring Lake, N. Y.; Mildred Patterson, Durham, N. C; 
Arthur Pawling, Westfield, N. J. 

Fifth Row John Howard Payne, Jr., Washington, D. C; Marie-Louise Pedeflous, Watchung, N. J.; Emilia Peebles, 
Chevy Chase, Md.; George Whitesell Peffer, Jr., Youngstown, Ohio; Elizabeth Pennell, Fort Bragg, N. C; Maxine 
Perdue, Canton, Ohio; Francis Arthur Perrell, Miami, Fla.; John Silver Perry, Rocky Mount, N. C. 



161 




Freshmen 




Peters. P. Peters, W. Peters, Petrey, Pharo, Phillips, S. Phillips, Pifer, Foerner, Porterfield. 
Powell, J. Powell, Powers, Pray, Price, Preyer, Proctor, Prosser, Puckett, R. Puckett. 
Pugliese, Putnam, Quinn, Radtke, Rague, Ramsey, M. Ramsey, Rand, Rathbun, Rawdon. 
Ray, Reed, S. Reed, Rees, Reese, J. Reese, Reisner, Rescorla, Rettew, Reiger. 
Rhodes, Richardson, Riggs, Riley, Robbins, Robertson, S. K. Robertson, Roe. 



First Row: Margaret Peters, Jacksonville, Fla.; Paul Robert Peters, Lehighton, Pa.; William Anthony Peters 
Elizabeth City, N. C; Donald Sanford Petrey, Alexander City, Ala.; George MacPherson Pharo, Moorestown, N. J. 
Herbert Graham Phillips, Charlotte, N. C; Susan Phillips, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Lewis Weaver Pifer, Durham, N. C. 
Edward Russell Poerner, East Orange, N. J.; Frances Porterfield, Durham, N. C. 

Second Row: Dorothy Powell, Detroit, Mich.; Joe Reade Powell, Durham, N. C; William James Powers, Scranton, 
Pa.; Harold Erwin Pray, Oak Park, 111.; Claire Price, Durham, N. C; Al Ohem Preyer, Cleveland Heights, Ohio; 
Sarah Jane Proctor, Durham, N. C.; Josephine Prosser, St. Michael, Pa.; Nell Puckett, Charlotte, N. C; Robert 
Stephens Puckett, Kenmore, N. Y. 

Third Row: Nola Pugliese, Philadelphia, Pa.; Ann Putnam, Washington, N. C; Jesse Melvyn Quinn, Pittsburgh, 
Pa.; Robert August Radtke, Detroit, Mich.; John Raymond Rague, Queens Village, N. Y.; Charles S. W. Ramsey, 
Charlotte, N. C; Mary Lee Ramsey, Durham, N. C; Robert Collom Rand, Lombard, 111.; James Potter Rathbun, 
Fredonia, N. Y.; Janet Rawdon, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Fourth Row: George Irving Ray, Jr., Charlotte, N. C; Jack Calvin Reed, Greensboro, N. C; Sam Hantz Reed, 
Charlotte, N. C; Hal Collins Rees, Fayetteville, Tenn.; Charles Clifford Reese, Wilmington, Del.; Justin Reese, Newark, 
N. J.; William Harry Reisner, Hagerstown, Md.; Betty Rescorla, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; Janet Rettew, Harrisburg, Pa.; 
Vivian Reiger, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Fifth Row: William Luther Rhodes, Estill, S. C; Richard Kenneth Richardson, Durham, N. C; Thomas Jeffries 
Rlggs, Huntington, W. Va.; William Joseph Riley, Jr., HoUis, N. Y.; Martin Albert Robbins, Lakewood, N. I.; Sam 
Robertson, Clayton, N. C; Sally Keith Robertson, South Norwark, Conn.; Jane Roe, Moundsville, W. Va. 



162 



Freshmen 





Rogers, Rogerson, Rohrbach, Rosch, Ross, R. Ross, Rowley, Ruark, Rucker, Rue. 
Rumsey, Ruskin, Russell, Rynd, Saleeby, Samuels, Sandidge, Schaefer, Schendorf, Schoenberge: 
Schuck, Scott, R. Scott, Seaman, Seeberg, Semmel, Senff, Sewall, Sexton, Shackelford. 
Shackleton, Shannon, Shapiro, Shepard, Sherron, Shoemaker, Shortlidge, Shuff, Shuford, Silvei 
Silvernail, Simmons, R. Simmons, Singletary, Sink, Slaner, Slatkin, Slay. 



First Row: James Forbes Rogers, Upper Montclair, N. J.; Walter Bryant Rogerson, Petersburg, Va.; John Deer 
Rohrbach, Sunbury, Pa.; Beatrice Rosch, White Plains, N. Y.; Carleton Playfair Ross, Kenilworth, 111.; Robert Enright 
Ross, Baltimore, Md.; Kenneth Johnson Rowley, Hamden, Conn.; Frances Ruark, Park Ridge, 111.; Alfred Morgan 
Rucker, Petersburg, Va.; Willard Hubert Rue, Imlaystown, N. J. 

Second Row: Herman Rumsey, Atlanta, Ga.; Alvin Richard Ruskin, New Rochelle, N. Y.; Woodard Fleming 
Russell, Durham, N. C; Laurence Rynd, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Helen Saleeby, Monroe, N. C; Irving Leonard Samuels, 
Baltimore, Md.; William Leete Sandidge, Lynchburg, Va.; Martha Schaefer, Nutley, N. J.; Hilliard Arthur Schendorf, 
Rahway, N. J.; Ruth Schoenberger, Lawrenceville, N. J. 

Third Row: Mary Schuck, Coconut Grove, Fla.; LeRoy Alexander Scott, Kannapolis, N. C; Ruth Scott, Waynes- 
burg, Va.; Allen Lang Seaman, Madison, Conn.; Gordon Allan Seeberg, Ansonia, Conn.; Myron Semmel, New York, 
N. Y.; Tom Prewitt Senff, Mt. Sterling, Ky.; Elizabeth Sewall, York Village, Maine; Edna Earle Sexton, Zebulon, N. C.; 
Daniel Owen Shackelford, Durham, N. C. 

Fourth Row: John Henry Shackleton, Jr., Springfield, Pa.; Charles Eugene Shannon, Monroe, N. C; David 
Joseph Shapiro, New York, N. Y.; Vitol Shepard, Palm Beach, Fla.; Roger Jackson Sherron, Jr., Durham, N. C; William 
Barton Shoemaker, Natrona Heights, Pa.; Elizabeth Shortlidge, Lincoln University, Pa.; Landon Earle Shuff, Greenville, 
N. C; Betty Shuford, Conover, N. C; Louis Wilson Silver, Durham, N. C. 

Fifth Row: Charles Roy Silvernail, Dalton, Mass.; Clarence Frederick Simmons, Jr., New York, N. Y.; Ruth Simmons, 
Wilmington, Del.; William Edward Singletary, Winston-Salem, N. C; Henry Harrison Sink, Greensboro, N. C; 
Alfred Philip Slaner, Hobart, Okla.; Robert Edward Slatkin, Weehawkin, N. J.; Ronald Joseph Slay, Greenville, N. C. 



163 




Freshmen 



Sloan, R. Sloan, Smith, E. L. Smith, E. Smith, H. Smith, M. Smith, P. Smith, V. Smith, Smither 
Snider. Snyder. R. Snyder, Somnners, Southworth, Spangler, Spies, Spruill, Staley, Stannets. 
Stankowitch, Stearns, Stecher, Steele, Stewart, Stickell, Stine, Stokke, Stone, G. Stone. 
Storb, Stovall, Strayer, Strickland, R. Strickland, Stringer, Struble, Stubbs. 
Stull, Sullivan, Surles, Swindell, Szepesi, Tabor, Taylor, G. Taylor. 




First Row: Harvey Fronfield Sloan, Bellevue, Pa.; Robert Love Sloan, Waynesville, N. C; Charles Edv\?ard 
Smith, Palmyra, N. Y.; Edward Lewis Smith, Whiteville, N. C; Ellen Smith, York, Pa.; Helen Baxter Smith, Virginia 
Beach, Va.; Maryln Smith, Shelby, N. C; Pauline Smith, Philipsburg, N. J.; Virginia Smith, Baldwin, N. Y.; Lucy 
SpTtV"^r Winston-Salem, N. C. 

^second Row: Jean Snider, Meyersdale, Pa.; LaTour Snyder, Leighton, Pa.; Richard John Snyder, Palmerton, Pa.; 
Paul Adams Sommers, Maplewood, N. J.; June Southworth, Edgewater, Md.; Robert Frank Spangler, Newport News, 
Va.; Charles Webb Spies, Boyviile, N. Y.; Sara Spruill, Goldsboro, N. C; Edwin Lewis Staley, Harrisburg, Pa.; Grace 
Stamefs, Avalon, Pa. 

Third Row: William Adelbert Stankowitch, Ridgefield Park, N. J.; James Coleman Stearns, Jacksonville, Fla.; 
Clark Kipp Stecher, Weehawken, N. J.; Orlando Lester Steele, Lakewood, Ohio; Winburn Earle Stewart, Jr., Macon, 
Ga.; Clarence Middlekauff Stickell, Hagerstown, Md.; Doris Stine, Hagerstown, Md.; Robert Bergan Stokke, Freeport, 
N. Y.; Dorothy Stone, Biddeford, Maine; George Henry Stone, Worcester, Mass. 

Fourth Row: Mary Storb, New Holland, Pa.; Sidney Stovall, Virgilina, Va.; Edwin Milton Strayer, York, Pa.; 
James Millard Strickland, Rocky Mount, N. C; Roscoe Lee Strickland, Jr., Maplewood, N. J.; Henry Jerome Stringer, Jr., 
Baltimore, Md.; Albert Struble, Westfield, N. J.; Dan Hamer Stubbs, Jr., Lenoir, N. C. 



Fifth Row: Ri • ■ • '-n Stull, Washington, Pa.; Harry Brownell Sullivan, St. Albans, N. Y.; 
Rocky Mount, N. ,nd Slade Swindell, Jr., Durham, N. C; Jean Szepesi, Scarsdale, N. 

Boessevain, Va.; Dorothy Taylor, Wilmington, Del.; George Evans Taylor, Huntington, W. Va. 



Hugh Sexton Surles, 
Y.; Countess Tabor, 



164 



Freshmen 





Tepper, Terry, Thomas, J. Thomas, J. H. Thomas, Thompson, C. Thompson, K. Thompson, 

Thoms, Tipton. 
Titus, Townson, Tracy, Tripp, Truesdale, Turner, W. Turner, Utley, Vantine, Van Voorhis. 
Vaughan, Veirs, Vincent, Waits, Walker, R. Walker, Wallace, J. Wallace, Jean Wallace, Ware 
R. Ward, Warth, Washburn, Watson, Webb, N. Webb, Weber, Webster. 
Weichel, Weischer, Weingarten, Weller, Wellman, Wenzel, Whedbee, Whiddon. 



First Row: Ruth Tepper, Baltimore, Md.; Emerson Woodworth Terry, Montclair, N. J.; James C. Thomas, 
Durham, N. C; James Bartholow Thomas, Frederick, Md.; John H. P. Thomas, Huntington, W. Va.; Betty Lou Thompson, 
Gastonia, N. C; Claire Thompson, Miami Beach, Fla.; Kearns Reid Thompson, Jr., Reidsville, N. C; Joan Thoms, 
Hawthorne, N. J.; Eric Gordon Tipton, Petersburg, Va. 

Second Row; Aileen Titus, Washington, D. C; Quenhn Townson, Murphy, N. C; William Edward Tracy, 
Stockbridge, Mass.; Francis Harvey Tripp, Jr., Moorestown, N. J.; Sidney Louis Truesdale, Asheboro, N. C; Stanley 
John Turner, Upper Montclair, N. J.; William Joseph Turner, Whitehall, Va.; Frances Utley, Lynchburg, Va.; Ora Jean 
Vantine, Great Falls, S. C.; Robert Henry Van Voorhis, Rutherford, N. J. 

Third Row: James Robert Vaughan, East Aurora, N. Y.; Charles Clifton Veirs, Jr., Rockville, Md.; Orville Holt 
Vincent, Oak Park, 111.; Sara Waits, Andalusia, Ala.; James Bradley Walker, New Rochelle, N. Y.; Richard Cuthbert 
Walker,' Moorestown, N. J.; Arthur Wallace, Elizabeth, N. J.; James Mathews Wallace, Moorestown, N. J.; Jean Wallace, 
Newark, N. J.; Robert Bruce Ward, Baltimore, Md. 

Fourth Row: Robert Stuart Ward, Roselle, N. J.; Henry Kent Warth, Baltimore, Md.; Benjamin Washburn, 
Durham, N. C; Jack Lawrence Watson, Charlotte, N. C; Jeannette Webb, Ridgewood, N. J.; Nancy Webb, Greenwich, 
Conn.; John Joseph Weber, Newark, N. J.; Christopher Rowland Webster, Tappahannock, Va. 

Fifth Row: Robert Ludwig Weichel, Scranton, Pa.; Virginia Weischer, Montrose, N. Y.; Bernard Weirigarten, 
Brooklyn N Y.- Mary Elizabeth Weller, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Henry Marvin Wellman, Jr., Morganton, N. C; Herman 
Godfrey Wenzel, Jr., Rockville Centre, N. Y.; James Carson Whedbee, Jr., Rowland, N. C; Clyde Lee Whiddon, 
Ft. Pierce, Fla. 



165 




Freshmen 




Whitaker, H. Whitaker, White, L. White, Whitley, Whitted, Whitten, Wichum, Wilby, Will. 
Williams, M. Williams, W. Williams, Williamson, Wilkins, Willis, Wilmot, Wilson, H. Wilson 

H. M. Wilson. 
M. Wilson, Winston, Winters, Winterson, Withers, Wolford, Womble, Wood, Woodard, Woodbridge 
Wooddy, Woods, Workman, Wright, J. Wright, M. Wright, Wriston, Wulfers. 
Wyche, Wyman, Yearns, Yoder, Yorke, Younts, Zecher, Zuckerman. 



First Row: Elizabeth Whitaker, Indianapolis, Ind.; Howard Whitaker, Jr., Windsor, Conn.; Evelyn White, 
Bradeiiton, Fia.; Leon Sammuei White, Peterborough, N. H.; Woodrow Lacy Whitley, Wendell, N. C; Hugh Edwin 
Whitted, Jr., Durham, N. C; Edwin Emery Whitten, South Portland, Maine; Carolyn Wichum, Brooklyn N Y • 
Alma Wilby. Atlanta, Ga.; Daniel Carl Will, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Second Row: Denny DuBose Williams, Richmond, Va.; Martha Jane WiUiams, Easton, Pa.; William Orrin 
Wiihams, Southold, N. Y.; James Clay Williamson, Jr., Gastonia, N. C; Dorothy Wilkins, Rockville Centre, N. Y.- 
Andrew Hunter Willis, Jr., Erie, Pa.; John Hibbard Wilmot, River Edge, N. J.; Abraham Samuel Wilson, Durham N. C ' 
Helen Hall Wilson, Beaver, Pa.; Henry Merryman Wilson, Charlotte, N. C. 

Third Row: Mark Douglas Wilson, Clarksburg, W. Va.; Kennon Winston, Minneapolis, Minn.; Jane Winters, 
Greenwich, Conn.; Howard Martin Winterson, Oradell, N. J.; Earnest Lee Withers, Waynesville N C ■ Isabelle 
Wolford, Elizabeth City, N. J.; Olivia Womble, Winston-Salem, N. C; Melvin Nichols Wood, Dalton Mass ■ Mary 
Elizabeth Woodard, Wilson, N. C; Winifred Woodbridge, Grosse Point Park, Mich. 

Fourth Row: Arthur Overton Wooddy, Baltimore, Md.; Lydia Woods, Durham, N. C; Fred Louis Workman Jr 
Kenilworth, III.; Donald Bowman Wright, Scarsdale, N. Y.; John Wright, Jr., Mahwah, N. J.- Margaret Wright 
Orangeburg, S. C; Muriel Wriston, Albany, N. Y.; John Wilbur Wulfers, Morristown, N. J. 

Filth Row: Paul E^rly Wyche, Albemarle, N. C; Robert Bruce Wyman, Arlington, Mass.; Wilfred Buck Yearns Jr 
U Sa ; Wi! ,..ne Yoder, Millersburg, Pa.; Fred Grant Yorke, Bartley, W. Va.; Jack Spurgeon Yountsi 



Z<^Th.T, Labanon, Pa.; Ethel Mae Zuckerman, Durham, N. C. 



166 







Book Three 



FEATURES 



w 



EIRD . . . silent . . . 
still as death, except for the 
occasional flutter of a bird, or 
the gentle rustling of gray moss 
that hangs from the giant limbs 
of century-old cypresses and 
oaks . . . the dismal swamps of 
North Carolina provide an 
enchantment and beauty that 
eludes description. 






From a Photograph by Bayard Wootten 




SPONSORS - FAVORITES 



MRS. ERNEST CRUIKSHANK 



To the Memory of my Mother 
LORA FERRELL WOODRUFF 



MRS. CLAUDE E. MOSSBURG 



MISS OLIVE CRUIKSHANK 



MISS MELISSA ANNE MOSSBURG 




STAFF 



Miss Anne Louise Reist 



Miss Nancy Talbert 



Miss Ulna Saintsing 



FAVORITES 




Miss Laura Lyon 




Miss Katharine Covington 



Miss Jean Miller 



Miss Margaret Morton 




BEAUTIES 




MISS DOROTHY PECK 




\^ 




s 



.^'.»'- 

'W 



^.-■j'-^:" 



■ ^•■^■, 




MISS MARIAN McCLENAGHAN 




MISS ANNE WAGNER 




MISS BETTY FAIRES 




MISS CHARLOTTE SIEHLER 




MISS MARGUERITE DEWEY 




MISS LOIS AITKIN 




♦ «fc 





MISS MARGUERITE NEEL 




MISS BETTY EARLE 




SNAPSHOTS 



Slushing to classes 



The Band 



If 



More snow 




^ 




Dr. Crane attracts an audience "Who dat?" 



Heaven 




Expensive haircut Chronicle at worU— 'Oh yeah !" 



Lazy weather 



"Prexy" in the flesh 



One of the 8 snows 



'Come on out, you sissies" 




Before chapel 



A Duke orchestra aboard S.S. Majestic A. K. Psi dance on the air 






4 




-'-> MT'I 





^. 



Sad return from Tech 



I'm sitting high Victory Ball. . . ^and we forgot the victo 




I^JJ 



i^M. 



"Ask the man who owns one!' 



"I love a parade. 



3. ' 



^ ^ 




Much ado 



Way down South in Dixie ! 





Maestro Joe 



Lookers-on at pep rally and Turpit 




Freshmen buy hats 



Siddell on the job 







Before any game 



"Barley broke it" 



Duke 25— Carolina 



Spirit 



Frank and the Senior Class — pardon, just Frank and the flag 




Blue Devil 



Football stars pose 



Anne and Cliff, but where is 



May Day 



Looking for crips? 



Geniel Mrs. Pembertoi 



■j«* 'v^ 




And then Carolina whips Tech ! 



Morning before the Richmond Mas 







Snowballing and what Esquire is now promoting 



Enthusiasm 




'Eight ball" Arch Our six-sport Ace Cruikshank on the job 



k 



t\ 



:^>- 



u 



/'l'^ ., 



Co-Ed ball under way 



Dr. Brown and Dr. Greene — Co-ed Ball 




Duke 7— State 



r|^L<.,,.. 



Senior float 



V4 



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Men on the flying trapeze 




Baldy the banker 



A new fad 



^- ■ ^: 



*•, •: 



'^-'i^j?'^' Vl",,^^^^^ 



/I, 




Excitement 




Girls play too 






/ 



;^. 







Jl 


wk. 


|v 


^H 




1 




Another pledge 



The Dope Shop — look at "Padre' 




Contrast Carolina ge 



12:20 




'Little Thorny" Home of Siddell's in Raleigh 



A new "Skipper" 



O you kid! 




Frosh out-tug Sophs 



"A little higher, please" Two perfect couples 




What is wrong with this picture? You guessed it 



Daytime activity in East 



Delta Sigs give dance 



Edythe Wright of Dorsey's band 



Football men 




fr^x 









;iA><i 



Our busiest student 



Tension at Raleigh 



School spirit 





mm 


T ■ .J 


p%' 


» vi.>,CV. 


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m 


LM 


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11" 




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Y" men get their men 



J. B. Duke statue dedicated 




Attaboy, Jack 



Cheek to cheek 



Discussion on Peachtree. Street It wasn't hot enough 



The girls are oriented 



Buying books— but try to sell them back 



^^X-t^On Oyt 













Book Four 



ACTIVITIES 




NDUSTRY . . . activity 
. . . progress, contrasting with 
the quiet beauty of fecund 
valleys and stately wooded hills. 
Huge tobacco plantations . . . 
parks and wild game preserves 
...educational institutions, 
sedate and aloof . . . cities and 
hamlets, bustling with the 
activity of commerce, all 
combine to make the beauty of 
the Carolina Piedmont truly one 
of many forms. 






From a Photograph by Bayard Wootten 



nWWWNV^ 



.awe- 

^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 9 ^- 

^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ '^^ ^^^ 
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14^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ (10 ^^ ^^ ' 



PUBLICATIONS 




Earle Runner 
Editor 



STAFF OFFICERS 

William L. Holler 
Associate Editor 

Nancy Hudson 
Co-ed Editor 

Walter Weintz 
Book Review Editor 



THE ARCHIVE 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Sinceits birth some decades ago, the Archive has 
been the primary medium for printing the creative 
writing of Duke University undergraduates. Under 
several editors there existed the policy of printing the 
work of outside writers, but during the past three 
years the pages of the magazine have been devoted 
entirely to the writings of campus men and women. 

Three years ago the Archive was metamorphosed 
from a plain booklet to a magazine approaching its 
present characteristics. The editorial staff for the 
past year has endeavored to collect the best student 
writing and to print it attractively; thus lending its 
mite of aid to the gradual metamorphosis. 

One of the most violent yowls against the Archive 
has for years been the quality of the fiction. During 
the 1935-36 scholastic year, we have attempted to 
find a solution to the evil. It remains for the campus 
itself to prove that there are enough sincere writers 
at Duke — enough writers who can add their essential 
morsels to the potage and prove that Duke deserves its 
appellation. University. 

For a final word, we do say that we've seen quite 
an increase in the Archive readers. Four years ago 
the monthly distribution was followed by miniature 
paper storms in every dormitory. To illustrate the 
increase in popularity, we proudly divulge that the 
perenial playboy, Joe College, was caught reading 
this year's March and April issues. 




Owens 



Holler 



Weintz 



Hudson 



222 




Upchurch Stewart Jones Bean Graeter 

Nixon Ryon Rebman Mann 



THE ARCHIVE 



BUSINESS STAFF 



This year's Archive business staff has completed 
what it believes has been a very successful task. 
Together with the Co-ed business staff, it has solicited 
more national and local advertising than any previous 
Archive. This good fortune has made it possible to 
set up a larger budget than in former years, thus 
appropriating a rather large amount to the publica- 
tion of what the staff feels and earnestly hopes has 
been a better Archive. We feel that these increased 
expenditures, such as funds for varied covers, en- 
gravings, and photographs of Duke University and 
other points of interest, have not been foolishly 
sguandered if the students have derived increased 
satisfaction as a result. 

This year, there has been closer cooperation 
between the business and editorial staffs. Coni 
tributions have been entered from both campuses, 
resulting from encouragement and a greater chance 
for advancement of those men and women who wish 
to try out for staff positions and who are interested 
in the business world. However, we feel that much 
credit should go to the Co-ed business staff, which 
has completed an enormous amount of work, and 
without whose help a successful task could not have 
been accomplished. 

The Archive, after a successful business year, 
looks forward to the rise in prestige of the publication 
in the future. 



STAFF OFFICERS 

Annadale Graeter 
Co-ed Business Manager 

DeWitt Mann 
Circulation Manager 




Phil Russell, Business Manager 



223 




Everett Ferine 
Editor 



The 1935-36 staff of the Duke Chronicle has 
attempted to perpetuate certain high standards of 
journalistic endeavor which have characterized the 
paper throughout its thirty years of existence. In so 
doing, the staff has found it necessary to make several 
innovations adopted for the purpose of developing 
the Chronicle on the basis of modern nev/spaper 



THE DUKE 
CHRONICLE 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

efficiency. The benefits of the change from a weekly 
to as semi -weekly publication— a switch which was 
made a year ago — were realized during the present 
season. The organization of the staff into two groups, 
separated to ease the burden of an ever-increasing 
amount of work, has been done successfully. These 
groups have worked under common leadership, and 
have maintained a high standard throughout the year. 

The editorial columns have been marked by a 
tone of definite conviction. At the same time, they 
have been rather conservative and have successfully 
brought rewards through their influence. The same 
columns purposely have reflected a balanced view 
which has not unduly offended any particular group. 
An attempt has been made through the medium of the 
editorial page to make the Duke Chronicle an organ 
of student opinion through which the student body 
may express, without reservation, their candid obser- 
vations on any and all subjects pertaining to general 
or specific problems of University life. 

Defects still remain and room for improvement may 
be plainly seen, but the present staff feels itself 
justified in believing that it has contributed toward 
creating a true center of enlightenment and educa- 
tion at Duke University. This has been the aim of 
the staff of 1935-1936. It is hoped that future staffs 
will be guided by the same ultimate goal. 




Shriner 


Wenrich 


Johnson 


Siehler 


Boeker 


Henderson 


Leland 


Hessick 


Etter 


Hallock 


Frampton 


Tritie 



224 




Akin Cobleigh Womble Wright Lentz Green Larzelere 

Nixon Gorin Carson Mathews Cockrell Small 

Harrison Bramer Montgomery Gillies 

THE DUKE CHRONICLE 



BUSINESS STAFF 



The success ot the 1935-1936 Chronicle, as a 
business venture, has been largely due to the con- 
scientious efforts of the entire business staff. The 
fine cooperation of the members of the staff has 
resulted in less work for everyone concerned and 
more advertising than during previous years. The 
paper was published under great difficulty during 
the first semester because of a decrease in local 
advertising; local advertising, however, was greatly 
increased through the fine efforts on the part of this 
staff. The organization of the business branch has 
undergone a radical change which has given a 
larger number of individuals more responsibility. 
This action has aroused a keener interest and a 
greater feeling of personal importance in the work, 
essential to the cooperation and ultimate success of 
the entire group. 

Even before the fall semester began, a concentrated 
campaign had been launched by the subscription 
manager resulting in an increased circulation of over 
thirty-six hundred copies. The fine work of the 
advertising manager has already been mentioned. 
The office manager performed his duties of account- 
ing, billing, and collecting in an efficient manner. 
The circulation manager, in charge of the freshman 
staff, has overcome the handicap of inexperienced 
men and has satisfactorily accomplished his task. 
A great deal of credit must be given the Co-ed 
business manager who has established a precedent 



by maintaining a large and active Co-ed staff, which 
has proven to be a valuable asset. 

The entire staff hopes that it has succeeded in its 
sincere endeavor to publish a paper worthy of 
Duke University. 




William Crawford, Business Manager 



225 




Ernest Cruikshank 
Co-Editor 



William 
Co 



THE CHANTICLEER 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

In presenting this, the twenty-third volume of the 
CHANTICLEER, the staff hopes that it has succeeded 
in its purpose, which has been to present a yearbook 
that will serve as a treasured memoir of student days 



at Duke long after those times 
are past — a pictorial chron- 
icle of a year's names, faces, 
and events to be enjoyed now 
and in the future. It is for 
the seniors, especially, that 
we have prepared this 1936 
CHANTICLEER, that the 
memories of their joys and 
sorrows, their friends, their 
work here might go through 
life with them. 

How well the staff has 
achieved its ideals the 
readers will have to judge. 
Although discouraging 
moments have arisen, during 
which we have felt unable to 
cope with the problems at 
hand, we hope that this final 
result of our labors will be 
acceptable. 

Besides the number of faculty and students who 
have aided us, the staff wishes to gratefully acknowl- 
edge the valuable assistance of: "Bill" Bradley, of 
the Photo-Process Engraving Company, Atlanta; Joe 
Hardison, Edwards & Broughton Company, Raleigh; 
H. A. Siddell, Siddell Studio, Raleigh; and D. R. 
Mann, photographer for the "Durham Herald-Sun," 
Durham. 



E. Woodruff 
■Editor 




Lambeth Newton Piper Stack 

Jennings Fulmar Goodman 



Reist 



Mack 



226 




Knight Austin Bradsher Eaby Greenfield Southgate Abbott Jenkinson 

Carpenter Rouse Crannell Everitt Curtiss Cone Graeter 



THE CHANTICLEER 



BUSINESS STAFF 



The task of the business staff of the CHANTICLEER 
is one that may make many of the members unpopular 
at times, involving as it does the necessity of collecting 
money from students, but it has been the aim of this 
year's staff to make it possible for the student to have 
an excellent yearbook, comparable or superior to the 
1935 volume, which was awarded the coveted AU- 
American Honor Rating, and at the same time to 
reduce substantially the fees paid by the seniors, 
while making no increase in the fees paid by 
underclassmen. 

Another criticism which it is hoped will be averted 
this year is the shortage of copies of the book which 
occurred last year, and to a lesser extent the year 
before. This year almost 2,500 copies of the 
CHANTICLEER are being printed, and it should be 
possible for all students to obtain copies of the 1936 
edition. 

The business staff is justly proud of the amount of 
both local and national advertising which it has 
obtained this year. It is deeply grateful to the firms 
and persons who have helped to make the publica- 
tion of the yearbook a financial success. The staff 



urges the readers of the CHANTICLEER to give 
consideration to those business firms who advertise 
in this book, and takes pleasure in recommending 
their products and services. 




Hyatt Mossburg, Business Manager 



227 



ALL AMERICAN CHANTICLEER 



The 1935 CHANTICLEER, first Duke University year- 
book ever to be entered in competition, received the 
All-American Honor Rating. 

Annually, for the past fifteen years, the National Scho- 
lastic Press Association, at the University of Minnesota, 
has conducted a Critical Service, before which have 
come fifteen thousand college and university yearbooks 
for judgment. The judges, after careful consideration 
of theme, make-up, editing, financial status, and mechan- 
ical considerations, award a rating to each book according 
to its relative excellence. These ratings are: All-Ameri- 
can, First Class, Second Class, and Third Class Honor 
Ratings. Fourth Class books receive no honors. 

Last year's CHANTICLEER, entered in the class of 
colleges having an enrollment of less than twenty-five hundred students, distinguished itself, 
along with the yearbooks of the United States Military Academy and the United States Naval 
Academy, by being awarded highest honors. 

It is with much pride that we of the staff of the 1936 CHANTICLEER advance our book as 
representative of the work of Duke University students, hoping that this newest edition of the 
CHANTICLEER is of the same high calibre as the preceeding ones. 




•N'atinnal §rluilastir ^vtsB Aaaoriation 

m.? ALL-AMKRICAN YEARBOOK CH.JJICAL, SERVICE 







rr-it- cc-ja(MTicLttD 

In rfi(H(nlti<in oj its menU' is aworaed 

^11 American l|onor i^ating 

III (Ac Fifteenth Nittiiiniil Yinrliook Critical Scnme of the ISiitional •SchoLstu 

Press Assuiialion <U^' the University of Minnesoto. Department of Journalism, | 

//iM first (lav <>l rJoremher, 79.l5. 



tun" — (Nium 






u^. 



228 




DRAMATICS and MUSIC 




DUKE PLAYERS 



Charles McCallister 
President 



With the largest 
associate member- 
ship of their his- 
tory to encourage 
them, the Duke 
Players have en- 
joyed a most suc- 
cessful season. 
The group is or- 
ganized and main- 
tained by the 
students them- 
selves and serves 
to direct the in- 
terest in drama on both the East and West campuses. 

The program for this, their fifth year, has included 
a balanced selection of four major productions. "The 
Torchbearers," the popular comedy whose clever, 
brilliant humor lifted its author, George Kelly, to 
theatrical fame more than a decade ago, was the 
initial offering. An attractive set, designed and 
executed by George E. White, Jr., made the presenta- 
tion pretentious as well as entertaining. The Duke 
Players point with especial pride to their second 
production, "Ceiling Zero," by Frank Wead. Through 
early arrangements with the publishers they were 
able to secure a professional manuscript, make their 
own copies and produce the amateur premier of this 
melodrama of the airway industry which has since 



appeared as a successful movie attraction. Sound 
effects were imported from New York, and special 
equipment and professional advice were secured 
from the Federal Airlines at Raleigh, N. C, in order 
to make the presentation as technically colorful as 
possible. 

A dramatic favorite of the American and London 
stage, "A Bill of Divorcement," was the third. 
Intense study and rehearsals were necessary in 
handling this work because of its difficult but very 
effective dramatic sequences. A. T. West, director 
of the Players, was included in the cast of this per- 
formance which was enthusiastically received by the 
University's theatre-going public. Plans for the May 
Day presentation were made indefinite by the receipt 
of information which cancelled preparations for a 
revival of the old favorite, "After Dark, or Neither 
Maid, Wife, nor Widow." Several substitutes were 
to be considered, including "Ladies of the Jury" and 
the two melodramatic masterpieces of the old time 
temperance variety, "Ten Nights in a Bar Room" and 
"The Drunkard." 

These productions are manifestations of the work 
that is carried on within the Duke Players' organiza- 
tion. Meetings which are held every other week 
during the school year and to which those interested 
in the theatre are invited, have become very popular. 
At these meetings one-act plays are presented under 
student direction and management offering an oppor- 




Shrmer 


Menaker 


Pankey 


Jones 


White 


Farnsworth 


Schaffle 


Lutz 


Plaster 


Plyler 



230 




Opper 
Franck 



Sutton 
Anderson 



McMartin 
Hunter 



Edwards 
Welsh 



Graeter 
Maier 



DUKE PLAYERS 



tunity for experience in the various phases of play 
production. Members of Theta Alpha Phi, the 
national honorary dramatic fraternity, offer their 
services by way of helpful suggestions to the inex- 
perienced actors and by conducting classes in 
scenery designing, construction, and make-up. 

Theta Alpha Phi conducted a one-act playwriting 
contest this year in an endeavor to stimulate interest 
in that field of drama. The response by the students 
was very gratifying to the organization and plans 
were made for producing the best of the plays for the 
entertainment of the University community, a cash 
prize to be awarded the author of the play most 
enthusiastically received. In addition to their ama- 
teur productions, the Duke Players sponsored the 
appearance in Durham of the Federal Theatre's 
performance of the new historical drama of the 
South, "Jefferson Davis." 

The future of the Duke Players appears to be 
promising, for this year's freshman class has shown 
an exceptional interest in the work of the organiza- 
tion. Elementary plans for next year have already 
been discussed in order that the new season might 
offer a wider variety of activities for a greater number 
of students. 

MEMBERS 
Elizabeth Akin, Connie Allaire, Marie Anderson, 
Dorothy Brown, Carl Clover, James Davis, Dorothy 
Edwards, Al Farnsworth, Joe Fretwell, III, Annadale 



Graeter, Jerry Griffin, Mrs. J. W. Hirst, Robert Hunter, 
Alice Jones, Jane Lee Jones, Carl Lutz, Charles 
McCallister, Jeanne McCauley, Cole McMartin, 
George Maier, Jerry Menaker, Eleanor Myers, 
Dorothy Neff, Nellie Anna Opper, John Pankey, 
Emory Plaster, Mern Plyler, Peggy Price, Sam Reed, 
Evalyn Schaffle, Isobel Shriner, Gladys Souder, 
Elizabeth Sutton, Micky Tobin, Billie Welsh, Evelyn 
White, George E. White, Jr., Ada Whitmore, 
Mildred Williams. 

OFFICERS 
Charles McCallister, President; Cole McMartin, 
Vice President; Isobel Shriner, Secretary; Marie 
Anderson, Co-ed Business Manager; Ada Whitmore, 
Historian. 




A. T. West, Director 



231 




MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



The Men's Glee 
Club is fast be- 
coming one of the 
most prominent or- 
ganizations in the 
field of student ac- 
tivities at the Uni- 
versity. The 
program for this 
year has shown 
considerable ex- 
pansion over that 
of last year. Start- 
ing the 1935-36 
season with many of last year's accomplished singers, 
the squad was closely contested in all departments. 
Upon close examination one finds that even the 
seasoned veterans were hard pushed and often 
replaced by fresh talent. 

During the month of January, the Duke University 
Musical Club, composed of Glee Club and Orchestra, 
gave a concert in Farmville, Virginia. A similar 
trip was carried out in the spring, its itinerary includ- 



Zack Thomas 
President 



ing the ma;or cities in North Carolina. Under the 
capable leadership of J. Foster Barnes these trips 
have proven a success both to the club itself and to 
the school which it represents. The newspaper com- 
ments were quite favorable and the critics unanimous 
in their praise of the balanced strength of the Club 
The Glee Club has also shared, in cooperation with 
other musical units of the college, in the annual 
spring production of a musical comedy. 

MEMBERS 
The Glee Club is composed of the following mem- 
bers: Heyward Henderson, Ernest Winton, J. D. 
Klock, George Davis, Dick Newens, Don Schmitt, 
Miles Gayle, H. Winterson, W. Mason, Ellis Andrews 
John Cole, Joe Mackie, Fulton Main, Al Preyer, R. E. 
Kay, Charles Hooten, Donald Hirst, Tom Windsor, 
C. Finefrock, Jack Barkle, J. P. Wagoner, Herbert 
Upchurch, Zack Thomas, Sizer Chambliss, L. L. 
Turner, George Worthington, Frank Dennis, C. 
Kraemer, J. E. Koonce, W. Bigger, T. Curtis, E. 
Franson, B. B. Guerin, G. Herman, Terry Morris, 
Morgan Rucker, C. Shopmeyer, J. L. Lyttle, Tom 
Cottingham. 



\'t 



^imfmwm 



. I i 



Men's Glee Club 



232 




Women's Glee Club 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 



As the Women's College of Duke University has 
expanded, the Women's Glee Club has increased 
proportionately. At the present time the group con- 
sists of over a hundred members under the capable 
direction of Mrs. J. Foster Barnes. 

For the past several years, the Glee Club has 
appeared in a musical concert on the East campus, 
and each spring has joined the Men's Glee Club in 
presenting an operetta in Page Auditorium. The 
Women's Glee Club is also important in the Chapel 
Choir, which furnishes music for the Sunday services. 

The formation of this club has given women a 
chance to apply their musical talents and to progress 
accordingly with the growth of the musical organiza- 
tions on the men's campus. It is hard to carry out a 
well-rounded education without devoting a sub- 
stantial proportion of one's time to the study of music 
and participation in various phases of the field of 
music. Today, as in the past, it adds color to work 



and play, besides playing an ever more important 
role in culture and recreation. 

MEMBERS 
Adams, Allen, E. Applewhite, I. Applewhite, 
Arthur, Baggs, Barrett, Bassett, Bell, Bogert, M. 
Brown, B. Brown, Butt, Burger, Findley, Fisher, B. 
Eraser, H. Eraser, Garver, Gillin, Goree, Grainger, 
Greenwood, Griffin, Helvenston, Harrison, Henson, 
Hawkins, Holden, Hooker, Hughes, Home, Kincheloe, 
Leinback, Littlejohn, Laws, Mauser, Maxwell, Phil- 
lips, Porterfield, Pugliese, Rankin, Rich, Roe, Ruark, 
Richie, Salmon, Sidbury, Silleck, Shields, Snider, 
Stone, Sewell, Smith, Sultner, Tabor, M. Taylor, 
D. Taylor, Thompson, Titus, Varnes, Wallace, White, 
Willis, V\/'ilson, Williams, D. Zecher, P. Zecher. 




Ida Shaw Applewhite 
President 



233 




KAPPA KAPPA PSI 



Kappa Kappa 
Psi was founded at 
Oklahoma State 
College in the fall 
of 1919, with the 
purpose of recog- 
nizing col lege 
musicians of out- 
standing ability 
and, by their fra- 
ternal efforts, to 
foster greater and 
finer band music. 
During the seven- 
teen years of its existence, the fraternity has enlisted 
thirty-three chapters, and its roster of membership 
includes some of the world's outstanding bandmen, 
such as the late John Philip Sousa, Henry Fillmore, 
Captain Taylor Branson, and William J. Stannard. 

The Duke chapter, Alpha Gamma, was established 
on the campus in 1929. G. E. Leftwich, Jr., was the 
first president of the chapter and began its initial 
progress here; in 1933 Mr. Leftwich was named Vice 



Robert P. Miller 
President 



President of the National Grand Chapter. This year 
Joseph S. Hiatt, Jr., was elected President of the 
Southern District at the National Biennial Convention 
of the fraternity. 

Through the activity of the fraternity in cooperation 
with Director Robert B. Fearing, the Duke University 
Band this year has made definite progress toward 
the development of a greater and bigger unit than 
ever before. In collaboration with the administration 
of the University, the fraternity sponsored the plan 
whereby eligible members of the Band will be 
awarded keys for their service; likewise. Kappa Kappa 
Psi has been the active organ in procuring new 
instruments and uniforms for the Band in the forth- 
coming year. 

OFFICERS 

Robert P. Miller, President; Stanley P. Meyerson, 
Vice President; Joseph S. Hiatt, Jr., Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

HONORARY MEMBER 
Robert B. Fearing, Director of Instrumental Music. 




Hiatt R. W. Miller Meyerson Atkins Bistline Wright Little Bowman 

Palmgren Clayton Rushmer Gerard Steiger Moser Bodine 



234 




Coach Wallace Wade 




DEPARTMENT OF 



Leading the South in its recent rise to athletic equahty 
with the other sections of the country, Duke University's 
athletic teams have, in the past five years, come into 
the national limelight through outstanding perform- 
ances. So rapid has been the rise of Duke in the 
athletic circles of the country that it is now ranked as 
one of the foremost in this section. In the belief that 
a strong athletic program is an integral part of a well- 
balanced educational program, the administration made 
adequate arrangements, a few years ago, to make the 
Duke department as strong as any in the South. The 
administration's initial step toward this goal was select- 
ing Wallace Wade as director of athletics at Duke. 

Coach Wade, who is ranked as one of the foremost 
football mentors of the country, is a firm believer in 
athletics for everyone and, in an effort to give every 
student an opportunity to develop physically as well 
as mentally, brought to Duke Kenneth Gerard to develop 
a system of intramural athletics. The growth of this 
department under the guidance of Coach Gerard has 
been remarkable and it now ranks on a par with that of 



COACHES 




(^ 



W 




Gerard 
Mann 



Coombs 
Voyles 



Cameron 



Caldwell 
Hagler 



236 



ATHLETICS— DUKE 



other great colleges of the country. In addition to the varsity and 
intramural teams, "All-American" and junior varsity squads have been 
formed in the various sports to give those who do not have the ability 
for regular varsity competition opportunity to enjoy athletic contests. 
The junior varsity teams, the first of their kind in the state, play regular 
schedules with smaller colleges. 

On the gridiron the fame of Duke University and its Blue Devil teams 
has spread from the Atlantic to the Pacific coasts, from Canada to the 
Gulf of Mexico, and the great 25-0 victory over Coach Carl Snavely's 
1935 Rose-Bowl-bound University of North Carolina football eleven left 
no doubt that Duke well deserved the honors. In 
a game which found 47,000 fans feasting their 
eyes on the great annual classic, Duke rose to the 
greatest heights ever attained by a Blue Devil 
team. 

Ever since Eddie Cameron took charge of 
basketball at Duke, the Blue Devil cage teams 
have enjoyed successful seasons. The Duke teams 
have not only been sectionally prominent but by 
their conquests of powerful 
non-sectional foes have won 
national repute. Again and 
again have Coach Camer- 
on's men invaded other sec- 
tions to register enviable 
records. 

Under the capable leader- 
ship of Jack Coombs, one of 
the greatest all-time pitchers 
in the diamond history, base- 
ball has become a tradition 
through its fine teams and the 

COACHES 







Warren 



Hendrickson 
Wentz 



Ashworth 

Persons 

Rogers 



Waite 
Polack 
Chambers 
Kelly 



237 




number of players who every year have gone 
into the major leagues to make their marks. 
Duke's most recent contributions to the major 
leagues of the country have been Ty Wagner, 
captain of Duke's 1935 team who is now asso- 
ciated with the Albany nine, and Lovill (Chubby) 
Dean, of the Philadelphia Athletics. 

Track likewise has produced outstanding per- 
formers at Duke. The annual Southern Con- 
ference meet staged at Duke has become one of 
the sport's most interesting spectacles. The 
winning of the conference indoor meet and the 
possibilities for a great out door season point to 
the best track season ever enjoyed at Duke. 

Minor sports are not neglected and with 
com.petent coaches at their helms have 
become very popular with the fans and 
the students. The outstanding minor sport 
at Duke is boxing. Under the direction 
of Add Warren, a former ring great, 
boxing has been advancing so rapidly 
that it has won tremendous popularity and 
interest on a par with that enjoyed by the 




Johnston, Capt. 
Kunkle, Capt. 
George, Capt. 



Lee, Mgr. 
Mossburg, Mgr. 
Wunder, Mgr. 
Lambeth, Mgr. 



Perry, Capt. 



Matulewicz 
Co-Capt. 



Litle Mgr. 
Turner, Mgr. 



238 



major sports. During the past season the Duke 
gym was filled to capacity every time the Blue 
Devil leather-pushers were found performing at 
home. 

Although working under many handicaps Jack 
Persons has always produced swimming teams 
which rank high in the conference. Wrestling 
also comes in for its share of interest and attention. 
Strong teams in tennis and golf have advanced the 
athletic name of Duke University through the South 
and other sections of the country. Every year Duke 
produces golf and tennis players who win national 
recognition. Several stellar players have gone 
on after graduation to make themselves and their 
school famous. The cross-country team has also 
done notable work. The latest Duke 
hill and dale team won the conference 
meet and scored impressive victories 
over conference and non -conference 
opponents. 

At Duke, athletics are destined for a 
greater part in college life, and the 
great progress made along this line has 
been encouraging, indicating that this 
branch of endeavor will take prom- 
inent part in the future growth of the 
University. 








W.,f"^^^'^h j^^ 


v.i 





Ambler, Capt. Boyle, Capt. 




239 



Daniel, Mgr. 
Keater, Mgr. 
Clark, Mgr. 
Glass, Mgr. 



Huiskamp, Capt. 
Sizemore, Co-Capt. 
Parsons, Capt. 
Ardolino, Capt. 



^ ^ o f 




Cheerleaders 



S> c- 




Duke Band 



240 




FOOTBALL 



^ V ci '^ .^v. i^ 
! JLON OO 

nanx 





,"»_, ..s-v •( 



jLiV . t 



-,■'"1, — '--I- -IJT - 



CONFERENCE 
BIG FIVE 




1 v/ 




t 




Captain Johnston 



West 



Duke 25— Carolina 

The 1935 grid season was one of the best in the 
history of the institution . . . under the capable 
mentorship of Wallace Wade ... the Blue Devils 
annexed eight victories . . . INCLUDED IN WHICH 
WAS THE CRUSHING 25-0 TRIUMPH OVER 
CAROLINA'S TAR HEELS ... to win the North 
Carolina BIG FIVE ... and the SOUTHERN CON- 
FERENCE gridiron crowns . . . their lone defeats 
of the season were the one-touchdown setback by 
Georgia Tech and Auburn. ... On the Blue Devil 
victory string hung the scalps of Washington and 
Lee . . . Clemson . . . North Carolina State . . . 
Wake Forest . . . Davidson . . . Tennessee . . . 
South Carolina . . . and North Carolina. 

There were many highlights in these gruelling 
contests . . . but the spectacular 90-yard touch- 
down snake-hipping of Jack Alexander in the 
Carolina-Duke classic . . . after having intercepted 
Jackson's heave . . . was without a doubt the most 
eye-catching . . . and pulse-quickening of the sea- 
son . . . which saw Duke University regaining the 
laurels worn in 1933. 



Curtain Raiser 

Under the glaring mazdas of War Memorial 
stadium ... at Greensboro . . . Duke University's 
Blue Devils cracked their 1935 football campaign 
wide open with a 26-7 victory over a . . . gritty but 
powerless Wake Forest eleven. ... It took the 
Devils the better part of three cantos to get going . . . 
but led by Ace (Clarence) Parker . . . who raced 
across the Deamon Deac final chalk-line on three 
occasions . . . and Silver (Harwood) Smith . . . 
the latest thing in Wade machines left the Deacs 
crumpledby the wayside. . . . First Big Five triumph! 
. . . The lone six-pointer of the enemy came in the 
final period via Morris. 

Track Meet 

A highly-touted South Carolina team came . . . 
saw . . . and was conquered . . . 47-0. . . . The 
inexhaustable Duke powerhouse attack left the 
visitors stunned . . . and sent them back to the 
Gamecock State still wondering if it was a hurricane 
they had encountered. . . . The Dukes rolled up 
seven touchdowns in rapid succession that featured 



244 




Ward 



Taliaferro 



Jack Alexander's 42-yard goalward trot. . . . Par- 
ker's touchdown return of Captain Bud Alexander's 
long punt . . . Honey (Elmore) Hackney's fumble 
. . . recovery . . . and run through the entire 
Gamecock flock to raise the final tally to 47-0. 

Duke Takes Richmond 

The undefeated Duke team journeyed to Richmond 
and completely outclassed a giant General team of 
Washington and Lee. . . . Last year's Southern 



Conference champs were no match for the Blue 
Devils in kicking, passing, and toting the pigskin. 
. . . The result, a 26-0 verdict for the Durham 
aggregation. . . . The Wade forward wall showed 
stone-wall qualities in holding the Generals to downs 
after Parker's punt had been blocked in the hot zone 
. . . the Duke 15. . . . Features of the conflict in 
Richmond were: the high brand of ball which two Vir- 
ginia boys . . . Ace Parker, of Norfolk, . . . and Jule 
Ward, of Galax . . . put on display to thrill fellow- 
Virginians and a band of Duke-zealots who had 



I 




'Alexander picks up eight yards" 



245 




i 




Boyd 



Brunansky 



McAninch 



Boling 



Cannon 



trekked to the Old Dominion capital . . . and a 40- 
yard heave, Parker to Ward, put the Dukes in a scoring 
position . . . with Parker making the grade from 
the 16 . . . Harwood Smith thrilled the crowd with 
a 50-yard dash which was called back. ... A 58- 
yard touchdown jaunt by the tow-headed Ward rang 
up the last score of Duke's first major Southern 
Conference clash. 

"Ace" is "Ace" and West Is West 

A great Duke end answering to the name of Ed 
West shone with brilliance in Duke's next conference 
tilt . . . the 38-12 victory over Clemson . . . when 
he grabbed Troutman's punt . . . and wiggled 67 
yards through a pack of Tigers to register. . . . 
Honey Hackney accounted for the second long 
scoring run of the game ... a 59-yard march. . . . 
Folger and Pennington each contributed to the 
Tiger score from around the Duke two-yard mark. 
. . . NEXT STOP, Georgia Tech! ! ! 

The Old Jinx 

As in the great 1933 season ... the Yellow 
Jackets of Georgia Tech proved the undoing of the 



Blue Devils. . . . The "jinx" came through and 
lateraled itself to a 6-0 victory over the visiting Blue 
Devils. . . . The score at the half was 0-0 . . . 
Honey Hackney replaced Ace Parker . . . who was 
nursing an injury ... in the third canto. . . . Tech 
got its "break" when a terrific tackle by Jones caused 
Hackney to fumble on the Duke 25 . . . Jones 
recovered and with triple and guadruple laterals 
. . . that amazed the visiting Dukes . . . marched 
across the Devil goal line . . . 6-0 (the same score 
as in 1933). 

Plainsnnen Slay 

After the heartbreaking loss on the foreign field of 
Georgia . . . the Devils returned home grimly 
determined to again court Lady Victory . . . but the 
Plainsmen of Auburn had their own ideas . . . and 
eked out a 7-0 win as ever-surging Gantt blocked one 
of Ace's punts with Williams scooping the bounding 
ball for the lone tally of the game . . . the giant boot 
of the Auburn tackle, Paterson, helped to harness the 
Dukes. . . . For three quarters bodies swayed back 
and forth with the exchange of the ball . . . deadly 
blocking . . . powerful line plunges . . . from 



246 



r> <^ 



"^^ ^9f 



McCaskill 



Earngey 



Clark 



Power 



Badgett 



stonewall to impregnable defence . . . failed to 
change the score. 

Homecoming 

Two losses behind them and the HOMECOMING 
fracas with the crack Tennessee eleven next on the 
card . . . the picture looked black for the Devil 
gridders. . . . But Durham's own Elmore Hackney 
hacked and zoomed his way through a stern Vol 
team to wear the garland. . . . The score tied at the 
half . . . 6 to 6 . . . Hackney netted 47 yards on 



three plays to give the onlookers something to look at 
. . . and repeated his touchdown spree in the final 
period . . . Elmore literally gave the game to the 
Dukes, 19-6. HOPES ROSE AGAIN AT THE 
APPROACH OF THE DUKE-CAROLINA CLASSIC! 



Wildcats Caged 

Playing before a Homecoming crowd of Davidson 
alumni . . . the Blue Devils felt it incumbent upon 
them to repeat their win . . . the fleet-footed Hack- 




'Parker carries the ball . . ." 



247 




■ 




Hartness 



Hudgins 



Smith 



Hackney 



Fischer 



ney showed his heels to the 'Cats on a 64-yard run 
. . . piassed neatly to Herbert Hudgins . . . aided 
by the perfect blocking of Frank Liana ... for the 
first touchdown . . . Liana broke into the scoring 
column with an end-around play . . . and the 
Azure Wave rolled on to a 26-0 victory. . . . 

Duke, 25 Carolina, 

Then came the annual Duke-Carolina classic . . . 
amid a steady drizzle . . . 47,000 zealous football 
fans watched a perfectly oiled and timed WADE 
machine smash Carolina's "Rose Bowl" hopes . . . 
25-0 . . . even Jupiter Pluvius smiled at times as the 
Wade legion completely out-classed the supposedly 
invulnerable Tar Heels. . . . There were many 
heroes that day . . . thirteen of them: Jack Alex- 
ander . . . Clarence Parker . . . Jule Ward . . . 
Ed West . . . Jack Hennemier . . . Gus Durner 
. . . Elmore Hackney . . . Sam Gardner . . . Sam 
McCaskill ... Joe Brunansky . . . Captain Jim 
Johnston ... Joe Cardwell . . . and Dick Talia- 
ferro. ... As befitting a great All-American pros- 
pect . . . Ace Parker set the stage for the first Duke 
touchdown ... in the second quarter, Jule Ward, 



on a reverse, hot-footed it 47 yards to hang up the 
precious six-pointer. ... A jam through center by 
Jack Alexander ... in the third stanza . . . boosted 
the Duke score to 13. . . . In the final quarter 
occurred the play which electrified the crowd and 
had the sports scribes taking the silencers off their 
pencils . . . Jack Alexander intercepted Don Jack- 
son's toss and, with his mates giving him perfect 
interference, ran 90 yards to score . . . Parker 
followed with a 30-yard touchdown parade to ring 
the curtain down on one of the greatest gridiron 
games of the year in the collegiate circles of the 
country. . . . Long after the pages of this book have 
turned to brown . . . the 1935 Duke gridiron season 
shall be referred to as DUKE, 25— CAROLINA, 0. 

Curtain Falls 

In a post-climax to the brilliant 1935 grid season 
. . . the Blue Devils eked out a 7-0 win over Hunk 
Anderson's North Carolina State footballers, with 
it annexing the Big Five and Southern Conference 
crowns. . . . The only score of the otherwise slow 
game: Jack Hennemier intercepted Berlinski's pass 
on the State 41 for Duke . . . and Ace Parker cut 



248 



J 




John Johnston 



Lipscomb 



through left tackle for the lone score . . . Sam 
Gardner kicked the extra point. . . . The Wolfpack 
again and again stormed at the Blue Devil goal zone 
only to find the Wade defense impossible to crack. 



On the Honor Rolls 

The conclusion of the 1935 grid season saw Duke's 
mighty quarterback, Clarence (Ace) Parker, being 
named on practically all All-American selections. 
... In addition Parker was unanimously awarded 



the quarterback position on the Southern Conference 
team. . . . On the first team . . . besides Parker 
. . . Gus Durner, tackle . . . Captain Jim Johnston, 
guard; . . . second team: Ed West, end . . . Jule 
Ward, back; . . . third team: Jack Hennemier, 
center . . . Joe Cardwell, tackle . . . Jack Alex- 
ander, fullback; . . . honorable mention: Joe 
Brunansky, tackle . . . Elmore Hackney, back. 

Letters were awarded to: Jack Alexander . . . 
Clarence Badgett . . . Jim Boling . . . Joe Brunan- 
sky . . . Joe Cardwell . . . McCauley Clark . . . 




Tense nnonrient- Duke-Carolina gan^e 



249 



Gus Durner . . . Sam Gardner . . . Willard Earn- 
gey . . . Charles Fischer . . . Elmore Hackney . . . 
Carl Hartness . . . Jack Hennemier . . . Herbert 
Hudgins . . . Captain Jim Johnston . . . Frank 
Liana . . . Woodrow Lipscomb . . . Richard 
McAninch . . . Sam McCaskill . . . Clarence 
Parker . . . Thomas Power . . . Harwood Smith 
. . . Richard Taliaferro . . . Jule Ward ... Ed 
West . . . and Carl Lee, Jr., student manager. 

B Team 

In the first year of its organization . . . the B 
team . . . which gives men a chance to play com- 
petitive football who might not otherwise see action 



. . . won its spurs. ... Its season shows four losses 
and a single victory. ... In the opener, Lenoir 
Rhyne rolled over the B team 9 to 6 . . . but the 
Seconds would not be denied . . . and won a game 
that resembled a track meet . . . from Campbell 
College . . . 39 to 0. . . . Elon proved too much 
for them, however, and they went down 13-0. . . . 
They lost to Oak Ridge, 13-0 .. . and Navy B 
team, 18-0. 

Johnny Johnson was outstanding throughout the 
season . . . accounting for three touchdowns against 
Campbell College . . . and Hal Stephens turned in 
nice playing in the backfield. ... To Coaches 
"Shipwreck" Kelley . . . and Earle Wentz ... go 
our congratulations. 




(5 9 



A 








Fourth Row: Hackney, Davis, Earngey, Williams, Germino, Greenwood, Cardwell, Crawford, 

Hudgins, Lipscomb, Finn, Hooks, Lenox 
Third Row: Badgett, Harris, Gregson, Hartness, Clark, Eakins, Fischer, Brunansky, Cannon, 

Carpenter, Burton, Bowers, Baldwin 
Second Row: Liana, Taliaferro, Durner, Ed. West, Ward, Power, Johnston, Hennemier, McAninch, 

McCaskill, Boling, Alexander, Parker 
First Row: John Johnston, West, Boyd, Smith, Meng, Gardner, Stephens 



250 




BASKETBALL 




Kunkle 
Podger 
Herrick 



Huiskamp 
Cheek 



BASKETBALL 



Sports Stars 

None of the Duke 1935-36 athletic teams . . . had 
a better start than Coach Eddie Cameron's Blue 
Devil cage team. . . . With only two regulars back 
from the crack 1934-35 team . . . the Duke mentor 
moulded a team which scored a string of thirteen 
consecutive victories before being defeated. . . . 
Taking all things into consideration . . . Duke had 
a very successful basketball season . . . the Blue 
Devil floor team scoring twenty wins in twenty-five 
starts. . . . 

Some of the outstanding cage teams of the country 
. . . which fell before Duke were . . . North Caro- 
lina . . . Yale . . . Army . . . Catholic U. . . . 
Princeton . . . University of Richmond . . . and 
. . . Baltimore University. . . . 

Satellites 

During the hard campaign, the playing of the 
following Blue Devil cagers was notable . . . Cap- 
tain Charlie Kunkle . . . who was second high- 
scorer of the team . . . Billy Huiskamp . . . given 
honorable Southern Conference tourney mention 
. . . Ken Podger . . . high scorer and tourney 
choice . . . Fred Edwards . . . sophomore forward 
. . . Bud Herrick . . . Clarence Parker . . . Duke's 
famed Ail-American footballer of the 1935 season 
. . . Joe Riley . . . Duke's flashy basketeer . . . 
and Johnny Hoffman. 

Duke opened its 1935-36 campaign with an impres- 
sive 39-36 win over the strong Catholic University 
five and on the following night defeated Baltimore 
U. 49-29 . . . before laying off for the Christmas 
vacations. . . . With the resuming of school, the 
Blue Devils topped the Elon College guintet, 58-42. 
. . . The next night in the Duke gym, a visiting Eli 
team of Yale University was able to give Coach 
Cameron's boys little more than a practise session 
... as the game ended in rout of the Elis, 52-17. . . . 
Three days later . . . Duke administered a 36-28 
win to V/offord College of South Carolina. . . . 




252 



BASKETBALL 



Opened its Big Five season . . . with an impressive 
46-24 triumph . . . over the Wildcats of Davidson 
College. 

Deacs Downed 

A gritty Wake Forest quint was next to fall before 
the onslaught of the Blue Devils . . . 37-19. . . . 
In their first Southern Conference tilt . . . the Devils 
routed the Virginia Cavaliers . . . 54-29 to rise on 
the conference horizon as possible champions. . . . 
On its second Northern trek . . . the Blue Devils 
trimmed the Tigers of Princeton University . . . 
40-26 . . . and bettered the veteran West Point 
Cadet team . . . 31-29 . . . with Huiskamp and 
Podger in the shining roles. . . . 

For the next ten days . . . until January 25 . . . 
the Duke basketeers busied themselves with mid- 
semester exams ... it was during this period that 
Duke's diminutive forward . . . who had rung up a 
game record of 10-points per . . . was obliged to 
undergo an appendicitis operation . . . breaking up 
the Duke starting lineup. 

Huiskamp Out 

Without the services of its high-scorer . . . Duke 
resumed its cage schedule on January 25 . . . faced 
N. C. State at Raleigh. ... In a bitterly fought and 
brilliant tussle . . . Duke suffered its first defeat of 
the season . . . when N. C. State's last minute rally 
gave them a 36-33 win. ... In their next tilt . . . 
Duke defeated V. P. I. by the double score of 40-20. 
. . . However, a stubborn Old Liner team of Mary- 
land University . . . surprised the Devil five . . . 
and managed a 38-34 victory over the visiting Durham 
aggregation. . . . 

U. N. C. Classic 

Then came the annual Duke-North Carolina classic! 
... In one of the finest floor gamios staged this year 
. . . Duke out-fought and out-smarted the Tar Heels 




Edwards 
Dean 



Riley 

Parker 

Wood 




253 




BASKETBALL 



to earn a 36-34 win ... in an extra period session 
. . . over ultimate 1936 Southern Conference cage 
champions. ... It was a great game in which Duke 
showed just what it was capable of. . . . In their 
next two games . . . the Blue Devils defeated the 
University of Virginia for the second time . . . 44-21 
. . . University of Richmond, co-champions of Vir- 
ginia . . . 31-27. . . . Before meeting North Caro- 
lina in their second game of the year . . . Duke 
trimmed Davidson College . . . 36-33 ... in a 
hard-fought fray . . . University of Florida . . . 42- 
31 . . . and Wake Forest . . . 42-27. 



U. N. C. No. 2 

Duke and North Carolina met in 

and the visiting Tar Heels evened 

. . . eking out a victory from the 

. N. C. State ... in 

. . bettered the Blue 

victory went into the 

. . . Duke brought its 

tussle with the powerful 



Griffith 

Ashby 

Thomas 



Wright 

Hoffman 

Eakin 



On February 21, 
the Duke gym . . . 
the seasonal scores 
Blue Devils . . . 33-28 
another second half rally . 
Devils . . . and the 32-29 
coffers of the Red Terrors, 
season to a close . . . with a 

Washington and Lee cage team in Lynchburg, Va. 
. . . The Generals staged their greatest game of the 
year . . . defeating the Devils . . . 43-27 ... to 
establish themselves as the pre-tourney favorites of 
the Southern Conference tournament. . . . Duke was 
eliminated in the first round of the tourney . . . 
when a hard-passing and battling University of 
Maryland quintet . . . took the game by a 47-35 
verdict. 

LETTERMEN 

Herbert Cheek, Fred C. Edwards, A. L. Herrick, John 
Hoffman, C. W. Huiskamp, C. W. Kunkle, Clarence Parker, 
Kennet Podger, J. W. Riley, H. Mossburg, manager. 




Front Row: 
Podger 
Cheek 
Riley 
Kunkle, 

Captain 
Wood 
Parker 
Huiskamp 

Back Row; 

Mossburg, 
Manager 
Herrick 
Quick 
Caldwell 
Edwards 
Hoffman 
Schlesinger 



254 




BASEBALL 




BASEBALL 



MARCH ON 

As March went out like a lamb . . . the Duke baseball team 
started their trek toward the Big Five championship. . . They 
downed Chatham Mills 6 to 4 . . . and 11 to 10 . . . on succes- 
sive days at Elkin ... in characteristically ragged openers 
. . . and prepared to twist the visiting Clemson tiger's tail . . . 
in the first clash on their home diamond ... to open their 
Southern Conference crown race. 

APRIL FOOL 

Poor fielding prevented a double victory . . . as they dropped 
a 3-0 decision in the nightcap . . . after a 12 to 8 win in the 
April opener. . . . The nine went on to crush Elon easily . . . 
10 to 2 . . . George Barley making his varsity debut in a six- 
hitter . . . against the University of Michigan . . . Pete Nak- 
tenis with his freak delivery . . . hurled nine innings of good 
ball . . . and gave the Devils a 4 to victory ... in a near- 
no-hit no-run game. ... A fluke hit in the third spoiled his 
ticket to the Baseball hall of fame. 

QUAKER VICTORY 

On April 10 the Demon Deacs mixed two safeties with four 
walks in the second inning ... to count all runs . . . and 
gain a 5 to 1 decision over the visiting Dukes. . . . Next, against 
Guilford College's Quaker Club . . . The Devils eked out a 
6-4 win . . . in a game that was contested all the way ... by 
a surprisingly strong Guilford nine. 



W. Huiskamp 

Parker 

Cheek 



Center 

Ambler 
Shorten 
Naktenis 



Right 

Wentz 

Liana 

Corbitt 




256 



BASEBALL 



In a contest featuring the annual spring blossom festival . . . 
the Devils made two v/ins in a row . . . over Davidson, with a 
6 to 3 decision. . . . Ace Parker cracked cut a triple and a 
homer to lead with the pole . . . after a win the previous day 
. . . 5 to 1 . . . the first defeats the Wildcats had suffered 
in '35. . . . 

A WAITING GAME 
The State nine tried to escape defeat by delaying the game 
. . . according to the umpire's decision . . . who awarded. 
Duke the game . . . 9 to . . . before darkness set in. . . . 
The game was in the tenth frame, with the Dukes ahead, 13 to 7 
... A single by Don Mitchel with Pete Naktenis scoring from 
third gave Duke a 3-2 decision over Davidson ... in a ten- 
inning game. . . . And the following afternoon, the Devil nine 
took a batting practice . . . swamping the Wildcats 13 to C 
. . . making it six wins in a row and strengthening the Devils' 
hold on the Big Five leadership. 

EASTER BUNNY 

The Blue Devils celebrated Easter Monday by scampering off 
with 13 to 1 and 7 to 2 verdicts over the University of South 
Carolina . . . running their win streak to eight tilts. . . . 

A win over Wake Forest . . . 8 to 6 . . . made it six con- 
secutive ... in the Big Five . . . with a loss only to Wake 
Forest . . . Reynolds May, stocky right-hander . . . blanked 
N. C. State for six innings before the Wolfpack counted four to 
Duke's ten. 



Left 

Konopka 

Barley 

Morris 



Center 

Landon 
McMaster 
C. Huiskamp 




Right 

Conradi 

Ewing 

Rasberry 




257 



BASEBALL 



Duke counted a run in the ninth to draw into a tie 
and ward off defeat and then . . . bunched hits four 
innings later ... to take a clash from Wake Forest 
. . . 10 to 7. . . . The Blue Devils opened their an- 
nual Northern invasion with a win over . . . George- 
town ... 4 to 1 in their twelfth straight victory . . . 
but were bombarded by the University of Maryland 
. . . who came from behind to defeat the Devils . . . 
12 to 4. 

NORTHERN INVASION 

In a May day clash . . . the Dukes invaded 
Princeton and came out with a 13 to victory as 
George Barley . . . fanned ten and gave three 
singles. . . . The next day the Dukes pounded three 
Fordham hurlers ... for twelve hits which reg- 
istered ten runs to the Rams' four. 

On to Annapolis the roving Devils sank the Navy 
. . . 3-0 in a dual between Reynolds May . . . and 



the Middie moundman . . . McGowin. . . . Duke 
defeated State for the third time, May 8 . . . 11 to 5 
. . . taking the lead in the Big Five flag race. . . . 

ARCH-RIVALS 

In a closing series with Duke's arch-rivals from 
Chapel Hill . . . the Devils took all three games: 7 
to 2 ... 4 to ... and 14 to 0. .. . Ken Weafer, 
who pitched last season's win for the Blue Devils 
. . . checking a 26-game Tar Heel win streak . . . 
tossed. 

Letters went to Wayne Ambler, George Barley, 
Herbert Cheek, Claude Corbitt, B. O. Cornelius, 
Dixon Dailey, Sam Ewing, Bill Huiskamp, Al Konopka, 
Rod Landon, Reynolds May, Dave Michael, Don 
Mitchell, Pete Naktenis, Clarence Parker, John 
Shorten, Ed Taylor, Captain Ty Wagner, Ken Weafer, 
Earl Wentz, Jerry Marion, student manager. 







t 







I 



f^ 








Codcl» Coombs Poikei Cornelius Lidiid Davis Thompson McMdster Konopka 

Ambler Ogburn C. Huiskamp Corbitt Shortell Morris Ewing W. Huiskamp 

Dailey Weafer Landon May Captain Wagner Taylor Mitchell 

"Red" Merrill 



258 




TRACK 




TRACK 



SUCCESSFUL START 

With an extra week of training . . . occasioned by the 
cancellation ... on account of snow . . . of a meet scheduled 
for March 8 with V. M. I . . . the Duke tracksters met William 
and Mary in the Duke stadium . . . and rang up the curtain on 
their 1935 season with a 71 1-3 to 54 2-3 win. 

The Blue Devils took 12 out of 14 second places ... to 
overcome the heroic efforts of Monk Little . . . who rang up 
20 points single-handed for the visitors. . . . The Williams 
brothers and Kraushaar swept the field in the shot put . . . 
and Shehan, Pruitt, and Winstead came through in the 440 
... in the only clean sweep to the honor of the Dukes. . . . 
Field and running honors were practically divided. 

LANDSLIDE 

Having tasted of victory, the harriers swept on ... to a 
landslide victory over a visiting W. and L. sguad . . . with the 
final count 97 to 29. . . . The Devils were, however, not 
impressive on a slow track . . . Martin captured the honors for 
the Blue and White sguad going over the high hurdles in 15.5 
seconds. . . . All firsts except the mile and two-mile . . . 
which went to Dick Dunja, one of the South's best distance 
runners . . . and the discus . . . went to Duke with most of 
the seconds. 



Left Center Right 

West Kraushaar Sizemore 

Pickard George Woodard 

Morse Shehan 

Myres Hackney 




260 



TRACK 



NEMESIS 

The Nemesis, North CaroUna University team, however, 
broke the Devil's win record . . . defeating them 73 to 53 
... at Chapel Hill. . . . The Duke team took an early lead 
with its strength in the field events . . . but was passed in the 
running and hurdles. . . . Woodard took first place in the 100 
and 200-yard dashes . . . and Leidy, Moore, Myres, McGrail, 
and West captured blue ribbons for Duke in the field events. 

CONFERENCE MEET 

In the conference meet at Chapel Hill the champion Tar Heels 
surged ahead to nose out the Duke cinder path and weight men 
... to take their 14th consecutive conference championship. 
The Blue Devils showed surprising strength in the preliminaries 
. . . setting the pace for the meet. . . . The Chapel Hillmen 
still held the odds, however. ... At the end of the first eight 
events . . . Duke held the lead . . . but ... a clean sweep 
of all four places in the half mile . . . gave Carolina first 
position. 

Harry Williamson . . . Carolina's brilliant runner . . . and 
Woodard, the Blue Devil dash ace . . . ran up high-score 
positions for themselves . . . with ten points . . . gained by 
two firsts each . . . Woodard took the 100 and 200-yard 
dashes. . . . Final scores; Carolina, 75 1-2; Duke, 67. 



Left 

McGrail 
Koop 
Moore 
Johnston 



Center 

Krizek 
Leidy 



Right 

Fischer 
Hanes 
Stroud 
Pruitt 






261 



TRACK 



REVENGE 

The Duke harriers . . . still smarting under their 
pair of disappointments . . . took into camp a totally 
unequal Davidson team ... 101 to 25 at Davidson. 
. . . The Dukes started by sweeping the 100-yard 
dash . . . and maintained their lead for the entire 
stretch . . . Moore broke the Duke pole vault record 
. . . with a leap of 12 feet . . . and Myres jumped 
6 3-4 feet . . . to set a new high jump record. 

'36 OPENER 

The Devil trackmen started their '36 season with a 
vengeance . . . taking the indoor track meet in 
Duke gymnasium . . . defeating the defending cham- 
pions of North Carolina ... by the margin of 17 
points. . . . The Demons from Duke had won the 
meet . . . after ten of the twelve . . . events had 
been run off. . . . 

Eight new records were set and one tied . . . 
Duke's score of 48 points . . . it's the highest ever 
made ... in the seven years of the games. . . . 



Frank Sizemore amassed six points ... to be high 
scorer for the Devils. 



AND THEN . . . 

Although all Conference records stood as far as 
the Devils were concerned . . . University records 
were broken in many fields . . . Martin jacked up 
the high-hurdles record to 15.5 . . . West heaved 
the javelin to 250 feet, 5 inches . . . Moore pole- 
vaulted to a new record of 12 feet, 7 3-4 inches . . . 
and Myres high-jumped to 6 feet 3-4 inches. 

TRACK LETTERMEN— 1935 

Richard Atkinson, O. C. Britton, Judson George, 
Huber Hanes, Jack Heritage, Jack Kneipp, Lloyd 
Kraushaar, Joe Leidy, Robert Martin, Myles McGrail, 
Huber Moore, William Morse, Hillman Myres, Edward 
Peabody, John Pickard, Charles Pruitt, Al Reichman, 
Mason Shehan, Frank Sizemore, Elmer Tarrall, Harry 
Woodard, and Joe Shieferly, student manager. 



C5 



(^} '^ Q ^' ^ 



'jT^Q* kA| mm cA rA Em ^B 





^g gq ^Q j^Qi ' gn \ 






Coach Voyles, Heritage, West, Dator, Kraushaar, Sizemore, Atkinson, Myres, Shehan, Mditin, Stoneburner, 

George, Stroud. 
Morse, Webb, Tarrell, Pickard, Carman, L. Williams, Captain Reichman, M. Williams, Winsted, Kneipp, 

Pruitt, Leidy. 



262 




MINOR SPORTS 




Manager Wunder Ferris Morse Pruitt Dator Naudain Captain George Koop Coach Ashworth 



CROSS-COUNTRY 



CROSS-COUNTRY SQUAD UNDEFEATED 
The Blue Devil cross-country team won itself a 
place in the University hall of fame . . . going 
through an undefeated season . . . and sweeping 
on to first place in the Southern Conference meet. 

It was Coach Charles Ashworth's first Devil sguad 
of hill and dalers . . . which toppled the defending 
North Carolina University champions ... in the 
North Carolina run ... by a three-point margin to 
garner the crown. . . . Led by Bill Morse . . . the 
Azure wave swept in ahead of all opposition. 

The Devils opened their season . . . with a 36 to 
19 win over the Galloping Gobs at Annapolis . . . 
with Morse and Charles Koop . . . both Dukemen 
. . . tied for first . . . and Captain George cutting 
the tape third. 

In their first home meet, they completely outclassed 
a band of Richmond runners ... 42 to 20 .. . and 
followed this victory with a win over the North 
Carolina Stale harriers ... 44 to 19. 



Not until they met the Carolina Tar Heels were 
the Devils hard pressed. . . . The outcome of that 
meet was in doubt until the last man was home. 

In the Southern Conference clash, the Tar Heels 
were favored to retain their crown . . . but the 
Blue Devils took seven places . . . and set a record 
on a snow-covered . . . wind-swept . . . course: 
Morse romped in first . . . Koop, second . . . Pruitt, 
sixth . . . Captain George, eighth . . . Ferris, ninth 
. . . Dator, twelfth . . . and Naudain, thirteenth. 
. . . Bill Morse set a new record of 26:25.9 to take 
the blue ribbon. . . . 

With all the runners in the conference meet 
returning in 1936-37 . . . and a capable squad of 
freshmen coming up . . . prospects point toward a 
repetition of the historic season of 1935-36. 

CROSS-COUNTRY LETTERMEN -1935 
Frank Dator, Douglas Ferris, Judson George, 
Charles Koop, William Morse, Parker Naudain, 
Charles Pruitt, and C. E. Wunder, student manager. 



264 




Mervine 


Bender 


Fletcher 


Kraushaar 


Lamb 


Thomas 


Hinck 


Garden 


O'Brien 


Morris 


Ambler 


Beatty 


Huiskamp 


Fuller 



SOCCER 



The first official soccer in Duke history was insti- 
tuted in 1935 . . . when a squad . . . coached by 
Jerry Gerard . . . rang up an impressive record 
... of four wins . . . a tie . . . and a single 
defeat . . . which was at the hands of High Point 
. . . 4 to 1 . . . Davidson-Duke played to a scoreless 
tie. 

Concurrent with the University opening in Septem- 
ber . . . came a movement for athletic-board-spon- 
sored soccer . . . which was finally successful . . . 
and Jerry Gerard was called upon to field a team to 
wear the blue and white ... in inter-collegiate 
competition. . . . After a few weeks practice, the 
novice team locked horns with one of the oldest 
aggregations in the state . . . High Point . . . and 
defeated the visitors . . . 3 to 2. . . . Duke's first 
official soccer season was under way! 

In a return match with the Panthers at High Point 
. . . the Devils ran up against a 4 to 1 defeat ... in 
which Culler . . . Panther captain . . . played in- 
spired ball that baffled the visitors. 



One week later . . . the Devils returned to High 
Point ... to meet the strong "Y" team there . . . 
and won ... 2 to 1 ... on a quick kick by Morris 
that gave the Dukes the lead which they did not 
relinquish. 

The Blue and White rode on the crest of victory 
over: Durham "Y" . . . 2 to 1 . . . and Davidson 
... an upset . . . 3 to 1 . . . setting up the Devils 
as one of the outstanding teams of the state . . . with 
stars in Ambler and Morris. 

The 1935 season ended at Davidson . . . with a 
scoreless deadlock which stood, despite valiant 
efforts by both teams to waft the sphere into paying 
territory. 

Graduation takes only two men from the '35 squad 
. . . and Coach Gerard will have nearly his entire 
first team available . . . with more experience 
behind them ... to draw on ... for a veteran '36 
squad . . . which will probably play a bigger . . . 
and tougher . . . schedule than the first soccer year. 



265 




Al Mann Matulewicz Schmitt 

Koger Kneipp Farrar W. Mann 



Coach Warren 
Price 



BOXING 



Led by its co-captains . . . Ray Matulewicz and 
Al Mann . . . the Blue Devil boxing team registered 
one of the finest records ... on the Duke athletic 
books. ... It was undefeated in dual meets . . . 
and was classed as one of the finest ring teams ... in 
college circles. ... At the annual Southern Con- 
ference tournament . . . Duke copped a second 
place . . . with Jack Kneipp and Ray Matulewicz 
carrying off lightweight and light heavyweight 
crowns, respectively. . . . Danny Farrar . . . rated 
as one of the outstanding candidates for the U. S. 
Olympic boxing octet . . . and world's amateur 
welterweight champion . . . through an unlooked- 
for eye injury . . . was not able to compete in the 
finals of the tourney . . . thus weakening Duke's 
chances of winning the conference title. . . . Co- 
captain Al Mann . . . defending 155-pound cham- 
pion . . . reached the finals of the 165-pound class 
. . . only to lose a close decision to Novich ... of 
North Carolina University. 

Coach Add Warren's Duke boxers started their 
1935-36 season . . . with an impressive 6-2 victory 
over South Carolina . . . administered a 6-2 drub- 
bing to the University of Richmond Spiders . . . 
riddled the strong Catholic University leather team, 
6-2 . . . received an 8-0 forfeit from the N. C. State 
team . . . and fought to a 4-4 draw with the great 
University of West Virginia boxing team . . . East- 



ern Inter-collegiate champs . . . and one of the 
finest in the country ... in a spectacular meet. 
The annual bout with the University of North Carolina 
was cancelled. 

In dual meets . . . three members of the sguad 
. . . Danny Farrar, Jack Kneipp, Al Mann . . . 
were undefeated . . . Kneipp and Farrar scored 
every one of their dual wins . . . via the k.o. route 
. . . and from lightweight to light heavyweight 
became known as the "Murderers Row." . . . 

The personnel of this great team was made up of 
. . . Bobby Koger, bantamweight . . . Bobby Price, 
featherweight . . . Jack Kneipp, lightweight . . . 
Danny Farrar, welterweight . . . Wilton Mann, jun- 
ior middleweight . . . Co-captain Al Mann, middle- 
weight . . . Co-captain Ray Matulewicz, light 
heavyweight . . . and Don Schmitt, heavyweight. 

With the entire team back next year . . . Coach 
Add Warren . . . himself a great boxer in past 
years . . . should enjoy . . . along with his boys 
... a greater and even more successful season. 

BOXING LETTERMEN -1935-36 

Danny Farrar, Raymond Matulewicz, Al Mann, Jack 
Kneipp, Wilton Mann, Don Schmitt, Robert Price, 
Robert Koger, and Francis Little, student manager. 



266 




Coach Neely 


Downs 


Haines 


Katz 


Manager Glass 


Stevenson 


Windsor 


Ardolino 
"Mascot" 


Brown 


Friedlander 



WRESTLING 



The Duke wrestUng squad was swept before an 
overwhelming band of Washington and Lee matmen 
. . . who blanked the Devils ... as both squads 
opened their 1936 seasons. . . . The Generals took 
seven falls . . . and one time advantage ... to 
roll up 38 points. 

The Blue Devils showed considerable improve- 
ment . . . when they met Davidson . . . although 
they were on the unfavorable end of a 16 to 12 
decision. . . . Trailing 5 to 12 at the end of five 
matches . . . the Wildcats went to work and scored 
11 points in the next three events. 

In their third meet of the season . . . the grapplers 
lost a 14 to 12 verdict to N. C. State ... in Franklin 
Thomas Memorial Gymnasium. . . . There was only 
one fall scored in the meet . . . that by Thompson 
. . . who threw Haines to break a deadlock and give 
State a safe advantage. 



The rival Carolina matmen took Duke into camp 
... 16 to 14 .. . after trailing 5 to 11. . . . In the 
last clash before the Southern Conference meet . . . 
the Dukes fell before the attack of the V. M. I. mat 
men ... 27 to 3 ... in the Duke gym. 

With the conference meet ... a "family affair" 
between W. and L. and V. M. I. . . . the Duke 
wrestling team was able to show only three points. 

Although the Duke matmen were defeated in all 
of their major meets and failed to win any crowns 
. . . they showed good form and general improve- 
ment with each succeeding encounter . . . with the 
entire team back next year . . . Coach Neeley is 
expected to turn out a representative wrestling squad. 

Varsitymen who were awarded letters were: 
Captain John Ardolino, . . . Irwin Friedlander, . . . 
Gilbert Katz, . . . RobertS tevenson, . . . and Don 
Glass, student manager. 



267 




Lampe 



Glagola 



Blanchard 



Poe 



Powell 



Deupree 



Perry Manager Lambeth 



GOLF 



SEVEN OF ELEVEN 

The EXike golfers took seven of eleven inter- 
collegiate matches in 1935 and captured the State 
and Conference titles. . . . They started the season 
right with a win over Furman ... 10 1-2 to 7 1-2 
. . . but slumped in the following clash . . . losing 
to Georgia Tech ... 10 1-2 to 7 1-2. . . . The next 
day . . . they romped over Emory ... 14 1-2 to 
3 1-2... and continued to win over Georgia, 2 1-2 
to Duke's 15 1-2 .. . Florida, 4 1-2 to 13 1-2 .. . 
and N. C. State 1-2 to 17 1-2 .. . Georgia Tech 
again upset them . . . but did not take the decision 
. . . gaining only a 9-9 draw . . . North Carolina 
University . . . two days later . . . did overcome 
the Duke golfers . . . 10 to 8. . . . The Devils came 
back in the two following meets ... to down 



Furman ... 11 1-2 to 6 1-2 . . . and N. C. State 
... 16 1-2 to 1 1-2. 

At the State meet . . . Duke lead the teams home 
. . . requiring only 612 aggregate strokes ... to 
do the stretch ... to 619 for N. C. U. . . . and 
635 for N. C. State. 

In an interval between the State meet and the 
Conference meet . . . the Devils gained another 
victory . . . over N. C. U. . . . 10 1-2 to 7 1-2.. 
and went on to set the Southern Conference crown 
securely on their heads . . . with a lead of 13 
strokes over N. C. State . . . their nearest rivals. 
. . . The Devils came through in 613 strokes . . . 
and the Statesmen took 626. 

Letters were awarded to: Clifford Perry, Bayard 
Storm, Walter Justin, Joe Powell, T. D. Pimper, 
student manager. 



268 



c 



sl 



u "" y nil 

^Tennis /' » '"' 




TCNNIS , \TeNN15 ,| 1 



< nil 




G 



•JT^ 



I i 1 1 1 1 ' « ^ 




^iLv. 



Coach Fogleman Beich Gil 



Caton Wright Parsons Kellmyer 



Ashby 



TENNIS 



The Blue Devil tennis team opened its 1935 activ- 
ities in a tie with the Ohio State raqueteers . . . 3-3 
... by virtue of a finals doubles win with Nick Ashby 
and Charlie Gill figuring. . . . Their next meet . . . 
with the Carolina Tar Heels ... set them back to 
a 1 to 5 loss ... in a match cut short by rain . . . 
before Duke could send in its strong doubles scorers. 

Two days later . . . thirsting for their delayed, 
victory . . . the courtsters journied to Southern 
Pines ... to take the State tennis team into camp 
. . . 9 to . . . sweeping clean all classes. . . . 
And on April 30 . . . the Devils repeated their 9-0 
performance . . . over Wake Forest. . . . They 
again swept through the Deacons on May 3. 

They were unable to withstand a strong attack by 
the University of Virginia courtsters . . . who eked 
out a 5 to 4 victory . . . taking all the singles . . . 
and losing to Duke in the doubles. . . . With their 



usual all-or-nothing spirit . . . the Devil raqueteers 
went on to blank William and Mary . . . and took 
a 7 to 2 win from George Washington University. 

At Princeton, they again met a Waterloo . . . 
dropping a match to the Tigers ... by their usual 
score . . . but with themselves on the small end 
of the 9 to score. 

The Tars of Annapolis sank 2-7 under the attack 
of the fighting Devils . . . fresh from a smarting 
defeat in the hands of Princeton . . . and the Dukes 
rang down the curtain on their 1935 season with an 
8 to 1 victory over the North Carolina State netters. 

TENNIS LETTERMEN— 1935 

Donald McNeil, James Martin, Thomas Parsons, 
David Caton, Charles Gill, Nicholson Ashby, and 
Martin Shapiro, student manager. 



269 




Manager Turner Doniger Jones Kuemper Kurtz Ginsberg Kraushaar Bailey Stokes Winton Burwell 



SWIMMING 



The Blue Devils opened their swimming season 
inauspiciously . . . with a 30 to 51 loss to Virginia 
... in their own pool . . . and went on to William 
and Mary ... to open their season on foreign fields. 
. . . The Williamsburg team was a little too speedy 
for the visiting Dukes . . . who dropped the decision 
42 to 41 ... in a heart-breaking meet . . . espe- 
cially to Dailey . . . who broke the W. and M. pool 
record of 2:37.3. 

Returning to North Carolina . . . the Duke mer- 
men faced N. C. State in a dual meet which they lost 
... 51 1-2 to 30 1-2. . . . The State quartet set a 
new pool record winning the 400-yard relay . . . 
and Captain Carroll Dailey, of Duke, set up a new 
pool record in the 200-yard breast stroke . . . 
registering Dukes only first place in the meet. 

Smarting under their bad streak on the records 
. . . the mermen unmercilously trounced the V. P. 1. 
natators . . . with Dailey again turning in a pool 
record . . . 2:41.7 . . . and leading the Devils to 



a 53 to 31 win . . . and Colson, of Duke . 
hung up a new pool record in the 220. 



also 



Duke paid a surprise visit to the W. and L. mermen 
. . . who took them over the traditional rocks . . . 
54 to 30. . . . The Generals were not expecting 
their visitors . . . due to a mix up in arrangements 
. . . and the meet was delayed while the swimmers 
were gathered together. 

After a rest occasioned by a cancelled meet with 
the Goldsboro Y. M. C. A. . . . the Dukes locked 
horns with Clemson and came out on the pleasant end 
of a 44 to 39 count. 

Then came the conference meet in the Duke pool. 
. . . With four losses to half as many wins . . . the 
Devils were not favored to show to advantage . . . 
in the conference meet ... in their own pool . . . 
BUT . . . they pulled a surprise out of the bag . . . 
and trailed the championship W. and L. team . . . 
to take second place from State . . . which had 
trounced them earlier in the season. . . . 



270 




FRESHMEN SPORTS 



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1935 Freshman Squad 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 



LITTLE FIVE CROWN 

For the second consecutive year . . . the Duke 
Frosh gridders won the Little Five championship 
. . . defeating Oak Ridge . . . swamping Wake 
Forest . . . overcoming N. C. State . . . romping 
over Davidson . . . and eking out a victory over 
the fighting Tar Babies. 

They registered 107 points to their opponents six. 
. . . Assisting head coach Hershel Caldwell to 
mould the championship Imp aggregation were . . . 
backfield coach Horace Hendrickson . . . and line 
coach Tom Rogers . . . both ex-Devil gridmen. 

FIRST PERFORMANCE 

The Imps gave the first account of themselves . . . 
downing a visiting Oak Ridge team, 13 to ... in 
a game that showed their possibilities . . . but in 
which they showed little of the form that made them 
champions. . . . Don Petrey and Bob O'Mara raced 
into the promised land once each . . . and Clay 
Nixon booted the 13th point. 

IMPS ANNIHILATE DEACS 

Next . . . they piled up 40 markers over Wake 
Forest's Yearling eleven . . . who were able to 
pass for a lone tally. . . . The first string steam- 
rollered to 20 points in five minutes . . . and the 
subs got their chance to prove their prowess. . . . 
Bill Bailey . . . Dan (Red) Hill ... Bob Spangler. 
. . . Ken Lovell . . . and Bob O'Mara ... all car- 
ried the pigskin over. . . . The lone Deac score 
came when Fuller snared a pass over the double 
stripe. 

WOLF CUBS OUTFOUGHT 

Heralded as the best freshman grid team in North 
Carolina ... the N. C. State Frosh . . . were 
nevertheless unable to cope with the onslaught of the 
determined Caldwell eleven . . . result, a 14-0 win 
for the Imps. . . . Both touchdowns came via 80- 



yard drives ... a lateral. . . . Tipton-to-Maze-to- 
Spangler gave the first six-pointer with Lovell cross- 
ing the final chalk mark for the second. . . . Willie 
Mize and Clay Nixon each hit the cross-bars for an 
extra point. . . . The spectacular all-round playing 
of Eric, "Speedboy," Tipton and Ken Lovell were 
the features of the afternoon in the Raleigh stadium. 

IMPS RAIN PASSES 

The following Saturday afternoon . . . the Imps 
took the Wild Kittens of Davidson over . . . 33-0. 
. . . The feature of the fray was the Gross-to-Wallace 
passing combination. . . . Johnny Gross, Jesse 
Quinn, and Wallace accounted for the Duke touch- 
downs . . . the Imps were on their way to their 
second consecutive crown. 

SAME OLD STORY 

The annual Duke-Carolina freshman game . . . 
this time played at Carolina . . . proved itself the 
same old story . . . two teams battling their hearts 
out in a traditional tilt. . . . Carolina took the lime- 
light the first half. . . . BUT ... the Imps came, 
back strong. . . . Bob Haas and Clay Nixon blocked 
a Carolina punt . . . Nixon fell on the bounding 
pigskin behind the Tar Heels' goal line and the 0-0 
tie was broken . . . Nixon converted giving Duke 
the 7-0 victory . . . and with it the Big Five crown. 

TWENTY-EIGHT NUMERALS 

At the conclusion of the season, the following men 
were awarded numerals: Fred Yorke, Al Russell, 
Robert O'Mara, Alex Chatham, William Shoemaker, 
Eric Tipton, Ken Lovell, Bill Bailey, John Gross, Bill 
Wallace, Al Carpenter, Bill Jessup, Carl Ayers, 
Edward Martz, Tom Riggs, Seymour Robinson, Robert 
Spangler, Walter Rogerson, Dan Hill, Robert Ala- 
baster, Robert Haas, Donald Petrey, Jack Lange, 
Robert Baskerville, Claiborne Nixon, Jesse Quinn, 
Robert Ward, and James Bowen. 



272 




1935 Basketball Squad 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 



BIG FIVE CHAMPIONS 

Starting the 1935-36 season with a 25-17 win over 
a strong Newport News High School five . . . Coach 
Herschel Caldwell's Blue Imp cagers swept through 
... to win the freshman Big Five championship of 
North Carolina. ... In the deciding game . . . the 
Imps trimmed the N. C. State yearlings . . . 30-26. 

After winning sixteen straight tilts . . . the Imps 
dropped their final game of the season ... to a 
hard-fighting Baby Deac quint of Wake Forest . . . 
the score of this tussle . . . which had no bearing 
on the championship . . . was 34-29. 

The Blue Imp victory string contained the scalps 
of Newport News High, 25-17 . . . Raleigh High, 
41-26 . . . Wake Forest frosh (first game), 32-29 
. . . Greenville High, 36-19 . . . Oak Ridge Mili- 
tary Academy, 41-28 . . . Irwin Red Birds, 43-19 
. . . Durham High, 28-20 . . . N. C. State Wolflets 
(first game), 42-35 . . . V. P. I. freshmen, 31-16 . . . 
Belmont Abby, 43-13 . . . Newport News Training 
School, 37-16 . . . Newport News High (second 



game), 35-24 . . . William and Mary frosh, 39-28 
. . . Morristown High, of Tennessee, 27-19 . . . 
N. C. State yearlings (second game), 40-18 . . . 
North Carolina freshmen, 30-26 . . . Wake Forest 
frosh (second game), 34-29. 

During this very successful season ... a number 
of Coach Herschel Caldwell's Imps put on excellent 
floor exhibitions . . . but outstanding throughout the 
season were the performances of . . . Johnny Logan, 
sterling guard . . . Bob O'Mara, high-scoring for- 
ward ... Ed Swindell and John Thomas, forward 
and guard respectively, and former Durham high 
school hardwood stars . . . and John Minor, the 
elongated Blue Imp center. 

At the conclusion of the season . . . numerals 
were awarded to twelve members of the freshman 
squad: John Logan, . . . Robert O'Mara, ... Ed 
Swindell, . . . John Thomas, . . . Walter Finn, . . . 
R. M. Frosberg, . . . Walter Kerr, . . . Maurice Loh- 
man, . . . Richard Gingland, . . . John Minor, . . . 
Herbert Phillips, . . . and Russell Bergman. 



273 



FRESHMEN BASEBALL 



Although the 1935 Duke University freshman base- 
ball squad was not as successful as the Blue Imp 
basketball and football teams, it tallied nine victories 
out of sixteen engagements for a mediocre season. 

. . The Imp victories were scored against the 
freshman nine of Wake Forest . . . North Carolina 
. . . N. C. State College . . . Augusta Military 
Academy of Georgia . . . and over the high school 
teams of Durham and Petersburg. 

Standing head over shoulders above his mates . . . 
during the 1935 season . . . was Lovill (Chubby) 
Dean, a crack diamonder who excelled in pitching 
and outfielding. . . . His batting average for the 
season was slightly over the .400 mark. . . . Coach 
Jack Coombs, of the Duke varsity, was depending on 
Dean to help bolster the Blue Devil varsity nine, 
riddled by graduation, but a sudden turn of events 
saw the promising frosh baseballer tossing his lot in 
with the Philadelphia Athletics. ... In his first year 
of professional playing, Chubby Dean has been 
making rapid strides. . . . Besides Dean, Coach 
Herschel Caldwell had an able hurler in Dave Smith 
and a good catcher in Hans Wagner. 



In one of the best freshman games of the North 
Carolina Big Five League . . . Duke yearlings 
defeated the N. C. State first year players, 1-0 . . . 
with Lovill Dean hurling a no-hit, no-run game. 

After opening their season with a 11-4 defeat at 
the hands of the strong Oak Ridge Military Academy 
diamonders . . . the Blue Imps smacked a 4-3 win 
over the Baby Deacs of Wake Forest . . . N. C. 
State was next to fall, I-O . . . Durham high School 
was swamped, 22-4. The Cadets of Augusta Mil- 
itary Academy eked out a 6-5 win from the Imps with 
Wake Forest following suit, 5-4 . . . N. C. State was 
again humbled, 3-2 and Wake Forest being defeated 
in succession, 9-2, 5-4. . . . Petersburg High nine 
of Virginia was the next victim of the Imps, 10-9. 
... In their next game with the N. C. State yearlings, 
the Imps dropped a 1 1-5 verdict when the Wolf lets 
banged across seven runs in the seventh inning to 
sew-up the game . . . the next Duke-N. C. State 
game went to the 'mps, 5-4. ... Of the three games 
played between the Duke and the North Carolina 
frosh, the Tar Babies won the first two but the Imps 
came back strong ... in their final game of the 
year to register an 8-7 win. 



274 




INTRAMURALS 




INTRAMURALS 



Intramurals at Duke had their birth five years ago 
. . . when Wallace Wade . . . believing that intra- 
murals have a definite place in the program of educa- 
tion . . . brought Kenneth C. Gerard from the 
University ot Illinois ... to take charge of the infant 
program . . . which has since grown to rival any in 
the country. 

The opportunity offered to such a large group of 
students . . . has been a prime factor in its rapid 
rise ... to a position rivaling even the varsity 
sports. . . . Established to bring out the gualities of 
fair play . . . cooperation . . . respect . . . sacri- 
fice . . . and loyalty. . . . The program has this 
year enlisted more than 1,500 men ... in the wide 
variety of athletic eliminations and tournaments. 
. . . More than 2,400 entries have been made . . . 
showing the extensive participation of many men. 



During the 1935-36 season . . 
Touch football . . . Basketball . 
Wrestling . . . Fall track . . 
Swimming . . . Water polo . . 
Horseshoes . . . Spring tennis 
ball . . . Spring track . . . and Golf contests gave 
every Duke man a chance to participate in his 
favorite sports. 

The program which celebrates its fifth birthday 



Fall tennis . . . 
. . Boxing . . . 

Handball . . . 
Volleyball . . . 

. , Playground 



in 1936 is definitely growing . . . and is encouraged 
to continue to expand. . . . The gymnasium in use 
at present was originally intended for use only as 
an intramurals gym . . . showing the plans of the 
administration for this branch of Duke athletics. . . . 
A varsity gymnasium was intended to be built on the 
present Freshman baseball diamond. 

Interest in the intramurals program has received 
much of its intensity from the rivalry between the 
Greek organizations . . . which expend great 
energy on their teams . . . and regard the ribbons 
and cups highly. . . . The freshman houses also 
enter teams and often develop unusual rivalry . . . 
although not as continually as the fraternities. . . . 
In addition to the team awards which are coveted by 
organizations ... on the campus . . . the many 
individual awards ... for instance, in . . . boxing 
and wrestling . . . are vigorously fought for by the 
contestants . . . who enjoy competition ... as well 
and as much as their big brothers on the varsity 
teams. 

Coach Carl Voyles . . . varsity track coach . . . 
and assistant football coach . . . was a prime factor 
in the institution of the present system of intramural 
competition when he came from the University of 
Illinois five years ago. 



276 







INTRAMURALS 



An unusually full program of intramural competi- 
tion . . . gave to every student on the Duke campus 
... a chance to demonstrate his ability and enjoy 
the sports of his choice. ... It also gave the varsity 
coaches a chance to watch the students . . . and 
select those with possibilities of developing into 
first-string material. 

Working under Coach Jerry Gerard . . . through 
the intramurals office ... a staff of house athletic 
representatives provided the contact between the 
administration and the participants in the tourna- 
ments. . . . The representatives were elected at the 
beginning of the year by the students of each dormi- 
tory or fraternity. 

The first event of the season was a touch football 
league which aroused an unusual amount of interest 
. . . and saw Kappa Sigma fraternity and House P 
sharing the University championship . . . Sigma 
Chi won the blue ribbon place in its division. 

Kappa Sigma again proved its sports prowess in 
spring track . . . when a team representing it won 
the first place. ... In the individual scoring, how- 
ever, Clark, an independent, was first . . . Stephen- 
son, independent, second . . . and Griffin, Hauser 
and H. Moore ... all frosh tracksters . . . third. 



The pugilistic instincts of the Duke students were 
then catered to in a boxing loop which, perhaps, 
drew the most interest of all the events. . . . Besides 
a large enrollment in the loop . . . the large audi- 
ences that saw the fights filled the small boxing room 
to overflowing every night. 

Kappa Sigma again took the first team place. In 
the 115-pound class . . . Russo, Southgate . . . won, 
and in 125 . . . Morelock, K. S. . . . placed first 
. . . with two more Kappa Sigs . . . Gannon and 
Blalock first in the 135 and 145 respectively . . . and 
three Southgate men taking the heavier weights 
. . . Poerner, 155 . . . Truit, 165 . . . and Washer, 
175 .. . and Glenn, representing Epworth winning 
the unlimited class. The runners-up starting with 
115 were . . . Der Tatavasian . . . Gillis . . . 
Groves . . . Ardolino . . . Melrum . . . Ross 
. . . Morris . . . and Champion. 

After a long campaign ... a tennis tournament, 
which started the new semester, ended with Graeber 
at the top of the singles heap . . . and the Beich- 
Taylor combination in the doubles lead. . . . Follow- 
ing Graeber were Beich and Hulme . . . and second 
in doubles competition . . . were Seeberg and Staley. 



277 



^^\^»On Of: 




Book Five 



ORGANIZATIONS 




LEAK, sand-swept 
rocks . . . towering mountain 
peaks . . . expansive fields of 
native Rhododendron . . . saintly 
shepherds and their tiny flocks 
. . . rustic, ancestral log houses, 
passed on from father to son 
through generations of hardy, 
unhurried mountaineers . . . are 
but a few of the simple and 
impressive beauties that reward 
the visitor to the "Little Switzer- 
land" of North Carolina. 



XT^S^*^ 







From a Photograph by Bayard Wootten 




FRATERNITIES 




FRATERNITY PAN-HELLENIC 
COUNCIL 




Jim McCall 
President 



The belief that the best interests of Greek-letter 
fraternities of Duke University, with respect both to 
our individual chapters and to the general organiza- 
tions, would be fostered by the organization and 
functioning of a body of duly constituted repre- 
sentatives from the various active chapters at Duke 
was the basis for the organization of the Pan-Hellenic 
Council. 

The Council is composed of one representative 
from each of the local and national fraternities repre- 
sented on the Duke campus. After serving one year 
as a junior representative, the member is well trained 
for his responsibilities as senior member. 

The Pan-Hellenic Council sponsors several impor- 
tant dances each year, with both local and outside 
orchestras. Frank Dailey played for the fall series, 
and the spring dances featured Jimmie Lunceford. 
These dances are important elements of the social 
life at Duke. 

Serving as a common meeting ground on which 
the various problems of fraternities are discussed 
and performing regulatory duties in matters relating 
to rushing, pledging, and initiation of men are very 
important functions of the Council. The deferred 
rushing system was introduced to the fraternity system 
at Duke two years ago. In connection with this 
system, a "C" average reguirement for one semester's 
work for rushees was established. Slight modi- 
fications have been made since the inauguration of 
the deferred rushing plan. 



Puryear 


Kunkle Beneke 


Abbott 


Schafer 


Hale Winton 


Daniel 


Hathorn 


Richardson Dein 


Henry 


Weinstein 


Morelock Hiatt 
Plump 


Moss 




284 



SORORITY PAN-HELLENIC 
COUNCIL 



Souder Applewhite Ivey Winfree 

Morton Peterson Slater Lins 

Forness Lentz Larzelere Ritchie 

Rogan Faires Buice Plyler 

Meetze Fogel Sasscer Clarke 





June Langfitt 
President 



The Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, the governing 
body of intersorority activities, is composed of two 
representatives from each of the eleven sororities. 
These girls are selected by their respective groups. 
Officers on the council rotate from year to year, thus 
avoiding unnecessary rivalry. The Council makes 
and enforces rules concerning rushing, pledging, and 
initiation of al! girls. 

At the end of each year the Council formulates new 
rushing rules based on those of preceding years, but 
with those changes which the Council considers will 
be advantageous to the sororities and the student 
body as a whole. 

During the past summer the old Crowell Science 
building was converted into a Sorority Pan-Hellenic 
House, and there the sororities have had social 
functions throughout the year. The Council spon- 
sored a Pan-Hellenic dance this year which was 
enjoyed by everyone. 

A scholarship cup is awarded semiannually to the 
sorority having the highest scholastic average for 
the preceding semester. Each year, the Council 
awards a scholarship of $100 to some senior. This 
award is based on the grades of the Junior year and 
the first semester of the Senior year. 

Eleven National sororities are represented on the 
campus, and the Council feels that in the future a 
closer cooperation will bind them together more and 
more. The new house has done much to foster a 
better spirit among all of the sorority members. 



"SF^i^^^- ^/iii'^ 



285 



ALPHA TAU OMEGA 



Class of 1936 

Edwin B. Abbott, Birmingham, Ala.; Ernest Cruik" 
shank, Raleigh, N. C.; O. Lawrence Dortch, Columbia. 
Tenn.; A. Carl Lee, Jr., Charlotte, N. C; John R- 
McCrary, Lexington, N. C; D. Cole McMartin, Jr., 
Des Moines, Iowa; James W. Ouzts, Marion, N. C; 
W. James Turpit, Hastings, Neb.; John M. Webb, 
Durham, N. C. 



Class of 1938 

Edward P. A. Beard, Rockville, Md.; Albert G. 
Clay, Mt. Sterling, Ky.; Leroy Eakin, Jr., Washington, 
D. C; N. A. Perry, Jr., Perry Park, Ky.; Robert E. 
Ricker, Elizabethtown, Pa.; Clyde S. Rine, Jr., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa.; Arthur B. Rouse, Jr., Erlanger, Ky.; 
James G. Shilliday, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Class of 1937 

H. N. Ashby, Durham, N. C; Robert T. Bean, 
Louisville, Ky.; Arthur B. Bradsher, Jr., Montreal, 
Canada; W. Thornton Green, Jr., Louisville, Ky.; 
P. H. Hanes, Jr., Winston-Salem, N. C; William 
Champe Jennings, Westfield, N. J.; Knight Laird, 
Memphis, Tenn.; Charles E. Pruitt, Frederick, Md.; 
William H. Sellers, Anniston, Ala.; Thomas F. 
Southgate, Jr., Durham, N. C; W. Robert Williams, 
Laurel, Del.; Robert C. Wood, Lewisburg, W. Va. 



Pledges 

Alec Chatham, Jr., Elkin, N. C; John F. Cree, 
Sunbury, Pa.; Robert C. Gatewood, Mt. Sterling, Ky.; 
M. Bickford Long, Roxboro, N. C; Alex N. Mclnnis, 
Gulf Hammock, Fla.; Howard P. Mason, Hollywood, 
Cal.; Phillip Mitchell, II, Rock Island, 111.; Harlan H. 
Olson, La Grange, 111.; John S. Perry, Rocky Mount, 
N. C; Robert Radtke, Detroit, Mich.; Thomas P. Senff, 
Mt. Sterling, Ky.; Howard J. Whitaker, Windsor, 
Conn. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 94; Number of alumni associations, 71; Total membership, 31,010; A. T. O. 
founded, September II, 1865; Xi at Duke, March 2, 1872; Colors, sky-blue and gold; Flower, white tea rose; 
Publication, The Palm. 

HISTORY 

Alpha Tau Omega was the first fraternity established after the Civil War. Founded at Richmond, 
Virginia, by three young Confederate soldiers, it was projected as a national organization which should know 
no bounds, and the first chapter was placed at Virginia Military Institute. 

The fraternity now extends among college groups in forty-four states, and was the first Southern fra- 
ternity to maintain successfully chapters in the North. 

The first fraternity to become incorporated, it was granted a charter in 1879 by the Supreme Court of 
Maryland, at the instance of the fraternity members assembled in Congress at Baltimore. A. T. O. has been 
a member of the Inter-Fraternity Conference since the initial meeting of that body. 

Xi Chapter is the oldest fraternity on the Duke campus. It was the ninth Alpha Tau Omega Chapter 
to be established, and is now the fourth oldest in the order of existing ones. Originally North Carolina Alpha 
Chapter, the name was changed to Xi in 1890, at the end of the anti-fraternity period at Trinity. 



286 




P).9''.9>'09-Z 




Dortch 


McCrary 


Ouzts 


Cruikshank 


Abbott 


Webb 


Bean 


Southgate 


McMartin 


Turpit 


Lee 


Laird 


Wood 


Hanes 


Williams 


Jennings 


Pruitt 


Shilliday 


Green 


Ashby 


Beard 


Bradsher 


Ricker 


Rine 


Eakin 




Rouse 


Clay 


Perry 





.€).<!).^.©.© 



'\ 



287 



KAPPA SIGMA 



Class of 1936 

Een Blalock, Raleigh, N. C; W. P. Budd, Durham, 
N. C; Al Burford, Texarkana, Texas; George Failing, 
Luke, Md.; George Griscom, Trenton, N. J.; William 
Huiskamp, Keokuk, Iowa; Francis Litle, Washington, 
Pa.; Richard McAninch, Marion, Ohio; George 
Morelock, Nashville, Tenn.; Jack Paist, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Boyd Pierson, Caribou, Maine; Duncan Sellers, 
Norfolk, Va.; Garfield Shafer, Norfolk, Va. 



Class of 1937 

Wayne Ambler, Abington, Pa.; George Bailey, 
Lynbrook, N. Y.; Floyd Bennett, Richmond, Va.; Jess 
Brundage, Upland, Pa.; Peter Callahan, New York, 
N. Y.; Stephen Fuller, Chevy Chase, Md.; J. J. 
Gibbons, Wilson, N. C; Robert Hinck, Short Hills, 
N. J.; Grant Horneffer, Westfield, N. J.; Carl Huis- 
kamp, Keokuk, Iowa; Jack Kneipp, Washington, 



D. C; Oscar McFadyen, Fayetteville, N. C; Harry 
Morris, Chester, Pa.; Arthur Petersen, Lynbrook, 
N. Y.; Ryland Scott, Detroit, Mich.; Robert Stewart, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Class of 1938 

Oliver Brundage, Upland, Pa.; Carl Franz, York, 
Pa.; Roy Fleming, Wenonah, N. J.; Philip Gillis, 
Arlington, N. J.; James Little, Raleigh, N. C; A. Ber- 
tram Rohrbaugh, Chevy Chase, Md.; Elmer Rouzer, 
Hagerstown, Md.; J. Edward Sundholm, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

Pledges 

John Carpenter, Hague, N. Y.; Braxton Craven, 
Chariotte, N. C; Robert Finn, Palmyra, N. J.; Paul 
Gannon, Glen Rock, N. J.; Walter James, Washington, 
D. C; Curtis Jones, Greenlawn, N. Y.; Garfield 
Miller, Coral Gables, Fla.; Richard Stull, Washing- 
ton, D. C; Sidney Truesdale, Asheboro, N. C; 
John Wilkes, Trenton, N. J. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 107; Number of alumni chapters, none officially; Total membership, 36,051; 
Kappa Sigma founded, December 10, 1869; Eta Prime at Duke, 1873; Colors, scarlet, white, and emerald-green; 
Flower, lily-of-the-valley; Publication, The Caduceus. 

HISTORY 

The University of Virginia campus was the scene for the founding of Kappa Sigma. The founders are 
known in its literature and traditions as "the five friends and brothers." During the first years the members 
were noted for their high social status in the South. Kappa Sigma was the first southern fraternity to attempt 
northern expansion. There are now chapters in forty-five states and one in Canada. 

Kappa Sigma at first followed a policy of direct establishment of chapters, and it was nearly fourteen 
years before a chapter was established from a local society. 

The fraternity maintains funds for keeping in close touch with individuals and chapters. Scholarship 
is stressed. The patriotic sense is embodied in the fraternal order, and each chapter displays an American 
flag. 

Eta Prime of Kappa Sigma ranks second on the campus in point of age. It also has the distinction ol 
being the third Kappa Sigma chapter. Since the establishment of an intramural sports department here, 
the Duke Kappa Sigs have been outstanding. 



288 



■^^ 1^^ 

^^:ii;i. 






Failing 


Litle 


W.Huiskamp 


Sellers 


Shafer 


Griscom 


More lock 


McAninch 


Fuller 


Gibbons 


Budd 


Hinck 


Horneffer 


Callahan 


McFadyen 


Paist 


Petersen 


Morris 


Ambler 


Scott 


Stewart 


Gillis 


Little 


Rohrbaugh 




Fl 


eming O. 


Brundage 



Blalock 

J. Brundage 

Kneipp 

Sundholm 

Franz 

Rouzer 



289 



PHI DELTA THETA 



Class of 1936 

William Few, Durham, N. C; Gilbert L. Keith, 
Wilmette, III; Clifford W. Perry, Winston-Salem, 
N. C; William F. Reavis, Waycross, Ga.; W. P. 
Ricks, Rocky Mount, N. C; Daniel B. Schafer, Fort 
Wayne, Ind.; Frank Sizemore, High Point, N. C; 
William E. Woodruff, Winston -Salem, N. C. 



Class of 1937 

Horace Barber, Glen Falls, N. Y.; Robert Boeker 
Seymour, Conn.; Curtis Collins, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Harry Etter, Shippensburg, Pa.; Charles Hallock 
Nunda, N. Y.; Albert Happel, Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 
Albert Jacobs, Germantown, Pa.; Roy R. Johnson, 
Upton, Mass.; James Lambeth, Thomasville, N. C. 
Kenneth Podger, Kenmore, N. Y.; Joseph Riley 
Collingdale, Pa.; William Smoot, Seaford, Del. 
William Womble, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Class of 1938 

Emil Beyer, White Plains, N. Y.; Paull Boger, 
Morganton, N. C; James Colson, Brunswick, Ga.; 



Robert Doyle, Washington, D. C; Fred Edwards 
Bloomsburg, Pa.; L. M. Edwards, Durham, N. C. 
Nathaniel Ewing, Vincennes, Ind.; Elmore Hackney 
Durham, N. C; Herbert Hudgins, Norfolk, Va. 
William Lampe, Harrisburg, Pa.; Jack Lockwood 
Verona, N. J.; Parker Naudain, Haddon Heights, N. J. 
Dick Ritter, Vineland, N. J.; Robert Scanlan, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Malcolm Stokes, Savannah, Ga.; Stephen 
Van Lill, III, Baltimore, Md. 



Pledges 

Don Bard, Pleasantville, N. Y.; Elmer Drake, 
Roselle Park, N. J.; Kenneth Few, Durham, N. C; 
Jay Gaines, Evanston, 111.; Robert Haas, New York, 
N. Y.; Alton Haring, Hackensack, N. J.; Ben Horack, 
Durham, N. C; Hill Hudson, Shelby, N. C; Gene 
Keefe, Sioux City, Iowa; Ralph Lambeth, Thomas- 
ville, N. C; Wilbert Lyons, Ridgewood, N. J.; Herman 
Rumsey, Atlanta, Ga.; Clarence Simmons, Rockville 
Centre, N. Y.; Robert Weichel, Scranton, Pa.; 
Daniel Will, Drexel Hill, Pa.; Howard Winterson, 
Oradell, N. J. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 106; Number of alumni clubs, 146; Total membership, 42,772; Phi Delta 
Theta founded, December 26, 1848; N. C. Alpha at Duke, 1878, May, 1926; Colors, azure and argent; Flower, 
white carnation; Publication, The Scroll. 

HISTORY 

The founding of Phi Delta Theta was at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, the fraternity being one of the 
members of the celebrated "Triad." At present Phi Delta Theta has about the largest number of initiates 
and the widest Canadian expansion of any fraternity. 

It was intended in the beginning that the fraternity extend to other institutions, and this policy was 
entered upon forthwith. Before the opening of the Civil War a sound foundation for growth had been laid, 
although the hostilities checked further development. 

In the history of Phi Delta Theta is the only instance of bicameral fraternity chapters. This was an 
exigency of the sub rosa nature of the chapters at anti-fraternity institutions. 

North Carolina Alpha chapter, the third oldest national fraternity at Duke, has had two periods of existence. 
The first ended in 1879, when all fraternities were banned at Trinity. The second period began when the 
local body, Epsilon Alpha Sigma, was granted a charter and the original name in 1926. 



290 





Perry- 


Sizemore 


Schafer 


Ricks 


Woodruff 


Keith 


Podger 




Etter 


Johnson 


Boeker 


Lambeth 


Riley 




Smoot 


Womble 


Barber 


Jacobs 


Collins 




Hallock 


Hackney 


F. Edwards 


Beyer 


Doyle 




Van Lill 


Lockwood 


Colson 


Scanlon 


Lampe 




Ewing 


Naudain 


Stokes 




L. 


Ed 


wards Boc 


ler 





291 



KAPPA ALPHA 



Class of 1936 

Charles P. Ballenger, Greenville, S. C; William F. 
Bowman, Aberdeen, N. C; Robert Burge, Westfield, 
N. J.; William A. Lewis, Durham, N. C; Jim McCall, 
Oklahoma City, Okla.; Philip M. Russell, Durham, 
N. C; Walter A. Smith, W. New Brighton, N. Y.; 
Ernest C. Swiger, Clarksburg, W. Va. 



Class of 1937 

Philip R. Cook, Pasadena, Cal.; William B. Farrar, 
Summerville, Ga.; Charles H. Gill, Newport, R. I.; 
Robert Lyon Jones, Murfreesboro, Tenn.; Archer 
Lackey, Christiansburg, Va.; Richard H. Owen, 
Clarksville, Va.; John R. Pepper, Memphis, Tenn.; 
Herbert J. Upchurch, Durham, N. C; William B. 
Wright, Raleigh, N. C. 



Class of 1938 

Robert R. Beatty, Charlotte, N. C; John O. McCoy, 
Glen Jean, W. Va.; Dexter McCaskill, Marianna, Fla.; 
Pennington M. Nixon, Rome, Ga.; Robert R. Patillo, 
Atlanta, Ga.; Fredrick Rebman, Courtland, Ala.; 
Thomas S. Ryon, Washington, D. C. 

Pledges 

Ellis T. Baker, Baltimore, Md.; Jack C. Barnes, 
Greensboro, N. C; Frank T. Gerard, Grenada, Miss.; 
Walter C. Johnson, Chattanooga, Tenn.; John W. 
Johnston, Roanoke, Va.; Charles E. Landreth, Win- 
ston-Salem, N. C; Reid Mitchell, Washington, N. C; 
Clinton W. Morgan, Jr., Lombard, 111.; Matt. B. 
Murfree, Murfreesboro, Tenn.; Paul E. Paredes, San 
Pedro Sula, Honduras; John R. Parsons, Murfreesboro, 
Tenn.; Woodard F. Russell, Durham, N. C; William E. 
Singletary, Winston-Salem, N. C; Robert L. Sloan, 
Waynesville, N. C; Robert B. Ward, Baltimore, Md.; 
Henry K. Warth, Baltimore, Md. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 67; Number of alumni chapters, 87; Total membership, 25,492; Kappa 
Alpha founded, December 21, 1865; Alpha Phi at Duke, October 18, 1901; Colors, crimson and old gold; 
Flowers, magnolia and red rose; Publication, The Kappa Alpha Journal. 

HISTORY 

The Southern Order of Kappa Alpha, in contradiction to the smaller fraternity of that name which exists 
principally in the North, was founded at Washington College before that institution became Washington 
and Lee University. 

The aim of the founders was to preserve the basic southern characteristics, other than sectional, in a 
fraternity confined to the southern states. The three chapters in California form the main exception to this 
principle. As far as individual membership is concerned, statehood is not a restriction. Indeed, the alumni 
associations are nation-wide in scope. 

Kappa A.lpha was not so fortunate in its infancy as some other fraternal organizations, for in many 
institutions where chapters were placed, anti-fraternity legislation shortly went into effect. Thus, it was left 
to a small nucleus of chapters working together to effect its permanent organization. 

Alpha Phi chapter is the fourth oldest fraternity on Duke campus. It was organized soon after the edict 
against fraternities here was repealed by the Trinity College Board of Trustees. 



292 





Ballenger 

McCall 

Smith 

Gill 

Upchurch 



Pepper 


Bowman 


Russell 


Lewis 


Lackey 


Rebman 


Burge 


Beatty 


Ryon 


Swiger 


Jones 


McCaskill 


Farrar 


McCoy 
Nixon 


Parades 



293 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 



Class of 1936 

Henry Harris, Albemarle, N. C; Hyatt Mossburg, 
Chevy Chase, Md.; George Nance, Asheville, N. C; 
Douglas Richardson, Ashland, Ky.; Thornton Ruther- 
ford Charlotte, N. C; Cecil A. Williams, Chicago, 111. 



Class of 1938 

Eugene Bailey, Fort Wayne, Ind.; Russell Cooke, 
Kenilworth, 111.; Robert Hollowell, Hertford, N. C; 
Warner Hutchinson, La Grange, 111.; Richard Kale, 
Troutman, N. C; loseph Scott, Live Oak, Fla. 



Class of 1937 

Arthur Clay, Indianapolis, Ind.; Robert Hall, 
Charleston, W. Va.; William Hinnant, Raleigh, N. C; 
Harry Horton, Albemarle, N. C; Brooks McElwrath, 
Mayfield, Ky.; lames O'Brien, Rochester, N. Y.; 
G. Manning Smith, Charleston, W. Va.; Wilfred Thorn- 
ton, Macon, Ga. 



Pledges 

Campbell Garden, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Howard 
Eager, Washington, D. C; Willis Holding, Raleigh, 
N. C; James McGimsey, Morganton, N. C.; George 
Ray, Charlotte, N. C; Robert Ross, Baltimore, Md.; 
George Stone, Worcester, Mass.; Dennis Williams, 
Richmond, Va. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 78; Number of alumni chapters, 82; Total membership, 19,000; Pi Kappa 
Alpha founded. May 1, 1868; Alpha Alpha at Duke, Novem.ber 26, 1901; Colors, garnet and old gold. Flower, 
lily-of-the-valley; Publication, The Shield and Diamond. 

HISTORY 

Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, founded at the University of Virginia, was the outcome of the close friendship 
of five men who served together in the Confederate Army, notably in the Battle of New Market. 

The initial chapter was the governing authority for some years, granting charters, installing chapters, 
and determining policies. The Pi Kappa Alpha convention of 1889 limited expansion to the southern states, 
so as to further a concentrated development. Later the field was opened to include the southwestern states, 
and has since been broadened to permit growth throughout the United States. 

One of the chapters possesses a unigue meeting place. It is a replica of a Pueblo Indian council 
chamber and is located on the University of New Mexico campus, only initiates being permitted entrance. 

Pi Kappa Alpha has an intricate organization which extends even to each individual member and pledge, 
including a uniform pledging ceremony, a form examination, and numerous awards. Alpha Alpha chapter 
is fifth in age among the fraternities at Duke. 



294 




Harris Mossburg Richardson Rutherford 

McElwrath Hall Nance Kale 

O Bnen Thornton Cooke Bailey 

Hutchinson Hollowell Clay 



295 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON 



Class of 1936 

Richard R. Conradi, Irvington, N. J.; Lewis O. 
Funkhouser, Hagerstown, Md.; John R. Hathorn, 
Ballston Springs, N. Y.; John W. Hulme, Jr., Jackson 
Heights, N. Y.; Frank E. Mazuy, Newton, N. J.; 
James B. Messick, Smyrna, Del.; William A. Sager, 
Hagerstown, Md.; Roy Z. Thomas, Jr., Rock Hill, 
S. C; Kenneth D. Weagley, Waynesboro, Pa.; 
Frederick C. Wright, Jr., Hagerstown, Md. 



Class of 1938 

Robert H. Black, Montclair, N. J.; J. O. Funkhouser, 
Jr., Hagerstown, Md.; Edward W. Isom, Jr., Scarsdale, 
N. Y.; John C. Mansell, Maplewood, N. J.; William 
Marshall, Vinton, Va.; Thomas C. Sager, Hagerstown, 
Md.; Donald V. Schworer, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Harold D. 
Von Glahn, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Remsen W. Walker, 
Tarrytown, N. Y.; T. Preston Webster, Jr., Tappa- 
hannock, Va. 



Class of 1937 

Frederick Clark, Maplewood, N. J.; Walter A. 
Cosgrove, Southampton, N. Y.; Robert L. Cowan, 
Newport, Tenn.; Albert W. Fletcher, Scarsdale, N. Y.; 
Roger K. Harris, Newport, Ark.; Gerald T. McMaster, 
Overbrook, Pa.; Richard A. Patterson, Glens Falls, 
N. Y.; Hambleton Slingluff, Jr., West Hartford, Conn.; 
Haddon H. Smith, Maplewood, N. J.; Henry G. 
Sullivan, Anderson, S. C; Robert L. Weston, Ken- 
sington, Md. 



Pledges 

J. Carlyle Burton, Wilson, N. C; Peter Coppedge, 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio; Leroy Duncan, Jr., Norfolk, 
Va.; Richard Goode, Newton, Mass.; Thomas Grimm, 
South Orange, N. J.; William Hulme, Jackson Heights, 
N. Y.; Edward Ingles, Great Neck, N. Y.; Robert 
Kennedy, Montclair, N. J.; George Morrow, Jr., 
Scarsdale, N. Y.; William Neikirk, Hagerstown, Md.; 
Frank Perrell, Miami, Fla.; Cristopher Webster, 
Tappahannock, Va. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 68; Number of alumni chapters, 25; Total membership, 16,862; Sigma Phi 
Epsilon founded, November, 1901; North Carolina Gamma at Duke, 1909; Colors, red and violet; Flowers, 
American Beauty rose and violet; Publication, The Sigma Phi Epsilon Journal. 

HISTORY 

Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity was founded at Richmond College, now the University of Richmond, from 
a local society called the Saturday Night Club. During its first two years the parent chapter encountered a 
great deal of opposition, both sarcastic and even directly hostile in character, from members of the college 
community. The fraternity, however, has managed to survive and expand rapidly, until now its scope is 
nation-wide. 

The early chapters were formed for the express purpose of joining Sigma Phi Epsilon. The granting of 
charters to local petitioning bodies has been the most frequent method of inception for the later chapters. 

A remarkable innovation is the "Sigma Phi Epsilon Plan of Finance." Under this system the financial 
affairs of all the chapters are administered by their alumni. It has relieved the undergraduate of a consid- 
erable burden and has proved profitable in cases where there has previously been loss. 

North Carolina Gamma chapter, sixth in age of nationals here, was installed from the local group. Beta Nu. 



296 




Thomas 


Conradi 


Hathorn 


W. Sager 


Messick 


Weagley 


Mazuy 


Wright 


Sulhvan 


Hulme 


L. Funkhouser 


Smith 


SHngluff 


Fletcher 


Clark 


Cosgrove 


Weston 


Harris 


Marshall 


T. Sager 


Cowan 


Patterson 


Walker 


Webster 


Schworer 



Von Glahn J. Funkhouser Mansell 




297 



SIGMA CHI 



Class of 1936 

William G. Crawford, Detroit, Mich.; Alexander D. 
Deemer, II, Brockville, Pa.; H. Grady Hardin, Colum- 
bia, S. C; Frederic R. Keator, Wayne, Pa.; Charles W. 
Kunkle, Jr., Johnstown, Pa.; David W. Lamb, Ro- 
chester, N. Y.; John E. Mann, Jr., Greenwood, Miss.; 
Thomas C. Parsons, Altoona, Pa.; William H. Rue, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



Class of 1937 

John C. Ardolino, Metuchen, N. J.; W. Sperring 
Beck, Beverly, N. J.; Robert C. Gillander, Pittsburgh, 
Pa.; Albert L. Herrick, Lebanon, Ohio; John E. 
Hoffman, Fort Wayne, Ind.; Gunther H. Ibbeken, 
Haddon Heights, N. J.; John D. Klock, Walker, N. Y.; 
Russell P. McCallum, Jamaica Plains, Mass.; Howell X. 
Rasberry, Kinston, N. C; W. Wiley Reel, West View, 
Pa.; John G. Scott, Jr., lamaqua. Pa.; W. Mason 
Shehan, Jr., Easton, Md.; Charles D. Wenrich, Wash- 
ington, D. C.; C. Edmond Wunder, Jr., Ardmore, Pa. 



Class of 1938 

Edward E. Barry, Jr., Aldan, Pa.; Thomas E. 
Bowman, Jr., Harrisburg, Pa.; Willard P. Earngey, Jr., 
Rockford, 111.; R. Eugene Hess, Fairmont, W. Va.; 
George B. Long, Harrisburg, Pa.; Richard S. Newens, 
Ithaca, N. Y.; Richard W. Northrup, Rutherford, N. J.; 
Robert M. Price, Scranton, Pa.; Leon W. Quick, 
Watertown, N. Y.; Charles C. Stauffer, Washington, 
D. C; Robert H. Stephens, Detroit, Mich.; William L. 
Stocks, Altoona, Pa.; William G. Smith, Riverton, 
N. J.; Charles A. Thomas, Glenside, Pa.; Milford P. 
Turner, Clayton, N. J.; William W. Wells, Elmira, 
N. Y.; Joseph M. White, Portsmouth, Va. 



Pledges 

Herbert N. Cheek, Durham, N. C; Robert C. 
Downs, Harrisburg, Pa.; Robert M. Lohman, Fort 
Wayne, Ind.; John T. Minor, Batavia, N. Y.; Robert 
O'Mara, Ashland, Ky.; Thomas J. Riggs, Hunting- 
ton, W. Va. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 96; Number of alumni chapters, 128; Total membership, 31,000; Sigma Chi 
founded, June 28, 1855; Beta Lambda at Duke, March, 1912; Colors, blue and old gold; Flower, white rose; 
Publication, The Magazine of Sigma Chi. 

HISTORY 

Sigma Chi is a member of the "Miami Triad" of national social fraternities that found origin at Miami 
University, Oxford, Ohio. Within six months after the mother chapter was first organized, a second chapter 
of Sigma Chi was brought into being at Ohio Wesleyan. The fraternity was incorporated in 1899 under the 
laws of Illinois as "The Grand Council of the Sigma Chi Fraternity." Its expansion throughout the United 
Slates has been effected mostly through the granting of charters to petitioning groups. 

The Magazine of Sigma Chi has gradually developed from a local journal (1881) into the publication of 
all the chapters, edited several times a year. 

Phenomenal in fraternity histories was the "Constantine chapter," composed of Sigma Chis serving in 
the Army of the Tennessee, having for its institution the Confederate Army and for its fraternal meeting- 
place the battlefield. 

Beta Lambda is seventh in age among the chapters of national fraternities at Duke. It was the sixty- 
eighth group to be chartered by Sigma Chi. 



298 





Kunkle Hardin Rue Mann 

Gillander Ibbeken Klock Lamb 



Keator Crawford 

Parsons Ardolino 



Herrick Scott Hoffman Shehan Long Bowman 

Reel Wunder Barry Beck McCallum Newens 

Thomas Wenrich Smith Stocks Turner Hess 

Northrup White Price Quick 



Stauffer Wells 



Stevens 



299 



PI KAPPA PHI 



Class of 1936 

James Martin Daniel, Henderson, N. C; Robert 
Dick, Canton, Ga.; Joseph B. Ford, Jr., Savannah, 
Ga.; Francis Rodman Landon, Clinton, N. C; William 
Oliver Luly, Vero Beach, Fla.; Frank Griffin Satter- 
field, Jr., Ehirham, N. C; Edgar Robert Stallings, 
Augusta, Ga.; John Clarence Watson, Jr., Char- 
lotte, N. C. 



Class of 1937 

George Allen Burwell, Warrenton, N. C; William 
Henry Fulmer, Savannah, Ga.; Nelson Rudolph 
Jantzen, Philadelphia, Pa.; John Cheves King, Jr., 
Charleston, W. Va.; Joseph Victor Leidy, Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Joseph Andrew Pell, Jr., Pilot Mountain, 
N. C; Charles Wesley Shuff, III, Greenville, N. C; 
Richard M. Taliaferro, Columbia, S. C; Donald Ross 
Wilson, Greenlawn, N. Y. 



Class of 1938 

Nathan Cox, Clarkton, N. C; Newton Weldon 
Edwards, Chicago, 111.; Edward William Shilling, 
Dover, Del.; Philip Arthur Small, Charlotte, N. C; 
Lloyd Flinton Timberlake, Columbia, S. C; Thomas 
Howard Timberlake, Columbia, S. C; Joseph Lake 
Williams, Easley, S. C. 

Pledges 

John B. Britton, Sumpter, S. C; Harold R. Collins, 
South Seaville, N. J.; Eugene Desvernine, Marianao, 
Havana, Cuba; Guy Elder, Jr., Charlotte, N. C; 
Fletcher N. Eure, Beaufort, N. C; John Hamilton 
Furlong, Jr., Chester, Pa.; Benjamin M. Herring, 
Greenville, N. C; Robert A. Hitch, Jacksonville, Fla.; 
Francis S. Home, Farmington, N. C; John C. Howard, 
Savannah, Ga.; Lloyd A. Kraushaar, Rochester, N. Y.; 
Wm. Campbell McLain, Columbia, S. C; William L. 
Rhodes, Jr., Estill, S. C; Landon Earle Shuff, Green- 
ville, N. C; Henry Sink, Greensboro, N. C; Edward 
Lewis Smith, Whiteville, N. C; Robert Bruce Wyman, 
Arlington, Mass. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 38; Number of alumni chapters, 22; Total membership, 6,330; Pi Kappa Plii 
founded, December 10, 1904; Mu at Duke, 1915; Colors, gold and white; Flower, red rose; Official Publication, 
The Star and Lamp. 

HISTORY 

The only national fraternity ever founded in the State of South Carolina, Pi Kappa Phi began its existence 
at the College of Charleston. Up to 1927, when anti-fraternity statutes were stricken from the body of state 
legislation, Pi Kappa Phi was faced with the stern opposition to fraternities which was the feeling among the 
educational institutions in South Carolina for about thirty years. 

Now, with thf^ changed attitude. Pi Kappa Phi has made rapid headway in its mother state. It has had 
a stea' ' lent growth outside. This has been more pronounced in the South, though not by inten- 

tion. '.' . in Pi Kappa Phi is limited to initiates, there being no honorary members. 

It IS mterestmg to note that its three founders were all warm friends from earliest school years in old 
Charleston. Their desire was to clothe their friendship in permanence, and conseguently they established 
this fraternity. 

Mu chapter at Duke ranks eighth in age among the national groups on the campus. 



300 





Watson Satterfield Luly Daniel Ford 

Stallings Dick Jantzen Taliaferro Leidy 

Wesselhoft Fulmar Burwell Pell Wilson 

King Shilling H.Timberlake L.Timberlake Shuff 

Williams Small Smith Cox 



301 



DELTA SIGMA PHI 



Class of 1936 

Charles W. Ackley, Vineland, N. J.; Henry C. 
Gillies, Jr., Melrose, Mass.; Thomas W. Herb, 
Wyomissing. Pa.; Joseph S. Hiatt, Jr., Lenoir, N. C; 
Donald M. Kramer, Reading, Pa.; Alan M. Mac- 
Quarrie, Montclair, N. J.; Robert C. Mervine, East 
Orange, N. J.; Peter E. Naktenis, Hartford, Conn.; 
Hugh A. Page, Jr., Clayton, N. C; Rufus H. Powell, 
III, Durham, N. C; Ralph L. Rockett, Gastonia, N. C; 
William T. Smithdeal, Jr., Richmond, Va.; John J. 
Shorten, Hartford, Conn.; Ted L. Stritzinger, Norris- 
town. Pa.; William W. Turner, Jr., Montclair, N. J. 



Class of 1937 

Kenneth M. Boyle, Arlington, N. J.; Willard M. 
Gillies, Melrose, Mass.; James N. Gorringe, East 
Orange, N. J.; Ernest L. Green, Jr., Media, Pa.; Harry 



B. Litterst, Arlington, N. J.; William H. Ramsey, II, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Class of 1938 

William M. Courtney, Charlotte, N. C; William N. 
Horsley, Belmont, N. C; Duncan G. Kaye, Troy, N. Y.; 
John M. Moritz, Enka, N. C; Frederick F. Smith, 
Maplewood, N. J.; James K. West, Asheville, N. C. 

Pledges 

Jack L. Barrett, Grosse Pointe, Mich.; William A. 
Bender, III, Upper Darby, Pa.; James M. Brogan, 
Raleigh, N. C; Theron H. Brown, III, Jackson Heights, 
N. Y.; John W. Gamsby, New Haven, Conn.; Jeptha 
N. Gibson, Jr., Gibson, N. C; Robert A. Hamilton, Jr., 
Ridgefield Park, N. J.; Laurence E. Hoggan, Jr., New 
Haven, Conn.; Elliott H. Howe, Fulton, N. Y.; William 
M. Irwin, Jr., Sunbury, Pa.; Walter J. Kerr, Rumson, 
N. J.; Eugene L. Laning, Jr., Bridgeton, N. J.; Joseph R. 
Powell, Durham, N. C. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 42; Number of alumni chapters, 19; Total membership, 9,500; Delta Sigma Phi 
founded, December 10, 1899; Alpha Epsilon at Duke, January 24, 1920; Colors, nile green and white. Flower, 
white carnation; Publication, The Carnation. 

HISTORY 

The College of the City of New York was the founding-place of the Delta Sigma Phi fraternity, an order 
of thirty-five years' existence. The fraternity has had a substantial development, although its policy of 
expansion has been conservative. 

Since 1906 Delta Sigma Phi has been extended for the most part through the admittance of local groups 
by charter. Some of these had been well established organizations even before giving up their local identity. 
It is noteworthy that the Alfred University group had been started in 1901 as the Ku Klux Klan. 

Though place names were given the chapters as they were admitted up to 1906, the Greek letter nomen- 
clature was adopted then with one exception. This is the Hilgard chapter at the University of California, 
so designated because of the profound respect in which its chief patron's name is held. 

Alpha Epsilon of Duke is the ninth oldest national on the campus. 



302 





AT* 




MacQuarrie Mervine Page T. Gillies Hiatt 

Naktenis Smithdeal Kramer Ackley Stritzinger 

Powell Rockett Turner Shortell Herb 

Hamilton Gorringe Litterst W. Gillies Courtney 

Moritz West Boyle Ramsey 

Smith Kaye 



303 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 



Class of 1936 

George Beneke, Wheeling, W. Va.; John T. Cole, 
Warren, Ohio; Edward W. Cooey, Wheeling, W. Va.; 
Richard P. Griffin, Swarthmore, Pa.; Rolf Johnson, 
Harrisburg, Pa.; Fred N. Kellmeyer, Wheeling, 
W. Va.; Oliver D. Mann, Whitakers, N. C; Richard C. 
Piper, Ridgewood, N. J.; Joseph G. Powell, Moores- 
town, N. J.; Ralph A. Taylor, Summit, N. J.; Charles E. 
White, Hertford, N. C; Herbert G. Whiting, Mountain 
Lakes, N. J. 

Class of 1937 

Paul M. Beich, Bloominglon, 111.; Helmuth Bode, 
Weehawken, N. J.; Richard Eager, Camp Hill, Pa.; 
L. Palmer Fox, Harrisburg, Pa.; Richard G. Haas, 
Youngstown, Ohio; Alan W. Ham, East Milton, Mass.; 
Robert E. Kay, Wildwood, N. J.; Roderick Leland, New 
Canaan, Conn.; John P. Ondek, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Joseph M. Carl, 
White Plains, N. 



Class of 1938 

Harrisburg, Pa.; Nelson Cobleigh, 
Y.; Donald Dodd, Allentown, Pa., 



Joseph Fager, Camp Hill, Pa.; George T. Frampton, 
Scarsdale, N. Y.; Robert Greenawalt, Harrisburg, Pa.; 
William Hench, Harrisburg, Pa.; Rahn L. Hottenstein, 
Millersburg, Pa.; Walter Jerome, Winston-Salem, 
N. C; Curtis A. Jones, Townsend, Va.; L. Hunter 
Kevil, Princeton, Ky.; Robert Leavenworth, New 
Haven, Conn.; E. Gilbert Mathews, Hartsdale, N. Y.; 
Frank A. Mathey, New York, N. Y.; Charles Murphy, 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; Irwin Nailor, Camp Hill, Pa.; Stuart 
Orton, Rahway, N. J.; Harry Pfann, Mt. Lakes, N. J.; 
William Somerville, Cumberland, Md.; George 
Thornhill, Bluefield, W. Va.; Hubert P. Young, 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 



Pledges 

Arthur Collins Brown, Bethel, Conn.; William L. 
Bryan, Durham, N. C; Richard N. Clark, Montclair, 
N. J.; Gish N. Hoffman, Elizabethtown, Pa.; John E. 
Ingram, Lewes, Del.; Paul A. Lovell, Quincy, Mass.; 
John N. Manbeck, Lewistown, Pa.; Archibald G. 
Marshall, New Haven, Conn.; Charles A. Moorhead, 
Sunbury, Pa.; Allen Edward Nugent, New Haven, 
Conn.; Gordon A. Seeberg, Ansonia, Conn.; Clar- 
ence M. Stickell, Hagerstown, Md. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 84; Number of alumni chapters, 41; Total membership, 16,649; Lambda Chi 
Alpha founded, November 2, 1909; Gamma Theta Zeta at Duke, March 3, 1924; Colors, purple, green, and 
gold; Flower, violet; Publications, Cross and Crescent, and Delta Pi. 

HISTORY 

Somewhat unusual was the origin of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. It was founded at Boston University, 
growing out of the Cosmopolitan Law Club, which had been active there for several years. It was made a 
Greek-letter society with a view to national expansion. 

The fraternity did not establish further chapters, however, for more than two years; but, when expansion 
did take place, a great many of the chapters were formed from existing clubs. The former clubs were 
augmented by the granting of Lambda Chi Alpha charters to petitioning groups. 

Lambda Chi has had a remarkable growth, no chapter, up to 1930 at least, having become permanently 
inactive. There are chapters now in thirty-eight states of the Union; and, with the establishment of a Toronto 
in 1927, the fraternity became international. Lambda Chi is a charter member of the Inter-Fraternity 
Mce. 

Gamma Theta Zeta is tenth in age among Duke fraternities. Before 1924 it was the local fraternity 
Beta Pi. 



304 





Whiting Cole Piper 

Kellmeyer Cooey Powell 

Bode Griffin Beneke 

Fox Haas Kay 

Leland Ondek Jones 



Johnson White Mann 

Runner Taylor Ham 

Beich Greenawalt Thornhill 

Carl Young Somerville 

Dodd Orton Mathews 



Hench Leavenworth Mathey Frampton 
Hottenstein J. Fager 



305 



DELTA TAU DELTA 



Class of 1936 

Fredrick Andrus, Elizabeth, N. J.; William K. 
Brumbach, Belleville, N. J.; George B. Everitt, 
Winnetka, 111.; Newton Faulkner, Elmhurst, N. Y.; 
Robert W. Goodwin, Norway, Maine; Harold H. 
Kuhn, Charleston, W. Va.; John H. Plump, Pearl 
River, N. Y.; A. Lyman Wright, Elmira, N. Y. 



Class of 1937 

George B. Appleford, North Andover, Mass.; 
Richard E. Austin, Delmar, N. Y.; Chadwick Ballard, 
Exmore, Va.; William G. Birmingham, Jr., Liberty, 
N. Y.; Woodrow Burgess, Royal Oak, Mich.; Clayton J. 
Burrell, Wetmore, Mich.; A. Read Cone, Buffalo, N. Y.; 
Richard F. Hintermeister, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Frederick 
Johntz, Winston-Salem, N. C; Joseph R. Mackie, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; John Maher, Washington, D. C; 
Joseph W. Meyer, East Orange, N. J.; Jesse Muse, 
Savannah, Ga.; Charles R. Newberger, Maplewood, 
N. J.; Holmes E. Newton, Summit, N. J.; Paul H. Pettit, 
Ocean City, N. J.; Charles R. Plumb, Providence, 
R. I.; William M. Prindle, West Earrington, R. I.; Rob- 
ert L. Steenrod, Liberty, N. Y.; Robert A. Wilkinson, 
Millburn, N. J. 



Class of 1938 

Thomas G. Coen, Bayshore, N. Y.; Wilbur H. 
Crannell, Jr., Albany, N. Y.; Gordon W. Curtis, Jr., 
Atlanta, Ga.; T. Albert Farnsworth, Camden, N. Y.; 
Thomas D. Fernalld, Norwich, N. Y.; Clifford R. 
Faulkner, Elmhurst, N. Y.; Russell A. Gair, Jr., 
Norwich, N. Y.; Richard S. Hoffman, Cincinnati, 
Ohio; Harold A. Sykes, Queens Village, N. Y.; 
Walter E. Treut, Rutherford, N. J.; George Worth- 
ington, Washington, D. C. 



Pledges 

John Barkle, Drexel Hill, Pa.; Willis Butler, Shreve- 
port. La.; Clayton Carter, Centerville, Md.; Robert 
Critcher, Buffalo, N. Y.; Dewey Daane, Grand Rapids, 
Mich.; William Doyle, Lowell, Mich.; Eric Franson, 
Hackensack, N. J.; Albert Hancock, Port Washington, 
N. Y.; Herbert Lowenstein, Irvington, N. J.; Robert 
Merchant, Wilkensburg, Pa.; Hervey Moore, Sea Grit, 
N. J.; James Murray, Port Washington, N. Y.; Paul 
Sommers, Maplewood, N. J.; William Williams, 
Southold, N. Y. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 74; Number of alumni chapters, 59; Total membership, 24,000; Delta Tau 
Delta founded, 1858-1859; Delta Kappa at Duke, December 7, 1928; Colors, purple, white and gold; Flower, 
pansy; Publication, The Rainbow. 

HISTORY 

The Rainbow or W. W. W. society was founded in 1848 at the University of Mississippi. It was about 
ten years later that the parent chapter of Delta Tau Delta was organized at Bethany College, within the present 
limits of West Virginia. After lengthy negotiations the Rainbow fraternity in 1886 united with Delta Tau 
Delta. By this union the Rainbow chapters were entitled to membership in the Greek-letter order, though 
there is a distinction between these and the duly invested Delta chapters. 

This merging of national groups is unigue in fraternity annals. The Rainbow, because of greater age 
and different characteristics, was a valuable initiate into the conventional fraternity, and in truth members 
of the latter may well trace their fraternal lineage from both sources. 

Delta Tau Delta exists in all parts of the country and has expanded into Canada. 

The Duke chapter. Delta Kappa, is eight years old. In all of the Delt chapters a periodical is published 
at leasl nnre a year. 



306 





Plump Brambach Wright Everitt 

N. Faulkner Wilkinson Cone Kuhn 

Prundle Hintermeister Pettit Maher 

Mackie Ballard Newburger Curtiss 



Andrus Goodwin 

Birmingham Plumb 
Newton Burgess 

Fernalld Meyer 



Farnsworth Steenrod Austin Worthington C. Faulkner Muse 

Johntz Hoffman Treut Appleford 

Coen Sykes Crannell 



307 



SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 



Class of 1936 

Jack Alexander, Asheville, N. C; James K. Boling, 
Siler City, N. C; James A. Dearborn, Brookline, Mass.; 
Joseph Roland Goode, Jr., Alexandria, Va.; John M. 
Hennemier, Savannah, Ga.; William N. Klove, 
Oak Park, 111.; Raymond W. Laird, Gulfport, Miss.; 
Alan C. Puryear, Washington, D. C; Thurman Ward, 
Galax, Va. 



Class of 1938 

Charles W. DeVoe, Warren, Ohio; Danny Farrar, 
Youngstown, Ohio; Frank J. Fitzpatrick, Jr., Irvington, 
N. J.; James Graves, Richmond, Va.; Robert E. Hard- 
wicke. Fort Worth, Texas; A. Robert Long, Birming- 
ham, Ala.; Carl H. Mueller, Lakewood, Ohio; John J. 
Plumb, Hackensack, N. J.; Charles F. Turner, Birm- 
ingham, Ala.; Donald H. White, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Class of 1937 

R. Lynwood Baldwin, Durham, N. C; Fred N 
Cleaveland, Short Hills, N. J.; John L. Fisher, Lake 
wood, Ohio; Kenneth P. Folsom, Washington, D. C. 
Robert L. Nicks, Cedar Grove, N. C; John R. Pankey 
Bluefield, W. Va.; George E. Patterson, Macon, Ga. 
R. Winston Roberts, Birmingham, Ala.; Joseph Selser 
Jenkintown, Pa.; Kirby Smith, Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Ross C. Speir, Birmingham, Ala.; Pleasant Williams 
Ashland, Ky. 



Pledges 

John Robert Beaman, Morehead City, N. C; 
Bedford F. Boylston, Aiken, S. C; John Thomas 
Caskey, Washington, D. C; Lindsay Gonder, Oak- 
land, Md.; Richard M. Hiergesell, Roselle Park, N. I.; 
Robert McArthur, Winston-Salem, N. C; Eugene L. 
Morton, Lakewood, Ohio; John Howard Payne, Jr., 
Washington, D. C; Robert Stephens Puckett, Birming- 
ham, Ala.; Gilbert Ray Sparks, Jr., Palm Beach, Fla.; 
James Coleman Sterns, Jacksonville, Fla. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 108; Number of alumni chapters, 110; Total membership, 40,298; S. A. E. 
founded March 9, 1856; N. C. Nu at Duke, February 20, 1931; Colors, royal purple and old gold; Flower, 
violet; Publication, The Record. 

HISTORY 

Eight students at the University of Alabama were the founders of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. From 
this first chapter, which was given the name of Mu, the fraternity has had a rapid and constant growth. 
S. A. E. now exists in forty-six states. 

The wartime history of Sigma Alpha Epsilon is of absorbing interest. When the Civil War came, whole 
chapters, and parts of others went into service, there being members in both armies. A Kentucky girl who 
kept intact the documents of one of the chapters during the war period was rewarded with membership and 
the distinction of being the fraternity's only woman member. 

The World War battlefield was the scene of two S. A. E. initiation ceremonies, one in a German castle 
and another in a French chateau; and alumni associations were also formed on the Continent. 

North Carolina Nu chapter, when it came into existence five years ago, was formed from the local club, 
Psi Delta Sigma. 



308 





Goode 


Boling 


Dearborn 


Panlcey 


Alexander 


Laird 


Klove 


Hennemier 


Puryear 


Ward 


Baldwin 


Cleaveland 


Williams 


Boyleston 


Fisher 


Nicks 


Patterson 


Speir 


Smith 


Roberts 


DeVoe 


Gonder 


Folsom 


Graves 


Hardwicke 


Turner 


White 


Long 


Plumb 


MacArthur 



Mueller 



Farrar 



309 



SIGMA NU 



Class of 1936 

William D. Byrne, New Rochelle, N. Y.; Alfred H. 
Fuller, Hartford, Conn.; James M. Hatch, Charlotte, 
N. C.; Porter B. Huling, Williamsport, Pa.; Robert S. 
Long, Frankford, Del.; Robert P. Miller, Lincolnton, 
N. C.; John E. Moss, Mobile, Ala.; George R. Parrish, 
San Antonio, Texas; Horace E. Tabb, Elizabeth- 
town, Ky. 



Class of 1937 

Baron H. Cornett, Bluefield, W. Va.; Richard B. 
Gilpin, Maplewood, N. J.; Robert G. Howard, Wash- 
ington, D. C; Paul F. Ketchum, Washington, D. C; 
George G. Salmon, Jr., Maplewood, N. J.; Berkley V. 
Schaub, Westfield, N. J.; William P. Simmons, Bain- 



bridge, Ga.; James M. Slay, Greenville, N. C. 
Richard L. Walker, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Class of 1938 

L. Jack Hargett, Forrest City, Ark.; D. Davidson Hill, 
Sasser, Ga.; Forest A. Irwin, Trenton, N. J. 

Pledges 

Carl R. Drake, New Rochelle, N. Y.; Charles R 
Finefrock, Massillon, Ohio; John A. Goehrig, Trenton 
N. J.; Duncan K. MacLeod, Buffalo, N. Y.; Thomas T 
Munson, Detroit, Mich.; William Powers, Pleasant 
ville, N. Y.; Ronald J. Slay, Jr., Greenville, N. C. 
Harvey F. Sloan, Bellevue, Pa.; Emerson W. Terry 
Montclair, N. J.; Stanley J. Turner, Upper Mont 
clair, N. J. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 98; Number of alumni chapters, 75; Total membership, 32,100; Sigma Nu 
founded, January 1, 1869; Gamma at Duke, November 21, 1931; Colors, gold, black and white; Flower, white 
rose; Publication, The Delta. 

HISTORY 

Sigma Nu fraternity grew out of a secret society established at Virginia Military Institution in 1868 
called the Legion of Honor. The Greek letter designation and other college fraternity characteristics were 
adopted on January 1 of the very next year, the official date of founding of Sigma Nu by three western men. 

The Delta was so named because of the triangular relationship between the Alpha, Kappa, and Lambda 
chapters who collaborated in publishing it first in 1883. The official fraternity song is the recently written 
"White Star of Sigma Nu." 

Sigma Nu has active chapters in all the forty-eight states. Early in its history, growth was stimulated in 
the West, and the East was later exploited. 

The original Gamma chapter having ceased to exist, the Duke group, formerly the local "Goblins," 
was formally installed as Gamma chapter of Sigma Nu. Bearing the name of the third oldest chapter of 
their fraternity, the Sigma Nus are one of the newest nationals on Duke campus. 



310 




Huling 


Long 


Moss 


Miller 


Byrne 


Parrish 


Hatch 


Tabb 


Schaub 


Howard 


Salmon 


Simmons 


Gilpin 


Ketchum 


Walker 


Cornett 




Hill 


Slay 


Hargett 



311 



PHI KAPPA PSI 



Class of 1936 

Andrew L. Blair, Weston, W. Va.; Russell J. Forrest, 
Bloomfield, N. J.; Lawrence L. Gent, Cold Springs, 
N. Y.; Howard Getz, Nazareth, Pa.; David W. God- 
dard, Portsmouth, Ohio; James E. Henry, Nazareth, 
Pa.; John S. Ross, Queens Village, N. Y.; C. Van Wyck 
Smith, Rockville Centre, N. Y.; Louis Steeg, Toledo, 
Ohio. 



Class of 1937 

G. Robert Bailey, Rockville Centre, N. Y.; Charles 
H. Baker, Newark, N. J.; John P. Baldwin, Rochester, 
Pa:; Richard L. Beazley, South Orange, N. J.; Howard 
Eastwood, Jr., Burlington, N. J.; Willis G. Farmer, 
Bailey, N. C; Richard D. Jenkinson, Jr., Bellevue, 
Pa.; I^rederick R. Lauther, Lebanon, Pa.; Everett G. 
Perine, East Orange, N. J.; George P. Snyder, Jr., 
Ridgefield Park, N. J.; Howard Steiger, Williamsport, 
Pa.; Merrill Y. Stephens, Portland, Maine. 



Class of 1938 

Albert Anderson, Pelham Manor, N. Y.; Paul W. 
Bransford, Anderson, Ind.; Roger E. Bremer, Elmira, 
N. Y.; John D. Coe, Hartford, Conn.; George Hath- 
away, Bellaire, Ohio; C. Robert Hoffman, Fasten, Pa.; 
Harvey T. Jenkinson, Bellevue, Pa.; Chester Lucas, 
Hopkintown, Mass.; Donald A. Pengelly, Zanesville, 
Ohio; M. Douglas Sackman, Garden City, N. Y.; 
Donald Sheehan, Montclair, N. Y.; Norman Wherrett, 
Wilmington, Del.; Thomas Windsor, Cambridge, 
Mass. 



Pledges 

David F. Hew, Margate City, N. Y.; Edgar L. Danner, 
Larchmont, N. Y.; A. Gordon Fischer, Baltimore, 
Md.; Theodore Foote, Orange, N. J.; John Kahle, 
Columbus, Ohio; Robert N. Lose, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Herman Wenzel, Jr., Rockville Centre, N. Y.; Arthur 
O. Wooddy, Baltimore, Md. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 52; Number of alumni chapters, 40; Total membership, 25,250; Phi Kappa 
Psi founded, 1852; N. C. Alpha at Duke, November 10, 1934; Colors, Hunter's green and cardinal red; 
Publication, Shield. 

HISTORY 

Phi Kappa Psi was founded at Jefferson College, Washington, Pa., now Washington and Jefferson College, 
February 19, 1852. At the time it originated, there was an epidemic of typhoid fever at the college, and the 
warm friendships arising under the conditions of such trying times and from the close contacts between the 
afflicted and the friends ministering to them ripened into fraternal sentiment leading to the foundation of 
Phi Kappa Psi. 

The Civil War was a trying crisis in the affairs of the fraternity, with all southern chapters becoming 
extinct, and a large proportion of the fraternity's membership enlisted in the Union or Confederate armies. 
In the fo!!ov/inq forty years, however, expansion was rapid. 

S ta, a local fraternity, was founded at Duke University in the spring of 1928, the object of the 

found' J the petitioning of a well-known national fraternity. Its efforts were early directed toward 

Phi Kappa Psi; in the summer of 1934 its petition was formally accepted, and in the fall of 1934 Sigma Delta 
became North Carolina Alpha of Phi Kappa Psi. 



312 




Getz Henry 

Forrest Ross 

Beazley Baker 

H. Jenkinson J. Baldwin 

Anderson Bransford 



Sackman 



Bremer 



Goddard Gent Steeg 

Blair Smith Steiger 

Bailey Stevens R. Jenkinson 

Snyder Wherrett Eastwood 

Sheehan Windsor Lucas 

Hathaway Hoffman 



313 



PHI KAPPA SIGMA 



Class of 1936 

John J. Bruns, Jr., Baltimore, Md.; Fred C. Cady, 
Syracuse, N. Y.; Charles C. Eberly, Chester, Pa.; 
Irwin R. Hale, Greenfield, Mass.; Thomas J. Murray, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Edgar J. Oliver, Jr., Savannah, 
Ga.; A. Gray Wilson, Indiana, Pa. 



Tryon, N. C; Norman W. Van Nostrand, Jr., New York, 
N. Y.; Walter C. Wright, Jr., Wenonah, N. J. 

Class of 1938 

William L. Carson, Cleveland, Ohio; Harry V. 
Clark, Jr., Richmond Hill, N. Y.; Elmer T. Gale, 
Clinton, N. C; William B. Landis, Jr., Scranton, Pa. 



Class of 1937 

Albert E. Bennett, Brooklyn, N. Y.; J. Wesley Books, 
Haddon Heights, N. J.; Robert G. Hunter, Lansdowne, 
Pa.; George Maier, Jr., Bridgeton, N. J.; Edmund S. L. 
Miller, Hamburg, Pa.; Frederick P. Moore, Jr., East 
Gardner, Mass.; Carleton C. Phinney, Newtonville, 
Mass.; W. Emory Plaster, Jr., Leesburg, Va.; Walton 
O. Rich, Port Henry, N. Y.; Harold H. Shelnutt, 



Pledges 

James C. Boyd, Huntington, W. Va.; Woodrow W. 
Hayes, Durham, N. C; Fred R. Jackson, Jr., Charlotte, 
N. C; John B. Jones, Tyrone, Pa.; Lawrence H. Nath, 
Middleton, N. Y.; Roger J. Sherron, Jr., Durham, N. C; 
Robert H. Van Voorhis, Rutherford, N. J.; Clark 
Walter, Washington, D. C; George Walter, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



FACTS 

Number of initiates, 190; Number of alumni, 154; Colors, black and gold; Flower, white carnation; 
Founded, September, 1933; Number of initiates into Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity, 39. 

HISTORY 

In the spring of 1926, Pi Epsilon Pi was established here. From the time of its organization the fraternity 
took its place among the other social fraternities on the campus as an active and promising organization. 

The fall of 1928 saw the founding of another local, Sigma Alpha Omega, at Duke. This organization 
was founded with the purpose of petitioning a national fraternity. After two years of negotiations, Sigma 
Alpha Omega was permitted to change its name to Phi Kappa Sigma Club of Duke University. 

It was on Monday, May 13, 1935, that these two strong locals combined resources to form a unit. The 
new organization bears the name Phi Kappa Sigma Club. 

The Club is petitioning Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity, and is becoming more closely connected to the 
national organization by colonization. By means of this plan, most of the members of the local have been 
initialed into Phi Kappa Sigma by the Lambda chapter at the University of North Carolina. 

The fraternities on this campus await with pleasure the addition of a new national to their number. 



314 




Murray 


Bart 


Eberly 


Hale 


Cady 


Edmonds 


Wilson 


Oliver 


C. Walter 


Shelnutt 


Van Nostrand 


Miller 


Hippolitus 


Wright 


Maier 


Clark 


Jackson 


Moore 


Bennett 


Rich 


Landis 


Gale 


Hunter 


Plaster 


Books 




Stone 


Carson 


G. Walter 






315 



KEYS CLUB 



Class of 1936 

Calhoun Ancrum, Quantico, Va.; Robert Peck, 
Binghamton, N. Y.; Fred A. Wildnauer, East Orange, 
N. ].; Ernest Winton, Miami Beach, Fla. 



Class of 1937 

Charles Hooten, Salisbury, N. C; Edwin Rogers, 
Marlton, N. J.; Ashby Shepherd, Bristol, Md. 



FACTS 
Number of initiates, 50; Colors, gold and black; Keys Club founded, February 15, 1932. 

HISTORY 

The Keys Club, youngest social body on the Duke campus, was organized in 1932 by a group of first-year 
men with the assistance of the late Dean Moxley Arnold. Although not a fraternity in the strictly accepted 
sense, the Keys are taking steps toward national brotherhood by petitioning Beta Theta Pi. 





Winton 
Rogers 



Wildnauer 
Hooten 



Peck 
Shepherd 



316 




SORORITIES 



ALPHA DELTA PI 



Class of 1936 

Martha Bailey, Thomasville, Ga.; Kathlyn Buice, 
Charlotte, N. C.; Jane Goode, Lincolnton, N. C; 
Mary Elliot Henderson, Hickory, N. C; Annie Laurie 
Newsom, Durham, N. C. 



Class of 1937 

Walton Bowen, Macon, Ga.; Emilie Crum, Orange- 
burg, S. C; Margery Edwards, Greensboro, N. C.; 
Annadale Graeter, Richmond, Va.; Virginia Grow, 
Lebanon, N. H.; Anne Gwin, Natchez, Miss.; Lucile 
Hessick, Washington, D. C; Irma Johnson, Washing- 
ton, D. C; Marian Kiker, Reedsville, N. C; Jean 
Miller, Washington, D. C.; Mary Moore, Delray 
Beach, Fla.; Betty Pollard, Durham, N. C; Marian 
Reade, Durham, N. C; Virginia Skinner, Dur- 
ham, N. C. 

Class of 1938 

Lucy Chapman, Richmond, Va.; Helen Cockrell, 
Detroit, Mich.; Dorothy Emerson, Atlanta, Ga.; Dora 
Hill, Cuthbert, Ga.; Jane Love, Washington, D. C; 



Margaret Ann March, Mobile, Ala.; Jeanne McCauley, 
Hagerstown, Md.; Betty Jane Sauer, Lakewood, Ohio; 
Betty W. Stone, Clarendon, Va.; Louise Wannamaker, 
Durham, N. C; Marjorie Winston, Roanoke, Va.; 
Jean Young, Lakewood, Ohio. 

Pledges 

Priscilla Adams, Jacksonville, Fla.; Nancy Arthur, 
Zanesville, Ohio; Mary Agnes Bennett, Babson Park, 
Fla.; Martha Campbell, Bradenton, Fla.; Elizabeth 
Durant, Mobile, Ala.; Nancy Jo Ford, Asheville, N. C; 
Martha Virginia Gates, Macon, Ga.; Betty Claire 
Gray, Gastonia, N. C; Mary Trapp Harris, Cuthbert, 
Ga.; Dot Hastings, Durham, N. C; Jean Howell, 
Atlanta, Ga.; Martha Ledbetter, Rockingham, N. C; 
Emily Matheson, Atlanta, Ga.; Madeline McGinnis, 
Montclair, N. J.; Marguerite Neel, Thomasville, Ga.; 
Mary Toms Newsom, Durham, N. C; Margaret Owens, 
Cuthbert, Ga.; Margaret Peters, Jacksonville, Fla.; 
Betty Shuford, Conover, N. C; Lucy Gray Smithers, 
Winston-Salem, N. C; Anne Louise Steele, Rocking- 
ham, N. C; Mary Teer, Durham, N. C; Betty Lou 
Thompson, Gastonia, N. C; Evelyn White, Braden- 
ton, Fla.; Olivia Womble, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 57; Number of alumni chapters, 80; Total membership, 12,000; Alpha Delta Pi 
founded, May 15, 1851; Omicron at Duke, 1911; Colors, pale blue and white; Flower, purple violet; Publication, 
Adelphean. 

HISTORY 

Alpha Delta Pi, one of the largest and oldest national sororities, was originally the Adelphean Society, 
founded May 15, 1851, at Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga. The Adelphean Society, being the first secret 
society for women, founded at the first college for women, holds an important place in the early development 
of national sororities. The members of Alpha chapter applied for a charter and the society became nationally 
known as Alpha Delta Pi. This name was later changed to avoid any misunderstanding regarding a 
fraternity existing under the same name. As Alpha Delta Pi it has grown and expanded throughout the 
United States, and it became international with the installation of several chapters in Canada. 

The Adelphean, the national publication, is issued guarterly. 

Omicron chapter of Alpha Delta Pi has the distinction of being the first sorority on the Duke campus. 
It was installed in 1911 when Duke was known as Trinity College and has developed and expanded with the 
school. Since its installation approximately two hundred girls have been initiated into Alpha Delta Pi 
by Omicron. 



318 




Bowen 


Bailey 


Goode 


Henderson 


A. Newsom 


Buice 


Moore 


Owens 


Graeter 


Pierce 


Miller 


Emerson 


Crum 


Young 


Reade 


Hessick 


Grey 


Winston 


Wannamaker 


M. Newsom 


Neel 


Brahany 


Pollard 


Chapman 


Stone 


Kiker 


Harris 


Edwards 


Love 


Skinner 




March 


Cockrell 


Blanchard 


McCauley 






Ledbetter 


Hill 


Clements 


Sauer 





319 



KAPPA DELTA 



Class of 1936 

Eleanor Bruton, Condon, N. Y.; Sara Louise Falls, 
Shelby, N. C; Margaret Franck, Durham, N. C; 
Page Gooch, Henderson, N. C; Evelyn Goode, 
Statesville, N. C; Sara Jordan, York, Pa.; Mem 
Plyler, Durham, N. C; Margaret Waldrep, Ham- 
mond, La. 

Class of 1937 

Gary Armstrong, Selma, Ala.; Josephine Burger, 
Baltimore, Md.; Gwendolyn Cline, Charlotte, N. C; 
Eleanor Coppiedge, Cleveland Heights, Ohio; Martha 
Jane Culbertson, Norwood, Ohio; Jane Lee Jones, 
Belleville, 111.; Beth Lentz, Albemarle, N. C; Eleanor 
Mayes, Durham, N. C; Helen Phillips, Lexington, 
N. C; Alma L. Ranson, Charlotte, N. C; Jeanette 
TeSelle, Gainesville, Fla.; Mary Vickers, Oxford, 
N. C; Harriett Waits, Andalusia, Ala.; Margaret 
Washburn, Hempstead, N. Y. 



Class of 1938 

Mary Armstrong, Binghamton, N. Y.; Marian Buell, 
Rochester, N. Y.; Annie Whitty Daniel, Durham, 



N. C; Virginia Griffin, Baltimore, Md.; Ethel Little- 
john, Leesburg, Va.; Eleanor Lundy, Troy, N. Y.; 
Louise Meiklejohn, Cheraw, S. C; Margaret Ormond, 
Durham, N. C.; Betty Souders, Fayetteville, N. C; 
Betty Stine, Wilmington, Del. 



Pledges 

Mary Drew Clay, Macon, Ga.; Irma Coppersmith, 
Elizabeth City, N. C.; Marguerite Dewey, Goldsboro, 
N. C; Betty Erion, Orchard Park, N. Y.; Jean Eraser, 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; Jane Gassaway, Nashville, Tenn.; 
Jeanne Gorton, Great Neck, N. Y.; Mattilee Hughey, 
Statesville, N. C; Betty Ann Johnston, Doylestown, 
Pa.; Phoebe Kent, Washington, D. C; Nancy Laprade, 
Durham, N. C; Virginia Laws, Moravian Falls, N. C; 
Dorothy Reed Miller, Wilmington, Del.; Ruth Miller, 
Newburgh, N. Y.; Louise Mizell, Opp, Ala.; Virginia 
Morrison, Rockingham, N. C; Marianna Nicholson, 
Statesville, N. C; Ann Porter, Greensboro, Md.; 
Maxine Perdue, Canton, Ohio; Virginia Reeves, 
Waynesville, N. C; Frances Ruark, Park Ridge, 111.; 
Margaret Rudisill, Cherry ville, N. C; Betty Short- 
lidge, Lincoln University, Pa.; Sara Waits, Andalusia, 
Ala.; Lee Wooldridge, West Hartford, Conn. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 68; Number of alumni chapters, 66; Total membership, 13,083; Kappa Delta 
founded, October 23, 1897; Sigma Delta at Duke, April 19, 1912; Colors, olive green and pearl white; Flower, 
white rose; Publication, Angelos. 

HISTORY 

Kappa Delta Sorority was founded by four girls at Virginia State Normal, Farmville, Virginia, on October 
23, 1897. Through personal friendships of the Virginia girls with those of other colleges, new chapters 
were rapidly added to the organization. The first convention was held in Richmond, Virginia, in 1904, at 
which six chapters were represented. Since that time the society has established chapters throughout 
the United States. The journal of Kappa Delta is the Angelos, which was first published in 1904. 

Virginia is the center of Kappa Delta philanthropic projects because it is the state of the sorority's 
founding. In Richmond, Virginia, the national organization maintains a ward, a dental room, and a gymna- 
sium in the Richmond Crippled Children's Hospital. Aside from this, individual chapters of Kappa Delta 
carry on r-ommunity charitable work. 

' ".'Ita of Kappa Delta was installed at Trinity College, now Duke University, on April 19, 1912, by 
two I ; of the national council, Misses Cora Vaughn and Jean Coltrone. Kappa Delta was the second 

sorority to be installed on the Trinity College campus, and since that time has grown steadily. 



320 






'•Ki2r_',*i'.J:'.».s. 



Bruton 


Franck 


Falls 


Plyler 


RudisiU 


Vickers 


W a Id rep 


Jordan 


TeSelle 


Gooch 


Washburn 


Jones 


Lentz 


Cline 


Burger 


Phillips 


Littlejohn 


Culbertson 


Mayes 


Armstrong 


Ormond 


Daniel 


Stine 


Souders 


Lundy 




Coppedge 


Goode 


Waits 






Buell 


Meiklejohn 


Griffin 





321 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 



Class of 1936 

Margaret Becker, Upper Darby, Pa.; Alice Jones, 
Petersburg, Va.; Emmy Lou Morton, Charleston, 
W. Va.; Frances Paist, Wayne, Pa.; Eleanor Stevenson, 
New Bern, N. C; Madge Woolsey, Glen Rock, N. J. 



Class of 1937 

Mary Auld, Charleston, W. Va.; Norma Forbes, 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; Charlotte Kueffner, Durham, N. C; 
Virginia Lytle, Jacksonville, Fla.; Elizabeth Riley, 
Durham, N. C; Helen Slater, Detroit, Mich.; Elizabeth 
Small, Wyoming, N. J.; Catherine Tritle, Erie, Pa.; 
Ella Waters, Washington, D. C; Katharine White, 
Elizabeth, N. J. 



Class of 1938 

Fan Auld, Charleston, W. Va.; Elizabeth Bogert, 
Ridgewood, N. J.; Jean Campbell, Great Neck, N. Y.; 
Dorothy Dick, Copperhill, Tenn.; Margaret Morton, 
Charleston, W. Va. 



Pledges 

Lois Aitkin, E. Orange, N. J.; Dorothy Barnes, 
Charleston, W. Va.; Doris Becker, Upper Darby, Pa.; 
Betty Brown, Blanchester, Ohio; Louise Brugh, Mont- 
gomery, W. Va.; Virginia Chason, Elizabeth, N. J.; 
Katherine Chubb, Maplewood, N. J.; Dorothy Creery, 
Drexel Hill, Pa.; Jean Dipman, Montclair, N. J.; 
Nona Ruth Draper, Richlands, Va.; Jane Dusenbury, 
Miami, Fla.; Betty Earle, Hermansville, Mich.; Eliza- 
beth Fuller, Arlington, Va.; Lillian Gibson, Elizabeth, 
N. J.; Mary Louise Goree, Chattanooga, Tenn.; 
Helen Leslie, New York, N. Y.; Lucy McBride, Nutley, 
N. J.; Elizabeth Marlatt, Larchmont, N. Y.; Anne 
Muelburger, Maplewood, N. J.; Jean Ord, McKees- 
port. Pa.; Eunice Parker, Goldsboro, N. C; Dorothy 
Powell, Detroit, Mich.; Helen Rocke, Norfolk, Va.; 
Jane Roe, Maundsville, W. Va.; Frances Sewell, 
Atlanta, Ga.; Edna Sexton, Zebulon, N. C; June 
Southworth, Washington, D. C; Doris Stein, Hagers- 
town, Md.; Aileen Titus, Washington, D. C; Gene- 
vieve Tolson, New Bern, N. C; Frances Utley, 
Lynchburg, Va.; Lois Whiting, Mountain Lakes, 
N. J.; Helen Wilson, Beaver, Pa.; Beth Woolfolk, 
Roanoke, Va. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 61; Number of alumni chapters, 58; Total membership, 9,918; Zeta Tau Alpha 
founded, October 15, 1898; Phi at Duke, June 4, 1915; Colors, turquoise blue and steel gray; Flower, white 
violet; Publication, Themis. 

HISTORY 

Zeta Tau Alpha was founded at Virginia State Normal School, Farmville, Virginia, on October 15, 1898. 
For several months after its founding it was known as the ??? (The Three Question Mark Girls). Before 
April, 1899, the Greek name was adopted, and on March 15, 1902, Zeta Tau Alpha was chartered as a legal 
corporation by the legislature of Virginia. Thus it was not only the first women's fraternity to be chartered 
in the state of Virginia, but the first chartered by a special act of the legislature. 

Northern sororities had become well established by the end of the nineteenth century, but the southern 
field was left practically open. Zeta Tau Alpha was one of the first sororities to fill this need of organization 
in the South, and for several years continued its expansion in the southern states. The first northern chapter 
was started at Boston University, February 22, 1912. Zeta Tau Alpha became international in 1929 with the 
installation of Beta Rho Chapter at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 
^. The magazine of Zeta Tau Alpha, Themis, is published quarterly, and was first issued in 1903. 



322 





Woolsey 


Heard 


E. Morton 


Becker 


Stevenson 


Pearson 


Small 


Pinnix 


Jones 


White 


M. Auld 


Sewell 


Paist 


Slater 


Waters 


Kueffner 


Toner 


F. Auld 


Dick 


Whitmore 


Riley 


MacBride 


Forbes 


Campbell 


Bogert 




Woolfolk 


Tolson 


M. Morton 





323 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA 



Class of 1936 

Eleanor Barrett, Stamford, Conn.; Dorothy Brown, 
Neemah, Wis.; Margaret Cuninggim, Nashville, 
Tenn.; Lenora Fanning, Asheville, N. C; Jane 
Haislip, Lumberport, W. Va.; Susan Hardy, Rome, 
Ga.; Anne Jones, Birmingham, Ala.; Constance 
Patton, Wilmington, N. C; Dorothy Peck, Huntington 
Valley, Pa.; Mary Alice Rhodes, Chattanooga, Tenn.; 
Audrey Speicher, Rockwood, Pa. 



Class of 1937 

Frances Childs, Durham, N. C; Frances Edwards, 
Miami, Fla.; Betty Faires, Drexel Hill, Pa.; Charlotte 
Marshall, Ashland, Pa.; Nancy Pate, Raleigh, N. C; 
Lucy Rauchenberg, Atlanta, Ga.; Anne Louise Reist, 
Lancaster, Pa.; Elizabeth Anne Sasscer, Chevy Chase, 
Md.; Shirley Teed, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Sarah Williams, 
Elizabeth City, N. C; Katherine Upchurch, Dur- 
ham, N. C. 

Class of 1938 

Joan Bliss, Nashville, Tenn.; Virginia Braznell, 
Miami, Fla.; Mary Elizabeth Carter, Nashville, Tenn.; 
Julia Coffman, Clarksburg, W. Va.; Margaret Epple- 
man, Haddonfield, N. J.; Mary Brent Holland, New 



Bern, N. C; Mary Louise Idema, Grand Rapids, 
Mich.; Nancy Johnson, Birmingham, Ala.; Elizabeth 
Jones, New Bern, N. C; Winifred Maxwell, Clarks- 
burg, W. Va.; Ariel Moneyhun, Knoxville, Tenn.; 
Sara Rankin, Gastonia, N. C; Loula Southgate, 
Durham, N. C; Margaret White, Ridgewood, N. J.; 
Rhoda Widgery, Durham, N. C. 



Pledges 

Mary Anderson, New Bern, N. C; Mary Dean 
Barrett, Stamford, Conn.; Mary Duke Biddle, New 
York, N. Y.; Jane Braznell, Miami, Fla.; Carolyn 
Breedlove, Durham, N. C; Frances Briggs, Durham, 
N. C; Faye Espenchied, Washington, D. C; Jane 
Fife, Jasper, Ala.; Georgia Goodson, Winston-Salem, 
N. C; Carolyn Groves, Red Hook, N. Y.; Frances 
Hahn, Toledo, Ohio; Dorothy Hedrick, Salisbury, 
N. C; Margaret How, Cleveland, Ohio; Lorraine 
Hyde, Asbury Park, N. J.; Jean Kouwenhoven, Scars- 
dale, N. Y.; Betsy McCleod, Buffalo, N. Y.; Jean 
Maxwell, Clarksburg, W. Va.; Jean MacDonald, 
Cleveland, Ohio; Jean Milliette, Drexel Hill, Pa.; 
Sally Robertson, White Plains, N. Y.; Anna Shuford, 
Gastonia, N. C; Carol Strauss, Winston-Salem, N. C; 
Winifred Woodbridge, Detroit, Mich.; Nancy Webb, 
Greenwich, Conn. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 63; Total membership, 25,000; Kappa Alpha Theta founded, January 27, 
1870; Beta Rho at Duke, 1928; Colors, black and gold; Flower, black and gold pansy; Publication, Kappa 
Alpha Theta. 

HISTORY 

Kappa Alpha Theta, the first Greek-letter fraternity known among women, was founded at DePauw 
University, then Asbury College, at Greencastle, Indiana, in 1870. Although at that time there were three 
other women's fraternities in existence, these did not adopt Greek letter names until somewhat later. Kappa 
Alpha Theta was founded in a co-educational institution where the same needs which led to the establishment 
of Greek letter societies among men were felt by the women; therefore, Theta was the first society for women 
organized with principles and methods akin to those of the Greek-letter fraternities. 

The magazine, the Kappa Alpha Theta, is published quarterly, the first issue being in 1885. 

In 1925, a local, Sigma Tau, was formed, which petitioned Kappa Alpha Theta. In 1928, the petition 
was accepted and Sigma Tau was installed as Beta Rho chapter of Kappa Alpha Theta. Since 1928 Beta 
Rho has initiated one hundred girls into Kappa Alpha Theta, and has always maintained a high standard, 
both .sr-holastically and socially on the Duke University campus. 



324 




Haislip 


Barrett 


Hardy 


Jones 


Rhodes 


Cuninggim 


Idema 


Reist 


Sasscer 


Faires 


Teed 


Hull 


Hahn 


Peck 


Johnston 


Edwards 


Rauschenberg 


Marshall 


Strauss 


Upchurch 


Kenney 


Childs 


Coffman 


Maxwell 


White 


Breznell 


Rankin 


Lambert 


Pate 


Anderson 


Williams 


Holland 


Fite 


Carter 


Jones 



325 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 



Class of 1936 

Lucille Butler, Shreveport, La.; Barbara Daniel 
Claxton. Ga.; Bessie Graham, Palm Beach, Fla. 
Dorothy Gray, Summit, N. J.; Christine Harris, Coral 
Gables, Fla.; June Langfitt, Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Marian McClenaghan, Raleigh, N. C; Betty Parks 
Long Island, N. Y.; Helen Parsons, Altoona, Pa. 
Marie Pelgrim, Coral Gables, Fla.; Ruth Phillips 
Wheeling, W. Va.; Kathryn Whitmyre, Indiana, Pa. 
Ellen Wilwer, Tulsa, Okla. 



Class of 1937 

Barbara Armstrong, Morgantown, W. Va.; Paula 
Bassett, New York, N. Y.; Isobel Craven, Lexington, 
N. C; Dorothy Davis, Richmond, Va.; Betty Ann 
Hunt, Philadelphia, Pa.; Bess Laing, Charleston, 
V/. Va.; Frances Merrill, Charleston, W. Va.; Althea 
Nolde, New Orleans, La.; Tekla Parker, German- 
town, Pa.; Nancy Peterson, Woodbury, N. J.; Jean 
Ann Pippen, Charleston, W. Va.; Anne Wagner, 
Long Island, N. Y.; Margery White, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Class of 1938 

Barbara Blair, Monmouth, 111.; Mary Jean DeCamp, 
Clarksburg, W. Va.; Cameron Forness, Drexel Hill, 
Pa.; Grace Grant, Hartford, Conn.; Katharine 
Hadley, Washington, D. C; Doris Larson, East Engle- 
wood, N. J.; Ruth Minor, Batavia, N. Y.; Rowena 
Sidbury, Wilmington, N. C; Louise Varnes, Wil- 
mington, Del.; Patricia Witte, Rahway, N. J. 

Pledges 

Gwen Adams, Martinsburg, W. Va.; Mary Lalla 
Byrn, Mayfield, Ky.; Margaret Coleman, Kenosha, 
Wis.; Carroll Costigan, Bloomington, 111.; Martha 
Crocker, Tulsa, Okla.; Betty Emery, Sanford, Maine; 
Johnnie Mae Hardy, Gulfport, Miss.; Anne Hollmeyer, 
Mountain Lakes, N. J.; Clarinda Jackson, St. Augus- 
tine, Fla.; Barbara Jenkins, Scranton, Pa.; Betty 
Klemm, Bloomington, 111.; Grace G. Koehler, Fort 
Hamilton, N. Y.; Mary Lawrence, Reading, Pa.; 
Carolyn Lindhjem, Mt. Vernon, N. Y.; Mary Magraw, 
Carlsbad, N. M.; Helen Nelson, Logansport, Ind.; 
Eleanor Oak, Bound Brook, N. J.; Elizabeth Pennell, 
Fort Bragg, N. C; Virginia Richey, Corinth, Miss.; 
Helen Roberson, Durham, N. C; Claire Thompson, 
Miami Beach, Fla.; Betty Whitaker, Indianapolis, Ind. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 71; Number of alumni chapters, 95; Total membership, 24,000; K. K. G. 
founded, October 13, 1870; Delta Beta at Duke, October 25, 1930; Colors, light and dark blue; Flower, 
fleur-de-lis; Publication, Key. 

HISTORY 

Kappa Kappa Gamma is one of the oldest of the Greek-letter sororities. It was founded at Monmouth 
College, Monmouth, Illinois, in 1870. Kappa was the first sorority to call a Pan-Hellenic Congress, to hold 
a national convention, to institute a central form of government, to publish a sorority magazine, to form a 
uniform budget system, and to send coorganizers to assist new chapters. A complete history of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma was presented to the national convention of 1930. 

The Key, a quarterly publication, contains news-letters from all active chapters, and discussions of 
sorority problems and events, both national and local. 

Kappa maintains two funds: one set aside to assist needy Kappas; the other, to give deserving students 
an opportunity to complete their education. 

In 1928, a local sorority, Sigma Beta, was organized on the Duke University campus with the express 
purpose of petitioning Kappa Kappa Gamma. The official petition was submitted in March, 1930, and on 
October 25, of the same year, Sigma Beta became Delta Beta chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



326 





Whitmyre 


Parsons 


Phillips 


Daniel 


Parks 


Gray 


Motlow 


Langfitt 


McClenaghan 


Harris 


Craven 


Pelgrim 


Butler 


Bassett 


Witwer 


Parker 


Peterson 


White 


Littel 


Byrn 


Wagner 


Minor 


Kern 


Hollmeyer 


Laing 


Richey 


Forness 


Pippen 


Hardy 


DeCamc 



327 



SIGMA KAPPA 



Class of 1936 

Josephine Eaby, Lancaster, Pa.; Dallas Knight, 
Ambler, Pa.; Katherine Trousdale, Florence, Ala.; 
Virginia Winfree, Lynchburg, Va. 



Class of 1937 

Jean Brown, Fort Benning, Ga.; Charlotte Mark- 
ham, Durham, N. C; Camilla Ritchie, Binghamton, 
N. Y.; Doris Wood, Mt. Morris, N. Y. 



Class of 1938 

Mary Bender, Lititz, Pa.; Helen Holly, Harrisburg, 
Pa.; Eleanor Huntington, Rutherford, N. J.; Martha 



Pace, 
more. 



Wilkes-Barre, 
Md. 



Pa.; Virginia Patrick, Balti- 



Pledges 

Lola Barnhill, Vl^'ilmington, Del.; Catherine DeHuff, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Grace Evans, Windber, Pa.; Delina 
Heiss, Neffsville, Pa.; Betty Koehnlein, Kenmore, Pa.; 
Sue Kohler, Charlotte, N. C; Patricia Patrick, Balti- 
more, Md.; Nell Puckett, Charlotte, N. C; Betty 
Rescorla, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; Janet Rettew, Harrisburg, 
Pa.; Ruth Simmons, Wilmington, Del.; Grace Stamets, 
Pittsburgh, Pa.; Mary Storb, New Holland, Pa.; 
Dorothy Taylor, Wilmington, Del.; Virginia Wei- 
scher, Peekskill, N. Y.; Dorothy Wilkins, Rockville 
Centre, N. Y. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 44; Total membership, 8,459; Sigma Kappa founded, 1874; Alpha Psi at 
Duke, January 4, 1931; Colors, maroon and lavender; Flower, violet; Publication, Triangle. 

HISTORY 

Sigma Kappa stands among the pioneer Greek -letter societies for women. It was founded in 1874 at 
Colby College, Waterville, Maine, by the first five women enrolled there, and became a member of National 
Pan-Hellenic Congress in 1904. Since that time Sigma Kappa has become international, having chapters 
located in Canada. 

The chief publication of the sorority is the Triangle, a quarterly magazine issued first in 1907, giving a 
full account of Sigma Kappa activities and interesting personalities. 

In 1918, Sigma Kappa adopted as its national philanthropy the educational work of the Maine Sea Coast 
Missionary Society. This work is centered among the fisherfolk on the many small islands off the New 
England coast. 

In 1922, a scholarship fund was established for the purpose of aiding members of Sigma Kappa to com- 
plete college courses. As an incentive to encourage high scholarship, a national committee makes an 
annual award of a scholarship cup to the chapter having the best record. 

The local sorority. Delta Psi, was organized in February, 1929, with the purpose of petitioning Sigma 
Kappa lor a charter. The petition was accepted in December, 1930, and on January 4, 1931, Delta Psi was 
installed as Alpha Psi chapter of Sigma Kappa. 



328 




Knight 


Eaby 


Winfree 


Huntington 


Trousdale 


Ritchie 


Brown 


Patrick 


Pace 


Holly 


Bender 
Wallace 


Harvin 



329 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 



Class of 1936 

Inez Abernethy, Durham, N. C; Dorothy L. Brown, 
Clarksville, Tenn.; Kay Goodman, Ashland, Ky.; 
Gene Martin Laney, Sanford, Fla.; Helen Lieb, 
Elizabeth, N. J.; Margaret Moore, Clarendon, Va.; 
Dorothy Neff, Washington, D. C; Clary Peoples, 
Asheville, N. C; Pat Sills, Nashville, N. C; Gladys 
Souder, Macon, Ga.; Isobel Shriner, York, Pa. 



Class of 1937 

Elizabeth Akin, Detroit, Mich.; Marie Anderson, 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Page Bynum, Rocky Mount, N. C; 
Mary W. Chapman, Durham, N. C; Donna Day, 
Bradenton, Fla.; Doris Day, Bradenton, Fla.; Barbara 
Rich, South Orange, N. J.; Edna Rogan, Baltimore, 
Md.; Charlotte Siehler, Baltimore, Md.; Margaret 
Zecher, Lebanon, Pa. 



Class of 1938 

Virginia Grainger, Cynwood, Pa.; Merle Kirkwood, 
Hattiesburg, Miss.; Nellie Anna Opper, New Rochelle, 
N. Y.; Sarah Ann Parker, Vineland, N. J.; Isabelle 
Sultner, York, Pa.; Ann Watson, Cheraw, S. C. 

Pledges 

Beatrice Abernethy, Durham, N. C; Minnie 
Brandon, Blackstone, Va.; Maidie Brown, South 
Orange, N. J.; Margaret Helvenston, Ocala, Fla.; 
Jane Horsting, Chicago, III.; Frances Henson, Rah- 
way, N. I.; Betty Hopkins, East Radford, Va.; Ann 
Oliver, Akron, Ohio; Sue Ould, Roanoke, Va.; 
Hortense Eraser, Elizabeth, N. J.; Doris Harrison, 
Crosswicks, N. J.; Josephine Prosser, St. Michael, Pa.; 
Marion Park, Leland, Miss.; Dorothy Sawyer, Ken- 
osha, Wis.; Ellen Smith, York, Pa.; Virginia Smith, 
Baldwin, N. Y.; Janet Rawdon, Oberlin, Ohio; 
Dorothea Zecher, Lebanon, Pa.; Muriel Wriston, 
Albany, N. Y.; Jean Thorns, Hawthorne, N. J.; Clyde 
Lee Whiddon, Ft. Pierce, N. C; Sara Sue Womack, 
Murfreesboro, Tenn.; Mary Tobin, Princeton, W. Va.; 
Jane Allen, Miami, Fla.; Ruth Kelleher, Audubon, 
Pa.; Erlene Ellis, York, Pa. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 87; Total membership, 20,780; Delta Delta Delta founded, November, 1888; 
Alpha Omicron at Duke, November, 1931; Colors, silver, gold and blue; Flower, pansy; Publication, Trident. 

HISTORY 

Delta Delta Delta was founded at Boston University on Thanskgiving Eve, 1888. Tri-Delta has never 
been a sectional organization. Founded in the East, its first charters were distributed over all sections of 
this country, and three chapters were established in Canada. Tri-Delta has alumnae chapters in all of the 
larger cities. 

Delta Delta Delta was one of the six sororities represented at the first Pan-Hellenic Congress which was 
held in 1891. In the first history of the sorority, published in 1907, there was a chapter devoted to the develop- 
ment of the Pan-Hp|lenic movement. The other publications of Delta Delta Delta include the quarterly 
magazine, !■ -.t, published since 1891. A song book and various secret publications are also issued. 

Delta I ii accepted the petition of a local, Delta Upsilon, formed on the Duke University campus, 

and Alpha Omicron was installed November 7, 1931. Since that time the sorority has grown in membership 
and prestig"- Tl>" excellent work of the chapter in the past bespeaks of a successful future. 



330 




Aberneth^ 


' Shriner 


Souder 


Moore 


Brown 


Nett 


Leib 


Goodman 


Sills 


Laney 


Siehler 


Tobin 


Fraser 


Anderson 


Rich 


Rogan 


Doris Day- 


Donna Day 


Helvenston 


Ould 


Zecher 


Akin 


Watson 


Bynum 


Kirkwood 




Parker 


Opper 


Sultner 






331 



PI BETA PHI 



Class of 1936 
Mary Frances Ivey, Durham, N. C. 

Class of 1937 

Anna Boyd, Jacksonville, Fla.; Helen Larzelere, 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Ruth Michler, Easton, Pa.; Carroll 
Patterson, Miami, Fla.; Ruth Rea, London, Ohio; 
Frances Smith, Easton, Pa.; Helen Smith, Tifton, Ga. 



Class of 1938 

Ruth Couse, Baltimore, Md.; Jane East, E. Orange, 
N. J.; Betty Gene Gilbert, Chatanooga, Tenn.; Wini- 
fred Greenwood, St. Albans, N. Y.; Ruth Herrmann, 
Baltimore, Md.; Beverly Kurtzmann, Maplewrood, N. J.; 



Ann Louise Laupp, Wheeling, W. Va.; Helen Lewis, 
New York, N. Y.; Charlotte Miller, Miami, Fla.; 
Betty Pohlman, Chicago, 111. 

Pledges 

Betty Ball, Maplewood, N. J.; Barbara Browne, 
Hickory, N. C; Margaret Carrigan, Jersey City, N. J.; 
Jean Dickerson, Schenectady, N. Y.; Hilliard Hardin, 
Clover, S. C; Dorothy Henry, Atlanta, Ga.; Virginia 
Jones, Wheeling, W. Va.; Jane Kelley, Atlanta, Ga.; 
Miriam MacMuUen, Maplewood, N. J.; Sarah Ann 
Overshiner, Hopkinsville, Ky.; Elizabeth Powell, 
Shreveport, La.; Martha Kate Schmidt, Louisville, 
Ky.; Anne Scott, Waco, Tex.; Polly Smith, Phillips- 
burg, N. J.; Dorothy Stone, Biddeford, Maine; Ruth 
Whitaker, Dravosburg, Pa.; Martha Jane Williams, 
Easton, Pa.; Rebecca Willis, Shreveport, La. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 79; Total membership, 25,792; Pi Beta Phi founded, April 28, 1867; Beta at 
Duke, February 17, 1933; Colors, wine red and silver blue; Flower, white carnation; Publication, Arrow. 

HISTORY 

Pi Beta Phi, the oldest national fraternity for women, was founded April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College, 
Monmouth, Illinois, under the name of I. C. Sorosis. In 1883, the Greek name was adopted as a sub-title. 
Five years later, the name I. C. Sorosis was discontinued, and in 1889 the fraternity was incorporated under 
the state laws of Illinois as Pi Beta Phi. 

The journal of Pi Beta Phi, the Arrow, which was first printed in 1885, is published quarterly. As an 
encouragement for high scholarship, the fraternity maintains a number of scholarships and fellowships for 
its members. 

North Carolina Beta of Pi Beta Phi had its origin in the local sorority, Mu Lambda, founded April 22, 

1929. The purpose of the founders of Mu Lambda was to obtain a charter of Pi Beta Phi, and to this end they 

r - ■ ■ '■-■d, refusing unsolicited offers of charters from other national fraternities. A formal petition was 

1 to Pi Beta Phi on January 14, 1933. On February 17, 1933, Miss Amy Burnham Onken, National 

OraiiU i-Tesident of Pi Beta Phi, formally installed Mu Lambda as North Carolina Beta. 



332 




Moore 


Brown 


Larzelere 


Patterson 


Ivey 


H. Smith 


Scott 


Overshiner 


Lewis 


Dickerson 


Schmidt 


Carter 


Boyd 


Michler 


Greenwood 


Kurtzmann 


Laupp 


Powell 


Herrmann 


East 




Miller 


Rea 


Jones 






F. Smith 


Willis 


Couse 






333 



PHIMU 



Class of 1936 

Gwendolyn Clark, Durham, N. C; Ellen Farnum, 
Asheville, N. C; Virginia Johnson, Lexington, N. C; 
Rachel Meetze, Charlotte, N. C; Marion Roe, Cler- 
mont, Fla.; Hilda Sally, Durham, N. C; Rachel Sink, 
Lexington, N. C; ElizaJDeth Sutton, Harrisburg, Pa. 



Class of 1937 

Claire Clarke, New York, N. Y.; Ruby Flanagan, 
Lynchburg, Va.; Marjorie Goddard, New York, N. Y.; 
Doris MacNutt, Ridgefield Park, N. J.; Jean McCowan, 
New York, N. Y.; Evelyn Mclntyre, New York, N. Y.; 
Ada Whitmore, Durham, N. C. 



Class of 1938 

Frances Butler, Camilla, Ga.; Jeanne Cole, Col- 
lingswood, N. J.; Virginia Fulton, Roanoke, Va.; 
Margaret Molloy, Ivyland, Pa.; Betty Stowell, Fox 
Chase Hills, Pa.; Pauline Davis, Roanoke, Va.; 
Dorothy Miller, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Pledges 

Ann Dives, Shillington, Pa.; Helen Goodale, Jack- 
sonville, Fla.; Betty Marshall, Hendersonville, N. C; 
Mary Helen MacClements, Charlotte, N. C; Jean 
Moreton, Erie, Pa.; Emilie Peebles, Chevy Chase, 
Md.; Ann Putnam, V\^ashington, D. C; Catherine 
Raine, Rainelle, W. Va.; Helen Baxter Smith, Virginia 
Beach, Va.; Sara Spruill, Goldsboro, N. C; Mary 
Tice, Bethlehem, Pa. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 59; Total membership, 10,238; Phi Mu founded, January 4, 1852; Gamma 
Epsilon at Duke, November 10, 1934; Colors, rose and white; Flower, pink carnation; Publication, The Aglaia. 

HISTORY 

Phi Mu, the second oldest secret organization for women, was founded January 4, 1852, at Wesleyan 
College, Macon, Georgia, under the name of the Philomathean Society. Later the members applied for a 
charter, thus establishing the foundation of the national organization of Phi Mu. 

The Aglaia, the national publication, is issued guarterly. The fraternity, through the Alpha Memorial 
Fund, affords loans to the members to complete their college courses. The National Philanthropic Endow- 
ment Fund assures a permanent national philanthropy. 

In April, 1933, a local sorority. Delta Epsilon, was founded at Duke with the purpose of petitioning a 
national fraternity. The local received many offers of charters from outstanding national fraternities. On 
July 2, 1934, a petition was presented to Phi Mu at their National Convention, and on November 9, of the 
same year, Mrs. C. R. Rader, former national president, installed Gamma Epsilon of Phi Mu. 



334 




Meetze Farnum 


Sink 


Sutton 


MacNutt Goddard 


Roe 


Clarke 


Flanagan Mclntyre 


Butler 


Davis 


Cole Clark 


Dives 


MoUoy 


McCowan Tice 




Fulton 


Stowell 


Miller 






335 



ALPHA PHI 



Class of 1936 

Ida Shaw Applewhite, Halifax, N. C; Ruth Bennett, 
Clarksburg, W. Va.; Betty Halsema, Baguio, Phil- 
ippine Islands; Catherine Rankin, Mount Gilead, 
N. C.; Margaret Taylor, Chester, Pa. 

Class of 1937 

Sara Duckett, Charlotte, N. C; Frederica Duehring, 
Washington, D. C; Virginia Duehring, Washington, 
D. C; Mary Lou Kincheloe, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Class of 1938 

Rebecca Atzrodt, Clarksburg, W. Va.; Betty Fraser, 
Fort Bragg, N. C; Frances Salmon, Manila, Phil- 



ippine Islands; Mary Elizabeth Smith, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Margery Wright, Clarksburg, W. Va. 



Pledges 

Elizabeth Applewhite, Halifax, N. C; Jean Beebe, 
Lewes, Del.; Helen Bennett, Clarksburg, W. Va.; 
Dorothy Butt, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Emily Coolidge, Green- 
field, Mass.; Louise Fraser, Fort Bragg, N. C; Mar- 
garet Garver, Ivyland, Pa.; Caroline Hagy, Imboden, 
Va.; Constance Howard, Forest Hills, N. Y.; Susan 
Phillips, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Dorothy Reed, Roxbury, 
Maine; Jean Snider, Meyersdale, Pa.; Countess Tabor, 
Boissevan, Va.; Miriam Weckeser, Durham, N. C; 
Jane Winters, Greenwich, Conn. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 36; Number of alumnae chapters, 64; Total membership, 8,500; Alpha Phi 
founded, October 10, 1872; Beta Nu at Duke, May 11, 1935; Flowers, lily-of-the-valley and forget-me-not; 
Colors, bordeaux and silver; Publication, Alpha Phi Quarterly. 

HISTORY 

Alpha Phi, one of the first Greek-letter sororities, was founded at Syracuse University, October 10, 1872. 
It was the first to call an Inter-Sorority Conference, in 1902. An organization was formed at this time which 
later changed its name to National Pan-Hellenic Congress. Alpha Phi was the first woman's fraternity to 
build and occupy a chapter house, to have a visiting delegate system, to have an Endowment Fund of $50,000, 
and to publish a History of the First Fifty Years. 

The Alpha Phi Quarterly is published for the purpose of keeping Alpha Phis in touch with one another, 
with the rest of the Greek world, and with recent events and trends in education. 

Three funds are maintained by Alpha Phi. The Founders' Loan Fund serves as a chapter house loan 
fund and assists Alpha Phis who need financial aid. The Clara Bradley Burdette Scholarship Fund helps 
new and old chapters which are in need of assistance, and encourages graduate study. The Martha Foote 
Crow Memorial Fund presents an annual gift to the Syracuse University Loan Fund. 

In 1933, a local sorority, Xi Omicron, was organized on the Duke University campus for the purpose of 
petitioning a national sorority. A formal petition was submitted to Alpha Phi in March, 1935. On May 11, 
1935, Mrs. Grace Colton Gordon, National President, formally installed Xi Omicron as Beta Nu chapter of 
Alpha Phi. 



336 





Bennett Applewhite 

Rankin Duckett 

Atzrodt Smith 

F. Duehring V. Duehring 

Wright 



Halsema 
Taylor 
Kincheloe 
Salmon 



337 



ALPHA EPSILON PHI 



Class of 1936 
Rubye Fcxgel, Georgetown, S. C. 



Class of 1937 
Jane Lins, Bradenton, Fla. 



Class of 1938 

Sylvia Berkowitz, Allentown, Pa.; Shirley Diamond, 
Jamaica, N. Y.; Frances Josephs, Chattanooga, Tenn.; 
Gertrude Sawilosky, Durham, N. C; Irene Stutson, 
Suffolk, Va.; Ruth Zinn, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Pledges 

Frances Brooks, Warsaw, N. C; Gertrude Fleet, 
Winter Haven, Fla.; Audrey Glaser, West Collings- 
wood, N. J.; Helen Levitt, Petersburg, Va. 



FACTS 

Number of active chapters, 23; Total membership, 2,958; Alpha Epsilon Phi founded, October 24, 1909; 
Alpha Epsilon at Duke, 1934; Colors, green and white; Flower, lily-of-the-valley; Publication, The Columns 
of Alpha Epsilon Phi. 

HISTORY 

Alpha Epsilon Phi was founded at Barnard College on October 24, 1909. It has the distinction of being 
the oldest and largest Jewish sorority in existence, having chapters in both the United States and Canada. 
Scholarship, citizenship, and service are among the ideals stressed in chapter life by Alpha Epsilon Phi. 

The chief publication of the sorority is the Columns of Alpha Epsilon Phi. 

The national organization has undertaken many philanthropic endeavors, and also has several diversified 
scholarships for members on campuses where chapters are located. 

Alpha Epsilon Phi accepted the petition of the local sorority, Nu Beta Phi, and Alpha Epsilon chapter was 
installed in 1934 on the Duke campus. 




Stutson Glaser Fogel 

Sawilosky Zinn 



Diamond Lins 

Weil Berkowitz Brooks 



338 




NON-SECRET 




Y. M. C. A. CABINET 




Alan MacQuarrie 
President 



The present Duke University Young Men's Chris- 
lain Association was organized in old Trinity College 
in 1887, and soon after that time became a member 
of the National Council of Student Christian Associa- 
tions, which is a part of the World Student Christian 
Federation. 

The local "Y" seeks to promote the ideals and 
purposes of the Student Christian movement and 
offers the campus an extensive program built around 
the ideal of a well balanced religious, cultural, and 
social life. 

The Y. M. C. A. has sponsored seven outstanding 
projects this year: 

Freshman Week: Twenty-five "Y" men, assisted 
by members of Beta Omega Sigma, returned to 
school early to aid freshmen in their orientation 
program and to help them feel more at home during 
their first week on the Duke campus. 

Reading Room in the Union: Realizing a long-felt 
need in the Union building for a reading, smoking, 
and reception room for the visitors and students, the 
Y. M. C. A. took the initiative in providing funds 
through contributions toward the refurnishing of the 
room, aided greatly in the interior decorating by 
Mrs. F. M. Hanes. The latest periodicals are provided 
for the new reading room. 

Peace Week: From November 7 to 11, in coopera- 
tion with the Duke Fellowship for World Peace, the 
local organization brought Dr. McNeill Poteat and the 
Rev. Tom Sykes to this campus to emphasize the need 
for peace-action among college students. Assembly 
programs were also conducted on this line. 

Dr. Toyohiko Kagawa: In collaboration with the 
Ministerial Association, the local "Y" made possible 
the appearance of this famed world Christian leader 
on the Duke campus during his stay in America. 



Bratzel 


Corriher 


Ketcham 


Whitmore 


Cottingham 


Ketchum 



Wilkinson 




340 



Y. M. C. A. CABINET 



Everitt 


Wildnauer 


Cleaveland 


Davis 


Bistline 


Lengler 



Richey 






Robert Kay 
Vice President 



Religious Emphasis Week: In March, the Rev. Dr. 
Henry H. Crane, of Scranton, Pa., returned for the 
fourth consecutive year under the auspices of the 
"Y" to conduct the services of the week. The 
campus turned out en masse to hear Dr. Crane's 
interesting, dynamic, and powerful addresses. Open 
forums and private discussions for various campus 
groups were also held. 

Dad's Day: For the purpose of bringing together the 
fathers of Duke men, the Y. M. C. A. sponsored 
Dad's Day over the Easter Week-end for the second 
time. All Duke Dads were invited to participate 
with their sons in a representative round of college 
activities in order that a better understanding of 
common problems be developed between fathers, 
sons, and faculty. 

Southern Peace-Action Movement: Under the 
direction of Douglas Corriher and McMurry Richey, 
the Duke "Y" has been the center of a peace-action 
movement extending over seven southern states. 
Peace-Agent, a mimeographed news bulletin, has 
been published bi-weekly and distributed throughout 
the South. 

In addition to these projects, the Social Committee 
has sponsored bi-monthly Open Houses which have 
been very popular among the students. The Recitals 
Committee has presented free of charge four Tuesday 
evening recitals to the University community. The 
Peace Committee brought Dr. Joseph Artman to the 
campus for discussion with various groups. Maga- 
zines are furnished the Student Infirmary and South- 
gate Dormitory. The "Y" also publishes the Duke 
Handbook and the Student Directory. 

Thus continuing its program of expansion, the 
Y. M. C. A. seeks to spread Christian ideals into every 
phase of student life on the campus. 



341 




SOPHOMORE "Y" COUNCIL 



William Fickes 
President 



The Sophomore Council of the Duke University 
Y. M. C. A., which was organized in the fall of 1933, 
is the latest addition to that organization. It is, more 
or less, an intermediary step between the Freshman 
Council and the Senior Cabinet. A limited number of 
the Freshman Council who have shown interest and 
'aken an active part in Y. M. C. A. work are selected 
each year to make up the Sophomore Council. Its 
members serve as assistants to the committee chair- 
men of the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, which is composed 
of juniors and seniors. 

Besides serving as assistants to the Senior Cabinet, 
the members of the Sophomore Council have a 
definite part to play in various activities sponsored 
by the Y. M. C. A. This year the Council has taken 
an active part in Freshman Week, Thanksgiving Day 
service in the chapel, and Religious Emphasis Week. 
The Council sponsored on the Easter Week-end the 
second annual Duke Dads' Day, an event which has 
become one of the most popular on the campus. 
Dads' Day was started last year by the Sophomore 
Council and met with more approval and success 
than had been anticipated. 



Dennis 
Rohrer 
Bierstein 
Yoder 



Spencer Stokes Bowman 

Lampe Sommerville Fair 

Roesti Clark McDonough 

Roesch Kraemer Heise 



Mason 



Gould 



McCracken 




342 



FRESHMAN COUNCIL 

Moore Foote Williams Warth Craven Snyder 

Stovall Shepard McKee Hudson Bunn Lewis 

Bushnell Laing Van Voorhis Turner Brown Whitaker 

Strickland Hulme Moorhead Markham Miller Groups 

Terry Butler Pawling Cree Holmes Jones 

Gibson McGimsey Wood Britz Rynd Dunc_ 

Slaner Williams Simmons 






Matt Murfree 
President 



The primary purpose of the Freshman Council is 
to stimulate among freshmen a feeling of Christian 
fellowship. In this manner the organization is 
creating lasting friendships among first year men, 
and training future workers for the Y. M. C. A. 

The council has been extremely active in extra- 
curricular activities. The programs of the group 
have been of great variety, including speakers 
representing the faculty and the students, smokers, 
informal discussions, socials, and hikes. 

The Council was active in getting the Southern 
Conference to permit the broadcasting of football 
games. Another worthwhile activity that it orig- 
inated was a "Prep-School Day," a day on which the 
members of high school and preparatory school 
seniors who were interested in a college career 
might become familiar with Duke University. The 
Council has also sponsored tours of the Duke Hos- 
pital, and has donated a Christmas tree for the lobby 
of the Men's Union. 

The Freshman Council is a highly cosmopolitan 
group which, through the varied programs offered, 
has gained insight into the ideals and functions of 
the Y. M. C. A. Thus it serves as an intermediary 
between new students, the "Y" organization, and 
its own work. 



343 




Y. W. C. A. CABINET 




Alma Hull 
President 



The Young Women's Christian Association of 
Duke University, a member of the Young Women's 
Christian Association of the United States of America 
and participant in the World Student Christian 
Federation, declares its purposes as follows: 

"We, the members of the Young Women's Chris- 
tain Association of Duke University, unite in the 
desire to realize full and creative life through a 
growing knowledge of God. 

"We determine to have a part in making this life 
possible for all people. 

"In this task we seek to understand Jesus and 
follow Him." 

The work of the Y. W. C. A. is carried out through 
an Advisory Board composed of members of the 
faculty and women of the community. The Cabinet 
is composed of the chairmen of various committees. 
These committees, social, publicity, social service, 
worship, program, freshman, and the interracial 
committees, are the means of carrying out effec- 
tively the work of the "Y" in its various branches. 

Particularly outstanding has been the work of the 
Social Service Committee in securing contributions 
of clothes, offering other services for local welfare 
agencies, enlisting the volunteer services of the 
students for palyground work at Wright's Refuge, 
and in connection with th« DuVo Hospital and Legal 
Aid Clinic. 



Sutton 

Rauchenberg 

Lawrence 



Winston 



McCauley Bowen 

Strauss Kinchloe 

Taylor Brown 
Carter 




344 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC 
flSSOCIflTION 



White Gray 

Rauschenberg Eaby 
Stine Sutton 

Cline 
Cleaver 



Strauss Ritchie 

Phillips Upchurch 

Briggs Little 

Whitmyre 
Burger 





Margaret Cuninggim 
President 



The Women's Athletic Association was founded 
in the spring of 1929. Its membership has increased 
during these six years to such an extent that it is 
now one of the leading campus organizations. The 
Association now has over three hundred members. 

Three of the greatest incentives for the promotion 
of athletic interest are: the field days which are held 
in the fall, winter, and spring; the awarding of letters, 
numerals, and sweaters; and the athletic cabin. 

In the fall, events in hockey, soccer, swimming, 
and riding are held while basketball and volley ball 
tournaments are held during the winter. The final 
events, tennis, archery, baseball, and track, are 
held in the spring. 

In giving awards, a point system has been estab- 
lished which gives class numerals to the fifteen girls 
who have the most points in each class. A black 
"D" goes to each of the ten girls who has the most 
points regardless of class. Old English "D's" are 
given to the six junior girls having the most points 
at the end of the year. These girls comprise the 
All-Duke Honorary Team. The class having the 
largest total of points for the year has its numerals 
placed on the banner which is in the gymnasium. 

As an organization for promoting the interest of 
students of the Women's College in athletics, the 
Women's Athletic Association is performing a 
valuable service on the East Campus. 



345 




TOWN GIRLS' CLUB 




Inez Abernethy 
President 



In 1927, the Town Girls' Club, composed of all 
of the town women students, was organized under 
the direction of Mrs. Hazen Smith. Since that date 
the Club has functioned as an integral part of the 
Woman's College, being represented on the Student 
Council by its president. 

The Club aims to keep girls who live off the campus 
in close connection with university life and to 
promote a spirit of good will among its members and 
the dormitory girls. To encourage the girls in 
various activities, the Club offers a prize to the 
member who has the greatest number of points in 
leadership and scholarship for the year. This point 
system is outlined in the undergraduate handbook. 

Under the leadership of its officers, the Town 
Girls' Club has placed itself in a position of prom- 
inence as one of the leading organizations on the 
East Campus, not only in point of membership, but 
also in point of its activities. It has provided an 
invaluable connecting link between the town girls 
and the resident students, and has thus provided a 
further incentive for Durham girls to attend Duke 
University. 



Childs 


Montague 


Edwards 


Ivey 


Izard 


Clark 


Mayes 


Pollard 


Zuckerman 


Patterson 


Gantt 


Plyler 


Franck 


Reade 


Newsom 


Upchurch 


Riley 


Strother 


Skinner 


Kueffner 




346 




HONORARY-PROFESSIONAL 




Jl^rtars 



Thomas 


Mossburg 


McCall 


Kunkle 




Johnston 


Sizemore 




Huiskannp 



348 




|gfttt<> DwcKtj 



Eaby 

Knight 

Gray 



Whitmyre 



Henderson 

Newsonn 

Haislip 



349 




Jack Alexander, Ernest C r u i k- 
shank, Billy Huiskamp, Charles Kun- 
kle, Jim McCall, Bob Mervine, Hyatt 



Mossburg, Pete Naktenis, Cliff Perry, 
Phil Russell, Frank Sizemore, Zack 
Thomas 




On Junior Standing: Henry Shroder 
Robinson, Herbert Strassburger Nus- 
baum, Betty Friemel, Ruth Frances 
Bowman, Mary Alice Rhodes, Ernes- 
tine Catharine Paul, Marion Roe, 
Ellen Cogswell Farnum, Ernest Cruik- 
shank, Edward William Cooey, Jane 
R. Haislip, Robert Hilly er Dick, 
Frances Isobel Shriner, Irwin Read 



Hale, Albert Lee Burford, William 
Egleston Woodruff, Frank Julian Size- 
more, Annie Laurie Newsom, James 
Joseph Brennan, Jr. 

On Senior Standing: Herbert Ack- 
land Pohl, Mrs. W. M. Baker (Virginia 
Kirk), Nancy Richmond Hudson, 
Elihu Bernard Bernstein, Henry Law- 
rens Harris, Ethel Williams. 




DELTA PHI ALPHA 




Helmuth Bode 
President 



Delta Phi Alpha has completed its fourth year of 
existence on the Duke campus. Having developed 
from the local German Club, which lost its identity 
in the spring of 1931, it has attempted to perpetuate 
and to extend the ideals of that body. The organiza- 
tion is honorary, its membership comprising those 
students who have earned a minimum average of 
2.25 quality points through the second year of 
German language, particularly in German literature 
and culture. The basic purpose of the organization 
is to bring together such students, providing them 
with advantages denied them as individuals, and to 
help sustain and broaden their interest. This year, 
Delta Phi Alpha has sponsored a society for the 
advancement of interest in German, membership 
in which is voluntary. 

The colors of the organization are red, black, and 
gold. The key, bearing the coat of arms in three 
colors, is the complete emblem of the fraternity. 
The German Eagle in gold is raised on a black back- 
ground. In the center of the eagle's breast is a 
shield upon which the three Greek letters. Delta Phi 
Alpha, are engraved. 

In point of membership the organization is one of 
the largest on the campus, having over forty members 
whose interest and scholarship in German has made 
them eligible for membership. With the raising of 

■ vbership requirements the society should be 
t .. II stronger in stimulating interest in German. 



Upchurch Pepper Sills Spence Nothdurft 

Menaker Cruikshank Bennett Dein Seymour 

Snyder Ritchie Nathanson Smith K. White 

Althoff Plump Silleck Baeder G. White 

Weinstein Faulkner Kritzer Bateman Von Glahn 
McCann Frantz Bernstein 

Fleming Rogers 




352 



MUSIC STUDY CLUB 



Laing Rich Rankin 

Paist Silleck Bassett 

R. Miller Bruton Foster 



Fogel Bogert 

Meetze Gibbons 

Beebe V. Miller 

Jenkins Evans Cockrell Paul Greenwood 

Patterson Zecher Snook Helvenston Roe 

Stutson Allen Shields Butler Lewis 





Isobel Shriner 
President 



The Music Study Club was organized four years 
ago for the purpose of arousing and encouraging an 
appreciation of music among the women students of 
Duke University. Besides holding monthly meetings 
at which various kinds of talented musicians are 
presented, the Club has sponsored several concerts 
by noted artists. 

In this organization we see embodied some of the 
aims and ambitions that unfortunately are fast dying 
out in the changing system of education. The general 
attitude is becoming one of popular dependence on 
the other person to entertain rather than an active 
participation or effort to entertain one's self, as 
was previously necessary before the advent of the 
radio and the motion picture with sound. The idea 
is prevalent that only the weaker human beings seek 
this study as a last resort. Were there a greater 
turning to the fine arts and especially to music by 
the public as a whole in the form of creative study and 
interest, there would be a real cultural improvement. 

In our educational system such interests have been 
allowed to slip, due to a popular demand for mate- 
rialism. A turn back, as in this Club's step, is a 
welcome relief, at least to an idealist. 

This year the club has sponsored several gatherings 
which were welcomed with great pleasure not only 
by the women but also by the men, especially the 
concert in which Nino Martini appeared. Such 
concerts have filled a real need on both campuses, 
and we feel that the Music Study Club has done a 
great service to the University in sponsoring them. 



353 




DELTA PHI RHO ALPHA 



Margery White 
President 



Delta Phi Rho Alpha is a local honorary athletic 
sorority which was created as a sister organization to 
Tombs, the athletic fraternity for men. This sorority 
was founded at Old Trinity College in 1921, and 
since then has become one of the traditions on the 
campus. 

There is constant need for women's interest in 
outdoor sports and athletic activity. This organization 
comes as an answer to such a demand. Through 
exercise, one of the fundamental bodily needs, it 
promotes health. 

Every year, seven new members are chosen after 
consideration of their leadership in athletic ability. 
Annually, it is the custom for these pledges to appear 
in the traditional "goat" costume — a middy blouse, 
cotton hose and tennis shoes — and to carry the 
symbolic rolling pin with the Greek inscription, 
Delta Phi Rho Alpha, inscribed upon it. 

This year, the sorority has sponsored a tennis 
tournament, presenting a silver loving cup to the 
winner. Each year, in addition, an inter-class 
basketball tournament is fostered. The winning 
team is awarded a banner with class numerals, 
providing an admirable sense of class consciousness. 
This promotes an interest in athletics which stimulates 
friendly rivalries and participation in healthful sports. 



Weyant 


Rich 


Ritchie 


Cline 


Baby 


Upchurch 


Rauchenberg 


Gray 


Cuninggim 


MacNutt 


Brumfield 


Burger 




354 



EKO-L 



Haislip Hudson Roe 

Shriner Baker Paul 

Helsema Farnum 

Eaby 






Mary Alice Rhodes 
President 



Elko-L was founded at Trinity College in 1914, with 
the purpose of encouraging and rewarding women 
of the college who had attained a marked degree of 
scholastic achievement. Its establishment came as 
an answer to the demand for recognition of those 
who had reached a mark of excellence in their under- 
graduate work. It served supreme in this capacity 
for six years, at which time it was partially supplanted 
by the establishment of Phi Beta Kappa. Eko-L then 
assumed a position similar to that of 9019 on the 
men's campus, in that both are local societies drawing 
their membership from the two upper classes. 

The membership of Eko-L is quite select, and it is 
recognized as a great honor to become a part of this 
society. Since the year of its founding it has main- 
tained a high standard of leadership as well as 
scholarship on the Duke women's campus, and it is 
duly proud of the record which has been made by 
those who have been deemed worthy of membership. 

In past years, this society has sponsored interesting 
and worthwhile contests throughout the schools of 
the state in the writing of short stories and poetry. 
These contests serve not only as a means of scholastic 
recognition, but also as a means of advancing the 
interests of Trinity College and Duke University 
among the people of the state. 

It may be seen, therefore, that Eko-L serves as an 
active organization as well as being a reward for 
scholarship of a superior type. By not confining 
itself purely to the honorary type of organization, 
Eko-L performs an additional service to the University. 



355 




NEREIDIAN CLUB 



Gwendolyn Cline 
President 



The Nereidian Club was founded in the spring of 
1930 for the promotion of better swimming among 
the women of Duke University. This is an honorary 
organization and membership is based on ability in 
swimming, which is determined by various tests of 
strokes, dives, and SF)eed. The members of the Club 
are the sole participants in the swimming meets given 
in cooperation with the Women's Athletic Association. 
In the spring and fall of each year, the Nereidians 
sponsor a traditional water pageant to which all the 
student body is invited. 

In order to determine those worthy of membership, 
various tryouts are given twice each year. Each 
potential member is judged by ten or more members 
of the Club and two faculty members. Then grades 
are averaged and the new Nereid is voted upon by 
the club in regard to ability in swimming and per- 
sonal factors. 

The colors of the organization, red, gold, and blue, 
are embodied in the head of a Devil Fish which is 
the emblem worn on the suit of each member. 

This year's Nereidian Club feels that it has accom- 
plished much towards encouraging aguatic sports, 
and it earnestly hopes that its members will continue 
to promote the best interests of the organization. 




Hollmeyer Atzrodt 

Jackson Stone 

Whitmyre Creery 

White Vickers 



Boyd Bliss 

Millar Becker 

Helvenston Cleaver 

Costigan Pippen 



Schaffle 



Seymour Pennell 




356 



BETA OMEGA SIGMA 




Northrup 

Stauffer 

Farrar 

Scanlon 

White 

Beyer 

Fickes 



Webster 

Bradsher 

Steckel 

Boger 

Stocks 

Walker 

Little 



Montgomery 

Quick 

Mathews 

Hackney 

Ryon 

Clay 

Colson 




Beta Omega Sigma was organized as an honorary 
sophomore fraternity at Trinity College in 1917. The 
underlying principles of the organization are: to 
honor freshmen who lead in extra-curricular activi- 
ties, to supervise freshman discipline, and to aid in 
furthering tradition and school spirit on the campus. 

This year B. O. S. members gave their services to 
the freshmen during the first week of school. Their 
work, however, did not stop with Freshman Orienta- 
tion. The fraternity met each week with the house 
officers of the various freshman dormitories. These 
meetings rendered a great aid in fostering a splendid 
spirit in the freshman class. B. O. S. assisted during 
home-coming day by offering three prizes for the best 
decorations on the campus. It also cooperated with 
Sandals, the similar organization for women, in 
sponsoring a benefit dance. In addition, the mem- 
bers have begun a movement to expand the organiza- 
tion into a national fraternity. 

The Class of 1938 feels that it has accomplished 
the results expected of it, and is ambitious for the 
continuance of its work by the Class of 1939. With 
a tradition of respect and service behind it, B. O. S. 
looks forward to a future of increased activity and 
campus usefulness. 



357 




PHI ETA SIGMA 




Preston Webster 
President 



Phi Eta Sigma is the only national freshman 
honorary scholastic fraternity in existence; and, since 
it was founded at the University of Illinois in 1923, it 
has grown rapidly. There are now thirty-five chapters 
situated in various educational centers throughout 
the United States. 

Membership in Phi Eta Sigma is extended to those 
freshmen who show by their scholastic achievements 
that they are endowed with exceptional intellectual 
ability. The requirements for membership are prac- 
tically equal to a Phi Beta Kappa average for one 
semester or an average of 2.25 quality points per 
semester hour of work carried. Phi Eta Sigma is not 
an end in itself, however, but only a beginning. 
Grades as such are unimportant; but, as an indication 
of ability and sincerity of purpose, they are very 
important. 

In 1932, after a year's existence as a local chapter, 
Alpha Eta, a petition was granted, whereby the Duke 
chapter of Phi Eta Sigma was established, the result 
of the efforts of the late Dean M. Arnold, who was 
the faculty adviser and an honorary member of 
the fraternity. Since his death. Dean Alan K. 
Manchester, also an honorary member, has ably 
filled the position of faculty adviser. 

Last spring Phi Eta Sigma held its fourth national 
convention at the University of Oklahoma; at which 
our vice president represented the Duke chapter. 

Although the fraternity has been primarily an 
honorary organization during the four brief years of 
its existence on the Duke campus, it has ably provided 
an incentive tor acxxl .scholarship among freshman 
men. 



Greenfield 
Dennis 
Taylor 
Turner 



Ris 

Crawford 

Atkinson 

Sheehan 



Kuperman 
Cooke 
Bailey 
Garber 




358 



SANDALS 



Auld 


McCauley 


Winston 


Love 


Opper 


Strauss 


Holland 


Morton 


Muelberger 


Larsen 


Baggs 


Minor 


Daniel 


Stine 


Young 


Richards 




Lawrence 


White 








Helen Cleaver 
President 



Sandals is an honorary sophomore organization 
which was started by the Woman's College Student 
Government in 1932. Its twenty members are girls 
chosen at the end of their freshman year for out- 
standing leadership in scholarship, general attitude, 
and activity on the campus. They assist the Student 
Government, help during Freshman Week, and co- 
operate with Social Standards in maintaining the 
Ark, a recreational center on the East Campus. 

An outstanding innovation this year was a Sandals- 
Beta Omega Sigma dance, which, it is hoped, will 
become a tradition. Their project of improving the 
Ark consisted in building a stairway to the balcony, 
which was painted and improved for use, thereby 
giving more room for the ping-pong tables upstairs 
and providing greater dancing space with a 
better position for the orchestra. The lighting system 
is scheduled to be changed, and improvements in 
interior decorations are to be made. The proceeds 
from the joint dance are to go into a fund for this 
purpose. The Ark is being used more and more, and 
fills a vital need in the social life of the college. 

The Sandals have created for themselves a very 
real place among the campus organizations in the 
short time of their existence upon the campus. 

The society looks forward with confidence to the 
future with the belief that its scope of service and 
usefulness to the University will be increased as its 
traditions become more firmly established. 



359 




Joe A. Trainor, Jr 
President 



Iota Gamma Pi was founded in October, 1922, by 
a group of students in scientific departments of 
Trinity College. Previous to this time there was no 
organization of any kind devoted primarily to the 
interests of students in the different scientific fields, 
and there was a feeling among a few interested 
students that there should be some society or group 
which would promote fraternal interests between 
men in the fields of science. They also desired to 
recognize scholarship and leadership in this work. 

This fraternity is composed of twenty or twenty-five 
men from the junior and senior classes of Trinity 
College who have excelled in scholarship and leader- 
ship, and who are primarily interested in some branch 
of scientific study. At the bi-monthly meetings of 
the fraternity the students give talks and discuss the 
latest developments in their own fields of study. 
Through these meetings, the members of the fra- 
ternity gain valuable knowledge concerning what 
is going on in other lines of work, and at the same 
time each student has an opportunity to discuss his 
own findings. 

In stimulating interest in scientific studies and in 
rewarding with membership those students who 
demonstrate their proficiency in such subjects. Iota 
Gamma Pi is endeavoring to further enthusiasm for 
what it believes to be the primary purpose of college 
training. If the fraternity succeeds in its ideals, it will 
have performed a worthy service to the University. 



IOTA GAMMA PI 




Cooper Schuerman Rushmer 

Dick Turner Woodruff 

Nathanson Jackson Schaeffer 

Scattergood Saleeby Frantz 

Somers Nisbet 








360 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI 



Cruikshank 

Gill 

Boyd 



Wilson 
Haardt 
Austin 



Van Nostrand Bean 



Burge 

Phinney 

Byrne 



Hunter 
Gillis 

Ulrich 



Yelverton 

Wright 

Thoman 

Smith 

Sinclair 

Witcover 

Gallup 



Crawford 

Abbott 

Simmons 

Steeg 

Eltinge 

Ryon 

Davis 






Fred A. Wildnauer 
President 



Alpha Kappa Psi is the oldest and largest national 
professional commerce fraternity. From a small 
group of ten founders at New York University in 1904 
It has grown into an international organization 
numbering forty-three college chapters and fourteen 
alumni chapters with a membership of more than 
10,000. Beta Eta chapter was founded at Duke 
University in December, 1929, and since that time 
has inducted 134 members. 

The purposes of the fraternity are two-fold: to fur- 
ther professional development in fields of commerce, 
accounting, and finance; and to foster higher stand- 
ards of business ethics. Alpha Kappa Psi affords 
a medium through which men with common interests 
can form beneficial contacts. 

The official publication of the fraternity is The 
Diary of Alpha Kappa Psi, which contains many 
educational items concerning current business prob- 
lems written by active and alumni members. 

The fraternity offers annually the Alpha Kappa 
Psi Scholarship Medallion to the senior maintaining 
the highest average in economic studies at Duke 
University. This year, the local chapter, in collab- 
oration with Dr. Nichol, of the Economics Department, 
established a bookshelf in the University library 
which is devoted to vocational guidance. The 
program on the campus includes bi-monthly smokers 
at which prominent business men and professors 
discuss current economic problems. 



361 




CHI DELTA PHI 




Nancy Hudson 
President 



Chi Delta Phi, national honorary literary sorority, 
was founded in 1919 at the University of Tennessee. 
The purpose of the sorority is to bring together repre- 
sentative college women who, by their literary interest 
and creative ability, shall uphold the highest ideals 
of a liberal education. 

There are at present thirty-eight chapters of Chi 
Delta Phi, the Duke chapter having been established 
in 1922. The publication of the sorority is the 
Litterateur, issued quarterly; the badge, a five- 
pointed star in blue, bearing on its face a lamp and 
the three Greek letters of the name in gold, the whole 
being surrounded by a gold or pearl circle, with a 
pair of quills across the pin beneath the star. The 
national colors are blue and gold; the flower is the 
pansy. 

The national organization holds annual poetry and 
prose contests, entries being received from its own 
chapters and from those of Sigma Upsilon, a similar 
literary organization for men. 

In an effort to stimulate literary interest on the 
campus, the Duke chapter has held a series of open 
meetings at which authorities in different phases of 
literary activity have spoken before the group. 
Honorary members of Chi Delta Phi have addressed 
the organization, and during the fall semester the 
sorority sponsored an exhibit of children's books in 
connection with National Children's Book Week. 



Graham 
Henderson 

Lindsey 
Secrest 



Fogel 
Taylor 

Ranson 
Kern 




362 



9019 



Cruikshank 


Trainor 


Cleaveland 


Sapp 


Dick 


Cooey 


Pohl 


Cox 


Upchurch 


Womble 


Bistline 


Walter 


Collins 


Vail 


Friedlander 


Deneen 


Brown 


Shore 


Hale 


Goldstein 


Menaker 


Arnold 


Frantz 


Baeder 



Desvernine Corriher 



Jackson 





Henry S. Robinson 
President 



The order of 9019 was founded many years ago on 
the campus of Trinity College, before the institution 
was moved, in 1892; from Randolph County to 
Durham. 

The purposes of the organization are the fostering 
of scholarship and the support of all movements in 
college, city, or state v/hich are aimed at cultural or 
intellectual advancement. 

Membership in 9019 is granted on the basis of two 
consecutive years of study at Trinity College with an 
average grade of B plus, or as recorded by the Uni- 
versity, of two and one-guarter guality points. 

The roll book of the society lists over five hundred 
and twenty-five members, of whom thirty-two are 
now undergraduates in the College. Once every 
year, "9019 Day," February 21, many of the alumni 
members gather on the campus for a reunion and 
banquet and for a discussion of the accomplishments 
of the past year and the plans for the one to come. 

The program of activities, not strictly limited to 
9019 members, has included in former years a state- 
wide oratorical contest for high school seniors. 
More recently the group has sponsored a series of 
Current Events Forums in which topics of national or 
international interest in the fields of politics, eco- 
nomics, foreign affairs, and so forth, have been 
presented before enthusiastic audiences. By con- 
tinuing and broadening such programs as these, 
9019 hopes to become, more and more, an influential 
factor in the University life and to assist in raising 
the cultural and scholastic standards of the College. 



363 




TOMBS 



Charles Kunkle 
President 

Jule Ward 
Vice President 

Jack Hennemier 
Secretary 

Peter Naktenis 
Treasurer 



Tombs, a local athletic fraternity, was established at Trinity College in 1905. 
Founded primarily as an honorary athletic organization, Tombs has evolved 
into one of the outstanding, beneficial brotherhoods on the Duke campus. No 
longer purely honorary, the organization bids athletic letter-winners. This 
past year the society drew up a new constitution. In addition to fostering better 
relationship in sports between Duke and other universities. Tombs endeavors 
to build up school spirit, to implant more firmly the traditions of old Trinity, and 
to create new ones for the rapidly growing Duke University. The one night 
of freshman reverence for this organization and the traditions for which it stands, 
Tombs Night, has been eliminated. This year Tombs sponsored a movement 
against smoking in the gymnasium. A high school invitation track meet or 
basketball tournament has also been proposed. 

Though there are inscribed on its rolls the names of many celebrities of 
national sports, the men who are invited to Tombs are not only those who star 
on the athletic field but also, in many cases, those who are leaders in campus 
government and scholarship. Thus is made an effective answer to the cries 
of over -emphasis of sports in the leading universities of the country. 




Back Row: Podqer, Shortell, Corbitt, McGrail, Riley, Parker, Ford, Naktenis, Daniel, McCaskill, Herrick, 

Cardwell 
Center Row: Ferris, Hennemier, Ward, Alterman, Liana, George, Ardolino, Mossburg, Keator, Powers 
Front Row: Stevenson, Cheek, Pickard, Johnston, Morse, Parsons, Shehan, Huiskamp 



364 




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in a variety of cool, soft fabric that iron 

out across your chest without a sloppy 

wrinkle. And washing won't weaken the 

springy knit. Hanes never hangs like a 

bag! See your Hanes dealer today. P. H. 

Hanes Knitting Co., Winston-Salem, N. C. 



EACH 

For Shirts and Shorts 

Others, 50c each 

• 

SAMSONBAK 

UNION-SUITS $1 

(^Sanforized') 

Others 75c and up 



1 




FOR MEN AND BOYS 
FOR EVERY SEASON 




The 

GRILL 

& 

FOUNTAIN 

111 Eost Main Street Phone J-0721 

"Approved for Co-eds" 




BEACON OF THRIFT 
FOR ALL 



SOLE OFFICIAL JEWELER 

TO 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 




SINCE 1897 



faclurersof 

Graft (Jewelry 
and Stationery 



General Offices and Main Plant - Owatonna, Minnesoto 

Service Offices 
Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Fargo, Kansas Lity, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, Rochester 



KOOL 

CIGARETTES 

MILDLY MEiNTHOLATED 
CORK TIPPED 

Save the Coupons in Each Package 





SIR WALTER 

RALEIGH 

SMOKING TOBACCO 



The Mill Barley BIcml Kept Fresh 
in Gold Foil 



Duke University Laundry 

Specialists in the care 

of 
College Men's Clothes 



Collection and Delivery Daily 

in All Dormitories by Student 

Representatives 



J. H. JUDD, JR., '24, Manager 



Mill Supplies-Machinery 

Plumbing - Heating Equipment 
Contractors Supplies 



Wheelbarrows, Picks, Shovels, Scrapers, 

Pumping Equipment for every purpose, 

Pipes, Valves, Fittings, etc. 



SEND US YOUR ORDERS AND INQUIRIES 

—WE HAVE THE GOODS AND BACK 

IT UP WITH THE SERVICE 



DILLON SUPPLY CO. 



Phone L-993 
DURHAM, N. C. 



Meeting 

the Printing Needs 

of Business 

for over 
Fifty Years 



THE SEEMAN 
PRI NTERY 

Incorporated 
Durham, North Carolina 



Reeves' 
AMERICAN INN 

* 

GOOD FOOD 
GOOD SERVICE 

• 

CHAPEL HILL STREET, NEAR FIVE POINTS 



TIP TOP TAVERN 

SEA FOOD A SPECIALTY 
LIGHT WINES and BEER 

Play Billiards for CLEAN Recreation 



315 Chapel Hill Street 



Durham, N. C. 



J. Southgate and Son, Inc. 



and 



Home Insurance Agency 



Insurers for 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



J 



lot J^45<k'€t.^==— of oood vJ'ootl 



HOTEL WASHINGTON DUKE 
r 



Delightfully reminiscent 

Of the Old South, 

Quaint of fixture, furnishing and 

Costume, 

Food deliciously prepared 

And graciously served, 

Combining everything you've 

Dreamed of to make an eating 

Place alluring. 

Drop in today. 

Bring your friends, or 

Sweetheart. 

Enjoy a rore mood 

And a meal you'll never forget. 

Priced to help you come often! 



WASHINGTON DUKE TAVERN 

EVERY DELIGHT A MEAL AFFORDS 
A la Carte Service Blue Plate Lunch 45c 






.— -4*v:-^::k 


1 


We 


I invite the patronage 




1 mrai 


or Uui^fc; uiiivtribiiy biuueiiib, 

organizations and faculty 




m 


hJM 


Af 


•1 


HOME SAVINGS BANK 


mm 


L\^ 


^ Efficient and Capable Service 


liffinWifiliiaSwWr 


1 




RESOURCES OVER 




ff 


1 $2,200,000 




I 


1 


1 


1 JOHN SPRUNT HILL, President 




! 






i WM. W. SLEDGE, Vice President 


B'/'lmM in 




%\i 


1 T. C, WORTH, Cashier 




9 


Satisfaction 




Guarantee 


DRINK 




^ 
d 


1 

AN important part of any 






business — giving satisfac- 


IN BOTTL 


ES 


tion. If you are satisfied 
with a purchase you'll go 


9,000,000 Coca -Col 
Sold Daily 


as 


back. You'll find it here in 
our FOOD;-- PRICES end 
SERVICE. 


DURHAM 




COCA-COLA BOTTL 


ING CO. PENDER'S STORES 


DURHAM, N. C. 






FISHER RIDING CLUB 

E R W 1 \ K A D 
Phone N-2604. 



Catering to 

Duke University Community 

INSTRUCTION AND TRANSPORTATION FREE 



The 

Depositors National Bank 
of Durham 

Durham, N. C. 



MEMBER 

Federal Reserve System 

and 

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



OFFICERS 

Robert H. Sykfs, President Scovill Waimamaker, Cashier 
M. A. Briggs, Vice President C .]. Miller, Assistant (Cashier 



Insist on 



DURHAM 

DAIRY 

PRODUCTS 

INC. 



Dairy Products 

Durham's Standard of Quality 

Durham Dairy Products, Inc. 

DURHAM AND CHAPEL HILL 



TIRE DIVISION 

ALEXANDER MOTOR CO. 

THREE ONE-STOP STATIONS 
TO SERVE YOU 

Firestone Tires, Batteries and Accessories 

American Gas and Oil 



THE YOUNG MEN'S SHOP 

126-128 East Main Street 
Durham, North Carolina 



Style 



Quality 



Value 



FANCY ICES S H ERB ETS 


Phone L-963 


"ICE CREAM SPECIALISTS" 


dlrha;vi ice cream company 


Incorporated 


FAST FROZEN 


"Blue Ribbon" Ice Cream 


TODAY 


Made with Pure Cream "It is Thrifty to Buy Quality" 


BLOCKS PUNCHES 


CONGRATULATIONS 




TO THE CLASS 




OF '36 






Connpliments of 
Carolina-Paramount-Riolto 


It has been our privilege to serve 


the students and faculty of Duke 
University for years. We appre- 


Theatres 


ciate your patronage. 


DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 


DURHAM DRUG CO. 




330 W. Moin Street Durham, N. C. 





-/ 




OWNFD AND OPERATED BV 



U4lXilABERDASHERY 

DURHAM, N.C. 



Duke University 
Stores 



EAST CAMPUS 



WEST CAMPUS 



Owned and Operated by 

Duke University 



HOSPITAL 



... Offer ... 

SERVICES : CONVENIENCE : PAR PRICES 




OUR GREAT SEAL . . . 

AND If HAT IT MEANS TO YOU 

Fidflily, ai-cordiii'; hi the (lictiotiai y. means '"faitlifuliK'ss to trust or oblijiaticm." That is the first prituiple 
(if this hank. 'I'iie l-idelily seal stands for that — and more. It stands for K\|)erienie. Judgment. Manage- 
ment; for a hank with a long record. It means that experienced and skilllid lianil> are handling your 
hanking affairs, whether it he a savings account, commercial account or a trust agreement. 
IJchiiid llie imprint of the Fidelity seal is the group juilgnicnt of our oliicers and directors: liro;i(l ex- 



perience and trciiiiiiig ni>l easil\ acqtiiied 



III uhicli 1 



;i\ciilalilc In c\cr\ custotncr oi tlic lidrlilN. 



j^^ 



IDELITY 

Bmilz 



Y. I). I. C. 



DURHAM. N. C. 



J. A. MURDOCKCOMPANY 



INCORPORATED 



ICE AND COAL 



Main Office ond Plont — 518 Morgon Street 



F.40n — TELEPHONES — J-0341 



BELK-LEGGETT 
COM P AN Y 



A most pleasant and profitable 
place to shop 



Main through to Chapel Hill Street 



AN OLD DUKE 
TRADITION 



'Riding the Bus with Skipper' 



DURHAM PUBLIC 
SERVICE COMPANY 



Lakewood Dairy milk, 
the standard of quality 
in Durham for over a 
6 generation. 



LAKEWOOD DAIRY 



Phone F-9801 



Sinclair at Five Points 



DAIPY P^DJiSSJ 




~&Nfii'a H /{'€€/ .J/t fii'/a f/io n 



"Tomorroii's Styles — Today" 

L 

1911 : CLOTHIERS & FURNISHERS : 1936 
Washington Duke Hold Bldg. Diiiliam. N. C. 



PASCHALL BAKERY 

Mallie J. Paschall, Proprietor 

BREAD CAKES PIES 

Be Sure That it is Poscholl's Pride 

New Plant: Corner Duke and Morgan Streets 
Durham, North Carolina 



Always call for 

WAVERLY ICE CREAM 

and you'll get the best 



"Made its way by the way it's made" 



Manufactured by 

WAVERLY ICE CREAM CO., INC. 

320 HOLLAND STREET 
Durham, N. C. 



MOLLOY-MADE 

COVER QUALITY 



is still serving the best books in the land — just as it 
did in the pioneer days of the modern yearbook. The 
cover on this volume is a physical expression of that 
fine quality and workmanship which the Molloy trade- 
mark has always symbolized. 



The David J. Molloy Plant 

2857 NORTH WESTERN AVENUE 



Chicago, Illinois 



D 
I 



The University Unions 

A DISTINGUISHED SERVICE 
AT THE CENTER OF CAMPUS ACTIVITIES 



in Dining Rooms 



S Among the most beautiful in America. 

T 

I in Food 

N 

C 

T 
I 

The dining room personnel is limited to courteous and 

N efficient student service. 



The best food tastefully prepared. 

in Service 



The Women's Union The Men's Union 

on on 

The East Campus The West Campus 



The Coffee Shoppe 

(WEST CAMPUS) 

Continuous a la Carte Service 



Both Unions Provide Unusual Facilities for 

Special Luncheons and Dinners 

of Any Size 



'Union Service isthe Best Service" 




Aerial View of Duke University 

Duke University 

Curricula, equipment and expense information 
may be obtained from 

The General BulleHn 

The Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction 

The Bulletin of the Graduate School 

The Bulletin of the School of Religion 

The Bulletin of the School of Low 

The Bulletin of the School of Medicine 

The Bulletin of the School of Nursing 

The Bulletin of the Summer Schools 

The Bulletin of the Departments of Engineering 

The Bulletin of Forestry 

Address applications and inquiries to 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



THE SECRETARY 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



PATRONIZE 


DU RHAM 


SHELL 


SERVICE 


STATIONS 


CLAIBORNE HURST, DUKE '32 


Chapel Hill Street and Yates Avenue 


TROY S. MIZE WESLEY VICKERS 


Mangum and Hoywood Streets East Main Street 


JOHNSON - PREVOST 


STANDARD CHAIR CO. 


CLEANERS - PRESSERS 


Wholesale Manufacturers 




• 




PORCH ROCKERS 


T-\QUIPMENT fUEEVICE 
ti XPERIENCE VkILL 
JJiFFICIENCY kJPEED 


CHAIRS 




BREAKFAST ROOM SUITES 


424 W. Main Street. Phone 'pniol 
1106 Broad Street, Phone J^ 3451 




• 


DURHAM, N. C. 






Thomasville, North Carolina 


HAPPY - SNAPPY - SERVICE 


"The Chair Tiiiin" 



CAROLINA'S LARGEST 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 

CONCERN 



•■•■ 



SIDDELL STUDIO 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

for 

CHANTICLEER 



W I*. > '. 




nmmm imk\m co. 



• 15 -119 LUCKIE STREET X ATL 



ANTA GEORGIA 




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